Year:

  1. Sofia Bisogni, Corinna Aringhieri, Kathleen McGreevy, Nicole Olivini, José R. G. Lopez, Daniele Ciofi, Alberta M. Merlo, Paola Mariotti & Filippo Festini (2015). Actual Implementation of Sick Children’s Rights in Italian Pediatric Units: A Descriptive Study Based on Nurses’ Perceptions. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):33.
    Several charters of rights have been issued in Europe to solemnly proclaim the rights of children during their hospital stay. However, notwithstanding such general declarations, the actual implementation of hospitalized children’s rights is unclear. The purpose of this study was to understand to which extent such rights, as established by the two main existing charters of rights, are actually implemented and respected in Italian pediatric hospitals and the pediatric units of Italian general hospitals, as perceived by the nurses working in (...)
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  2. Joar Björk, Niels Lynøe & Niklas Juth (2015). Are Smokers Less Deserving of Expensive Treatment? A Randomised Controlled Trial That Goes Beyond Official Values. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):28.
    To investigate whether Swedish physicians, contrary to Swedish health care policy, employ considerations of patient responsibility for illness when rationing expensive treatments.
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  3. A. J. Brüggemann, Katarina Swahnberg & Barbro Wijma (2015). A First Online Intervention to Increase Patients’ Perceived Ability to Act in Situations of Abuse in Health Care: Reports of a Swedish Pre-Post Study. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):35.
    Efforts to counteract abuse in health care, defined as patient-experienced abuse, have mainly focused on interventions among caregivers. This study is the first to test an online intervention focusing on how patients can counteract such abuse. The intervention aimed at increasing patients’ intention and perceived ability to act in future situations where they risk experiencing abuse.
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  4. Megan M. Campbell, Ezra Susser, Jantina de Vries, Adam Baldinger, Goodman Sibeko, Michael M. Mndini, Sibonile G. Mqulwana, Odwa A. Ntola, Raj S. Ramesar & Dan J. Stein (2015). Exploring Researchers’ Experiences of Working with a Researcher-Driven, Population-Specific Community Advisory Board in a South African Schizophrenia Genomics Study. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundCommunity engagement within biomedical research is broadly defined as a collaborative relationship between a research team and a group of individuals targeted for research. A Community Advisory Board is one mechanism of engaging the community. Within genomics research CABs may be particularly relevant due to the potential implications of research findings drawn from individual participants on the larger communities they represent. Within such research, CABs seek to meet instrumental goals such as protecting research participants and their community from research-related risks, (...)
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  5. John D. Chetwood, Nimzing G. Ladep & Simon D. Taylor-Robinson (2015). Research Partnerships Between High and Low-Income Countries: Are International Partnerships Always a Good Thing? BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-5.
    BackgroundInternational partnerships in research are receiving ever greater attention, given that technology has diminished the restriction of geographical barriers with the effects of globalisation becoming more evident, and populations increasingly more mobile.DiscussionIn this article, we examine the merits and risks of such collaboration even when strict universal ethical guidelines are maintained. There has been widespread examples of outcomes beneficial and detrimental for both high and low –income countries which are often initially unintended.SummaryThe authors feel that extreme care and forethought should (...)
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  6. Anna H. Chodos & Sei J. Lee (2015). Journalists, District Attorneys and Researchers: Why IRBs Should Get in the Middle. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):19.
    Federal regulations in the United States have shaped Institutional Review Boards to focus on protecting individual human subjects. Health services research studies focusing on healthcare institutions such as hospitals or clinics do not have individual human subjects. Since U.S. federal regulations are silent on what type of review, if any, these studies require, different IRBs may approach similar studies differently, resulting in undesirable variation in the review of studies focusing on healthcare institutions. Further, although these studies do not focus on (...)
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  7. Gemma Clarke, Sarah Galbraith, Jeremy Woodward, Anthony Holland & Stephen Barclay (2015). Eating and Drinking Interventions for People at Risk of Lacking Decision-Making Capacity: Who Decides and How? BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundSome people with progressive neurological diseases find they need additional support with eating and drinking at mealtimes, and may require artificial nutrition and hydration. Decisions concerning artificial nutrition and hydration at the end of life are ethically complex, particularly if the individual lacks decision-making capacity. Decisions may concern issues of life and death: weighing the potential for increasing morbidity and prolonging suffering, with potentially shortening life. When individuals lack decision-making capacity, the standard processes of obtaining informed consent for medical interventions (...)
