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Forthcoming articles
  1.  36
    Corey W. Dyck (forthcoming). Materialism in the Mainstream of Early German Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    Discussions of the reception of materialist thought in Germany in the first half of the 18th century tend to focus, naturally enough, upon the homegrown freethinkers who advanced the cause of Lucretius, Hobbes, and Spinoza in clandestine publications and frequently courted the ire of the state for doing so. If the philosophers belonging to the mainstream of German intellectual life in that period are accorded a place in the story, it is only insofar as they actively set themselves against the (...)
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  2. Lynda Gaudemard (forthcoming). Rico Vitz, Reforming the Art of Living: Nature, Virtue and Religion in Descartes's Epistemology. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
     
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  3.  12
    Mattia Riccardi (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Pluralism About Consciousness. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche’s view on consciousness is best captured by distinguishing different notions of consciousness. In other words, I propose that Nietzsche should be read as endorsing pluralism about consciousness. First, I consider the notion that is preeminent in his work and argue that the only kind of consciousness which may fit the characterization Nietzsche provides of this dominant notion is self-consciousness (S-consciousness). Second, I argue that in light of Nietzsche’s treatment of perceptions and sensations we (...)
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  4.  33
    Thomas Williams (forthcoming). Anselm's Quiet Radicalism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-20.
    It is characteristic of Anselm to adopt the formulations of his authorities while giving them meanings of his own, hiding conceptual disagreement by means of verbal echoes. Anselm's considerable originality sometimes goes unnoticed because readers see the standard Augustinian language and miss the fact that Anselm uses it to state un-Augustinian views. One striking instance of Anselm's quiet radicalism is his understanding of free choice and the fall. He seems to uphold standard Augustinian privation theory when he affirms that injustice (...)
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  5. Leo Catana (forthcoming). Review: Models of the History of Philosophy. Volume II: From Cartesian Age to Brucker, Ed. By Gregorio Piaia and Giovanni Santinello,(International Archives of the History of Ideas, 204). [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
     
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  6.  8
    Roger E. Eichorn (forthcoming). Academic Skepticism in Seventeenth-Century French Philosophy: The Charronian Legacy 1601–1662. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-5.
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  7.  7
    Tomas Ekenberg (forthcoming). Voluntary Action and Rational Sin in Anselm of Canterbury. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-16.
    Anselm of Canterbury holds that freedom of the will is a necessary condition for moral responsibility. This condition, however, turns out to be trivially fulfilled by all rational creatures at all times. In order to clarify the necessary conditions for moral responsibility, we must look more widely at his discussion of the nature of the will and of willed action. In this paper, I examine his theory of voluntariness by clarifying his account of the sin of Satan in De casu (...)
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  8.  3
    Rodolfo Garau (forthcoming). Springs, Nitre, and Conatus. The Role of the Heart in Hobbes's Physiology and Animal Locomotion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-26.
    This paper focuses on an understudied aspect of Hobbes's natural philosophy: his approach to the domain of life. I concentrate on the role assigned by Hobbes to the heart, which occupies a central role in both his account of human physiology and of the origin of animal locomotion. With this, I have three goals in mind. First, I aim to offer a cross-section of Hobbes's effort to provide a mechanistic picture of human life. Second, I aim to contextualize Hobbes's views (...)
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  9.  17
    Luca Gili (forthcoming). Aristotle's Theory of Abstraction. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-2.
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  10.  3
    Pavel Gregoric (forthcoming). Aristotle on Perceiving Objects. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  11.  6
    Heine Hansen (forthcoming). On the Road From Athens to Thebes Again: Some Thirteenth-Century Thinkers on Converse Relations. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    If Sophroniscus is the father of Socrates, then Socrates is the son of Sophroniscus. If Socrates is similar to Plato, then Plato is similar to Socrates. But how many relations does Sophroniscus and Socrates being so related involve? How many does Plato and Socrates being thus related? Is there a difference between the two cases? These are questions that have featured prominently in discussions of relations in recent years, but they are by no means new. Focusing on a text by (...)
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  12.  2
    David James (forthcoming). Independence and Property in Kant's Rechtslehre. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    I argue that the freedom which is to coexist with the freedom of choice of others in accordance with a universal law mentioned in Kant's Rechtslehre is not itself freedom of choice. Rather, it is the independence which is a condition of being able to exercise genuine free choice by not having to act in accordance with the choices of others. Kant's distinction between active and passive citizenship appears, however, to undermine this idea of independence, because the possession of a (...)
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  13.  6
    Nicholas Kahm (forthcoming). Aquinas on Quality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    For Kant, Aristotle's categories are arbitrary but brilliant and they do not ultimately correspond to extramental reality. For Aquinas, however, they are rational divisions of extramental being. In this perennial and ongoing dispute, the various positions seem to dissolve upon delving into the particulars of any one category. If, however, the categories are divisions of extramental being, it should be possible to offer plausible accounts of particular categories. I offer Aquinas's unstudied derivation of quality as a test case to see (...)