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  8. Rachel Davies, Jonathan Ives & Michael Dunn (2015). A Systematic Review of Empirical Bioethics Methodologies. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):15.
    Despite the increased prevalence of bioethics research that seeks to use empirical data to answer normative research questions, there is no consensus as to what an appropriate methodology for this would be. This review aims to search the literature, present and critically discuss published Empirical Bioethics methodologies.
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  9. Kristina Edvardsson, Rhonda Small, Ann Lalos, Margareta Persson & Ingrid Mogren (2015). Ultrasound’s ‘Window on the Womb’ Brings Ethical Challenges for Balancing Maternal and Fetal Health Interests: Obstetricians’ Experiences in Australia. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):31.
    Obstetric ultrasound has become a significant tool in obstetric practice, however, it has been argued that its increasing use may have adverse implications for women’s reproductive freedom. This study aimed to explore Australian obstetricians’ experiences and views of the use of obstetric ultrasound both in relation to clinical management of complicated pregnancy, and in situations where maternal and fetal health interests conflict.
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  10. Nathan Emmerich, Deborah Swinglehurst, Jo Maybin, Sophie Park & Sally Quilligan (2015). Caring for Quality of Care: Symbolic Violence and the Bureaucracies of Audit. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):23.
    This article considers the moral notion of care in the context of Quality of Care discourses. Whilst care has clear normative implications for the delivery of health care it is less clear how Quality of Care, something that is centrally involved in the governance of UK health care, relates to practice.
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  11. Reidun Førde & Trude Linja (2015). It Scares Me to Know That We Might Not Have Been There!”: A Qualitative Study Into the Experiences of Parents of Seriously Ill Children Participating in Ethical Case Discussions. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundAll hospital trusts in Norway have clinical ethics committees . Some of them invite next of kin/patients to be present during the discussion of their case. This study looks closer at how parents of seriously ill children have experienced being involved in CEC discussions.MethodsTen next of kin of six seriously ill children were interviewed. Their cases were discussed in two CECs between April of 2011 and March of 2014. The main ethical dilemma was limitation of life-prolonging treatment. Health care personnel (...)
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  12. Aaron J. Goldenberg, Karen J. Maschke, Steven Joffe, Jeffrey R. Botkin, Erin Rothwell, Thomas H. Murray, Rebecca Anderson, Nicole Deming, Beth F. Rosenthal & Suzanne M. Rivera (2015). IRB Practices and Policies Regarding the Secondary Research Use of Biospecimens. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):32.
    As sharing and secondary research use of biospecimens increases, IRBs and researchers face the challenge of protecting and respecting donors without comprehensive regulations addressing the human subject protection issues posed by biobanking. Variation in IRB biobanking policies about these issues has not been well documented.
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  13. Uría Guevara-López, Myriam M. Altamirano-Bustamante & Carlos Viesca-Treviño (2015). New Frontiers in the Future of Palliative Care: Real-World Bioethical Dilemmas and Axiology of Clinical Practice. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):11.
    In our time there is growing interest in developing a systematic approach to oncologic patients and end-of-life care. An important goal within this domain is to identify the values and ethical norms that guide physicians’ decisions and their recourse to technological aids to preserve life. Though crucial, this objective is not easy to achieve.
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  14. Irma M. Hein, Pieter W. Troost, Alice Broersma, Martine C. De Vries, Joost G. Daams & Ramón J. L. Lindauer (2015). Why is It Hard to Make Progress in Assessing Children’s Decision-Making Competence? BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1.
    For decades, the discussion on children’s competence to consent to medical issues has concentrated around normative concerns, with little progress in clinical practices. Decision-making competence is an important condition in the informed consent model. In pediatrics, clinicians need to strike a proper balance in order to both protect children’s interests when they are not fully able to do so themselves and to respect their autonomy when they are. Children’s competence to consent, however, is currently not assessed in a standardized way. (...)
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  15. Carly Hohm & Jeremy Snyder (2015). It Was the Best Decision of My Life”: A Thematic Content Analysis of Former Medical Tourists’ Patient Testimonials. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):8.
    Medical tourism is international travel with the intention of receiving medical care. Medical tourists travel for many reasons, including cost savings, limited domestic access to specific treatments, and interest in accessing unproven interventions. Medical tourism poses new health and safety risks to patients, including dangers associated with travel following surgery, difficulty assessing the quality of care abroad, and complications in continuity of care. Online resources are important to the decision-making of potential medical tourists and the websites of medical tourism facilitation (...)
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  16. Sara Rizvi Jafree, Rubeena Zakar, Florian Fischer & Muhammad Zakria Zakar (2015). Ethical Violations in the Clinical Setting: The Hidden Curriculum Learning Experience of Pakistani Nurses. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):16.
    The importance of the hidden curriculum is recognised as a practical training ground for the absorption of medical ethics by healthcare professionals. Pakistan’s healthcare sector is hampered by the exclusion of ethics from medical and nursing education curricula and the absence of monitoring of ethical violations in the clinical setting. Nurses have significant knowledge of the hidden curriculum taught during clinical practice, due to long working hours in the clinic and front-line interaction with patients and other practitioners.
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  17. Ari R. Joffe, Meredith Bara, Natalie Anton & Nathan Nobis (2015). Expectations for Methodology and Translation of Animal Research: A Survey of Health Care Workers. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):29.
    Health care workers often perform, promote, and advocate use of public funds for animal research ; therefore, an awareness of the empirical costs and benefits of animal research is an important issue for HCW. We aim to determine what health-care-workers consider should be acceptable standards of AR methodology and translation rate to humans.
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  18. Ali Kazemian, Isabelle Berg, Christina Finkel, Shahram Yazdani, Hans-Florian Zeilhofer, Philipp Juergens & Stella Reiter-Theil (2015). How Much Dentists Are Ethically Concerned About Overtreatment; a Vignette-Based Survey in Switzerland. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):43.
    Overtreatment is when medical or dental services are provided with a higher volume or cost than is appropriate. This study aimed to investigate how a group of dentists in Switzerland, a wealthy country known to have high standards of healthcare including dentistry, evaluated the meaning of unnecessary treatments from an ethical perspective and, assessed the expected frequency of different possible behaviors among their peers.
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  19. Tapani Keränen, Arja Halkoaho, Emmi Itkonen & Anna-Maija Pietilä (2015). Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials: How Trial Documents Justify the Use of Randomisation and Placebo. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):2.
    Randomised clinical trials involve procedures such as randomisation, blinding, and placebo use, which are not part of standard medical care. Patients asked to participate in RCTs often experience difficulties in understanding the meaning of these and their justification.
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  20. Pauline S. C. Kouwenhoven, Natasja J. H. Raijmakers, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Judith A. C. Rietjens, Donald G. Van Tol, Suzanne van de Vathorst, Nienke de Graeff, Heleen A. M. Weyers, Agnes van der Heide & Ghislaine J. M. W. van Thiel (2015). Opinions About Euthanasia and Advanced Dementia: A Qualitative Study Among Dutch Physicians and Members of the General Public. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):7.
    The Dutch law states that a physician may perform euthanasia according to a written advance euthanasia directive when a patient is incompetent as long as all legal criteria of due care are met. This may also hold for patients with advanced dementia. We investigated the differing opinions of physicians and members of the general public on the acceptability of euthanasia in patients with advanced dementia.
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  21. Amos Laar & Debra DeBruin (2015). Ethics-Sensitivity of the Ghana National Integrated Strategic Response Plan for Pandemic Influenza. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):30.
    Many commentators call for a more ethical approach to planning for influenza pandemics. In the developed world, some pandemic preparedness plans have already been examined from an ethical viewpoint. This paper assesses the attention given to ethics issues by the Ghana National Integrated Strategic Plan for Pandemic Influenza.
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  22. Mireille Lavoie, Gaston Godin, Lydi-Anne Vézina-Im, Danielle Blondeau, Isabelle Martineau & Louis Roy (2015). Psychosocial Determinants of Physicians’ Intention to Practice Euthanasia in Palliative Care. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):6.
    Euthanasia remains controversial in Canada and an issue of debate among physicians. Most studies have explored the opinion of health professionals regarding its legalization, but have not investigated their intentions when faced with performing euthanasia. These studies are also considered atheoretical. The purposes of the present study were to fill this gap in the literature by identifying the psychosocial determinants of physicians’ intention to practice euthanasia in palliative care and verifying whether respecting the patient’s autonomy is important for physicians.
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  23. Laurie J. Legocki, William J. Meurer, Shirley Frederiksen, Roger J. Lewis, Valerie L. Durkalski, Donald A. Berry, William G. Barsan & Michael D. Fetters (2015). Clinical Trialist Perspectives on the Ethics of Adaptive Clinical Trials: A Mixed-Methods Analysis. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):27.
    In an adaptive clinical trial , key trial characteristics may be altered during the course of the trial according to predefined rules in response to information that accumulates within the trial itself. In addition to having distinguishing scientific features, adaptive trials also may involve ethical considerations that differ from more traditional randomized trials. Better understanding of clinical trial experts’ views about the ethical aspects of adaptive designs could assist those planning ACTs. Our aim was to elucidate the opinions of clinical (...)
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  24. Lillian Lillemoen & Reidar Pedersen (2015). Ethics Reflection Groups in Community Health Services: An Evaluation Study. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):25.
    Systematic ethics support in community health services in Norway is in the initial phase. There are few evaluation studies about the significance of ethics reflection on care. The aim of this study was to evaluate systematic ethics reflection in groups in community health , - from the perspectives of employees participating in the groups, the group facilitators and the service managers. The reflection groups were implemented as part of a research and development project.
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  25. Kathleen M. MacQueen, Anant Bhan, Janet Frohlich, Jessica Holzer, Jeremy Sugarman & $authorfirstName $authorlastName (2015). Evaluating Community Engagement in Global Health Research: The Need for Metrics. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundCommunity engagement in research has gained momentum as an approach to improving research, to helping ensure that community concerns are taken into account, and to informing ethical decision-making when research is conducted in contexts of vulnerability. However, guidelines and scholarship regarding community engagement are arguably unsettled, making it difficult to implement and evaluate.DiscussionWe describe normative guidelines on community engagement that have been offered by national and international bodies in the context of HIV-related research, which set the stage for similar work (...)
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  26. Neil McHugh, Rachel M. Baker, Helen Mason, Laura Williamson, Job van Exel, Rohan Deogaonkar, Marissa Collins & Cam Donaldson (2015). Extending Life for People with a Terminal Illness: A Moral Right and an Expensive Death? Exploring Societal Perspectives. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):14.
    Many publicly-funded health systems apply cost-benefit frameworks in response to the moral dilemma of how best to allocate scarce healthcare resources. However, implementation of recommendations based on costs and benefit calculations and subsequent challenges have led to ‘special cases’ with certain types of health benefits considered more valuable than others. Recent debate and research has focused on the relative value of life extensions for people with terminal illnesses. This research investigates societal perspectives in relation to this issue, in the UK.
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  27. Anne-Marie Mendyk, Julien Labreuche, Hilde Henon, Marie Girot, Charlotte Cordonnier, Alain Duhamel, Didier Leys & Régis Bordet (2015). Which Factors Influence the Resort to Surrogate Consent in Stroke Trials, and What Are the Patient Outcomes in This Context? BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):26.
    The provision of informed consent is a prerequisite for inclusion of a patient in a clinical research project. In some countries, the legislation on clinical research authorizes a third person to provide informed consent if the patient is unable to do so directly . This is the case during acute stroke, when the symptoms may prevent the patient from providing informed consent and thus require a third party to be approached. Identification of factors associated with the medical team’s decision to (...)
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  28. Bert Molewijk, Marit Helene Hem & Reidar Pedersen (2015). Dealing with Ethical Challenges: A Focus Group Study with Professionals in Mental Health Care. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):4.
    Little is known about how health care professionals deal with ethical challenges in mental health care, especially when not making use of a formal ethics support service. Understanding this is important in order to be able to support the professionals, to improve the quality of care, and to know in which way future ethics support services might be helpful.
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  29. Alwyn Mwinga & Keymanthri Moodley (2015). Engaging with Community Advisory Boards in Lusaka Zambia: Perspectives From the Research Team and CAB Members. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundThe use of a Community Advisory Board is one method of ensuring community engagement in community based research. To identify the process used to constitute CABs in Zambia, this paper draws on the perspectives of both research team members and CAB members from research groups who used CABs in Lusaka. Enabling and restricting factors impacting on the functioning of the CAB were identified.MethodsAll studies approved by the University of Zambia Bioethics Research Committee from 2008 – 2012 were reviewed to identify (...)
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  30. Petteri Nieminen, Saara Lappalainen, Pauliina Ristimäki, Markku Myllykangas & Anne-Mari Mustonen (2015). Opinions on Conscientious Objection to Induced Abortion Among Finnish Medical and Nursing Students and Professionals. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):17.
    Conscientious objection to participating in induced abortion is not present in the Finnish health care system or legislation unlike in many other European countries.
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  31. Anke J. M. Oerlemans, Nelleke van Sluisveld, Eric S. J. van Leeuwen, Hub Wollersheim, Wim J. M. Dekkers & Marieke Zegers (2015). Ethical Problems in Intensive Care Unit Admission and Discharge Decisions: A Qualitative Study Among Physicians and Nurses in the Netherlands. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):9.
    There have been few empirical studies into what non-medical factors influence physicians and nurses when deciding about admission and discharge of ICU patients. Information about the attitudes of healthcare professionals about this process can be used to improve decision-making about resource allocation in intensive care. To provide insight into ethical problems that influence the ICU admission and discharge process, we aimed to identify and explore ethical dilemmas healthcare professionals are faced with.
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  32. Clare Partridge (2015). BMC Medical Ethics Reviewer Acknowledgement 2014. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):5.
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  33. Corinna Porteri & Carlo Petrini (2015). Research Involving Subjects with Alzheimer’s Disease in Italy: The Possible Role of Family Members. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):12.
    Alzheimer’s disease is a very common, progressive and still incurable disease. Future possibilities for its cure lie in the promotion of research that will increase our knowledge of the disorder’s causes and lead to the discovery of effective remedies. Such research will necessarily involve individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. This raises the controversial issue of whether patients with Alzheimer’s disease are competent to give their consent for research participation.
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  34. Stuart Rennie, Mark Siedner, Joseph D. Tucker & Keymanthri Moodley (2015). The Ethics of Talking About ‘HIV Cure. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):18.
    In 2008, researchers reported that Timothy Brown , a man with HIV infection and leukemia, received a stem-cell transplant that removed HIV from his body as far as can be detected. In 2013, an infant born with HIV infection received anti-retroviral treatment shortly after birth, but was then lost to the health care system for the next six months. When tested for HIV upon return, the child had no detectable viral load despite cessation of treatment. These remarkable clinical developments have (...)
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  35. Sabine Salloch, Sebastian Wäscher, Jochen Vollmann & Jan Schildmann (2015). The Normative Background of Empirical-Ethical Research: First Steps Towards a Transparent and Reasoned Approach in the Selection of an Ethical Theory. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):20.
    Empirical-ethical research constitutes a relatively new field which integrates socio-empirical research and normative analysis. As direct inferences from descriptive data to normative conclusions are problematic, an ethical framework is needed to determine the relevance of the empirical data for normative argument. While issues of normative-empirical collaboration and questions of empirical methodology have been widely discussed in the literature, the normative methodology of empirical-ethical research has seldom been addressed. Based on our own research experience, we discuss one aspect of this normative (...)
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  36. Doris Schopper, Angus Dawson, Ross Upshur, Aasim Ahmad, Amar Jesani, Raffaella Ravinetto, Michael J. Segelid, Sunita Sheel & Jerome Singh (2015). Innovations in Research Ethics Governance in Humanitarian Settings. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):10.
    Médecins Sans Frontières is one of the world’s leading humanitarian medical organizations. The increased emphasis in MSF on research led to the creation of an ethics review board in 2001. The ERB has encouraged innovation in the review of proposals and the interaction between the ERB and the organization. This has led to some of the advances in ethics governance described in this paper.
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  37. Leslie Shanks, Claudio Moroni, Isabel C. Rivera, Debbie Price, Sifa B. Clementine & Giovanni Pintaldi (2015). Losing the Tombola”: A Case Study Describing the Use of Community Consultation in Designing the Study Protocol for a Randomised Controlled Trial of a Mental Health Intervention in Two Conflict-Affected Regions. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):38.
    Community consultation is increasingly recommended, and in some cases, required by ethical review boards for research that involves higher levels of ethical risk such as international research and research with vulnerable populations. In designing a randomised control trial of a mental health intervention using a wait list control, we consulted the community where the research would be undertaken prior to finalising the study protocol. The study sites were two conflict-affected locations: Grozny in the Chechen Republic and Kitchanga in eastern Democratic (...)
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  38. Manne Sjöstrand, Petter Karlsson, Lars Sandman, Gert Helgesson, Stefan Eriksson & Niklas Juth (2015). Conceptions of Decision-Making Capacity in Psychiatry: Interviews with Swedish Psychiatrists. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):34.
    Decision-making capacity is a key concept in contemporary healthcare ethics. Previous research has mainly focused on philosophical, conceptual issues or on evaluation of different tools for assessing patients’ capacity. The aim of the present study is to investigate how the concept and its normative role are understood in Swedish psychiatric care. Of special interest for present purposes are the relationships between decisional capacity and psychiatric disorders and between health law and practical ethics.
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  39. Manne Sjöstrand, Lars Sandman, Petter Karlsson, Gert Helgesson, Stefan Eriksson & Niklas Juth (2015). Ethical Deliberations About Involuntary Treatment: Interviews with Swedish Psychiatrists. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundInvoluntary treatment is a key issue in healthcare ethics. In this study, ethical issues relating to involuntary psychiatric treatment are investigated through interviews with Swedish psychiatrists.MethodsIn-depth interviews were conducted with eight Swedish psychiatrists, focusing on their experiences of and views on compulsory treatment. In relation to this, issues about patient autonomy were also discussed. The interviews were analysed using a descriptive qualitative approach.ResultsThe answers focus on two main aspects of compulsory treatment. Firstly, deliberations about when and why it was justifiable (...)
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  40. Ciara Staunton (2015). Informed Consent for HIV Cure Research in South Africa: Issues to Consider. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):3.
    South Africa has made great progress in the development of HIV/AIDS testing, treatment and prevention campaigns. Yet, it is clear that prevention and treatment campaigns alone are not enough to bring this epidemic under control.
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  41. Fiona A. Stevenson, William Gibson, Caroline Pelletier, Vasiliki Chrysikou & Sophie Park (2015). Reconsidering ‘Ethics’ and ‘Quality’ in Healthcare Research: The Case for an Iterative Ethical Paradigm. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):21.
    UK-based research conducted within a healthcare setting generally requires approval from the National Research Ethics Service. Research ethics committees are required to assess a vast range of proposals, differing in both their topic and methodology. We argue the methodological benchmarks with which research ethics committees are generally familiar and which form the basis of assessments of quality do not fit with the aims and objectives of many forms of qualitative inquiry and their more iterative goals of describing social processes/mechanisms and (...)
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  42. Kate M. Tan, Felicity S. Flack, Natasha L. Bear & Judy A. Allen (2015). An Evaluation of a Data Linkage Training Workshop for Research Ethics Committees. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):13.
    In Australia research projects proposing the use of linked data require approval by a Human Research Ethics Committee . A sound evaluation of the ethical issues involved requires understanding of the basic mechanics of data linkage, the associated benefits and risks, and the legal context in which it occurs. The rapidly increasing number of research projects utilising linked data in Australia has led to an urgent need for enhanced capacity of HRECs to review research applications involving this emerging research methodology. (...)
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  43. Paulina Tindana, Jantina de Vries, Megan Campbell, Katherine Littler, Janet Seeley, Patricia Marshall, Jennifer Troyer, Morisola Ogundipe, Vincent Pius Alibu, Aminu Yakubu & Michael Parker (2015). Community Engagement Strategies for Genomic Studies in Africa: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):24.
    Community engagement has been recognised as an important aspect of the ethical conduct of biomedical research, especially when research is focused on ethnically or culturally distinct populations. While this is a generally accepted tenet of biomedical research, it is unclear what components are necessary for effective community engagement, particularly in the context of genomic research in Africa.
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  44. Karim Traore, Susan Bull, Alassane Niare, Salimata Konate, Mahamadou A. Thera, Dominic Kwiatkowski, Michael Parker & Ogobara K. Doumbo (2015). Understandings of Genomic Research in Developing Countries: A Qualitative Study of the Views of MalariaGEN Participants in Mali. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundObtaining informed consent for participation in genomic research in low-income settings presents specific ethical issues requiring attention. These include the challenges that arise when providing information about unfamiliar and technical research methods, the implications of complicated infrastructure and data sharing requirements, and the potential consequences of future research with samples and data. This study investigated researchers’ and participants’ parents’ experiences of a consent process and understandings of a genome-wide association study of malaria involving children aged five and under in Mali. (...)
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  45. Julie Wintrup (2015). The Changing Landscape of Care: Does Ethics Education Have a New Role to Play in Health Practice? BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):22.
    In the UK, higher education and health care providers share responsibility for educating the workforce. The challenges facing health practice also face health education and as educators we are implicated, by the way we design curricula and through students’ experiences and their stories.
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