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  14.  9
    Christopher J. Martin (forthcoming). The Invention of Relations: Early Twelfth-Century Discussions of Aristotle's Account of Relatives. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    Aristotle's discussion of relatives in the Categories presented its eleventh- and twelfth-century readers with many puzzles. Their attempt to solve these puzzles and to develop a coherent account of the category led around the beginning of the twelfth century to the invention of relations as items which stand to relatives as qualities stand to qualified substances. In this paper, I first discuss the details of Aristotle's accounts of relatives and the related category of ‘situation’ and Boethius' commentary on them. I (...)
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  15.  11
    Thomas Moore (forthcoming). Wittgenstein and Perception. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  16.  6
    Kate Moran (forthcoming). Kant and Colonialism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  17.  11
    Massimo Mugnai (forthcoming). Leibniz's Principle of Identity of Indiscernibles. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  18.  9
    Steven Nadler (forthcoming). Spinoza on Lying and Suicide. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    Spinoza is often taken to claim that suicide is never a rational act, that a ‘free’ person acting by the guidance of reason will never terminate his/her own existence. Spinoza also defends the prima facie counterintuitive claim that the rational person will never act dishonestly. This second claim can, in fact, be justified when Spinoza's moral psychology and account of motivation are properly understood. Moreover, making sense of the free man's exception-less honesty in this way also helps to clarify how (...)
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  19.  2
    Paloma Pérez-Ilzarbe (forthcoming). The Place of Relations in Hieronymus Pardo's Semantics of Propositions. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-20.
    I examine a sixteenth-century development of the anti-realist propositional semantics which is based on the notion of ‘mode’. Pardo uses this notion to offer a personal interpretation of the Buridanian criticism of complexe significabilia. He develops a middle way between the reduction of the significate of propositions to particular things and the postulation of non-standard entities which are only complexly signifiable. The key to this middle way is Pardo's understanding of the notion of ‘mode’ as connoting a relation between individual (...)
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  20.  23
    Julia Peters (forthcoming). On Naturalism in Hegel's Philosophy of Spirit. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    In recent years, philosophers have become increasingly interested in a Hegelian approach to Aristotelian non-reductive naturalism. This paper points out a challenge faced by naturalist readings of Hegel's conception of spirit. For Hegel, spirit and nature are essentially distinct and even related in an antagonistic way. It is difficult to do full justice to this thought while at the same time reading Hegel as a naturalist. The paper also seeks to suggest a response to this challenge. Drawing on Hegel's account (...)
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  21.  4
    Kristopher G. Phillips (forthcoming). Descartes and the First Cartesians. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  22. Hsueh Qu (forthcoming). Prescription, Description, and Hume's Experimental Method. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    There seems a potential tension between Hume's naturalistic project and his normative ambitions. Hume adopts what I call a methodological naturalism: that is, the methodology of providing explanations for various phenomena based on natural properties and causes. This methodology takes the form of introducing ‘the experimental method of reasoning into moral subjects’, as stated in the subtitle of the Treatise; this ‘experimental method’ seems a paradigmatically descriptive one, and it remains unclear how Hume derives genuinely normative prescriptions from this methodology. (...)
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  23.  2
    Aurélien Robert (forthcoming). John of Jandun on Relations and Cambridge Changes. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    The paradigmatic examples of what we call nowadays ‘mere Cambridge changes’ are relational properties. If someone is on the left of a table at t − 1 and on the right of this table at t, the table does not undergo a physical change, but it has nonetheless new relational properties. What kind of relation lies behind this kind of change? Should we abandon the definition of identity as a set of permanent properties through time? This concern with identity and (...)
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  24.  7
    Joe Saunders (forthcoming). Kant on Mind, Action, & Ethics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-2.
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  25.  9
    Justin Steinberg (forthcoming). Affect, Desire, and Judgement in Spinoza's Account of Motivation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    Two priority problems frustrate our understanding of Spinoza on desire [cupiditas]. The first problem concerns the relationship between desire and the other two primary affects, joy [laetitia] and sadness [tristitia]. Desire seems to be the oddball of this troika, not only because, contrary to the very definition of an affect, desires do not themselves consist in changes in one's power of acting, but also because desire seems at once more and less basic than joy and sadness. The second problem concerns (...)
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  26.  2
    Riccardo Strobino (forthcoming). Avicenna on Knowledge , Certainty , Cause and the Relative. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    In his Kitāb al-Burhān, Avicenna discusses a theoretical framework broadly inspired by Aristotle's Posterior Analytics which brings together logic, epistemology and metaphysics. One of the central questions explored in the book is the problem of the relation between knowledge, certainty and causal explanation. Burhān 1.8, in particular, is devoted to the analysis of how certainty comes about in causal as opposed to non-causal contexts. The distinction is understood in Avicenna's system as one between cases in which the conclusion of an (...)
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  27.  3
    Jo Van Cauter (forthcoming). Wisdom as a Meditation on Life: Spinoza on Bacon and Civil History. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    In letter 37 to Johannes Bouwmeester, Spinoza identifies a historiola mentis à la Bacon as an important tool for distinguishing more easily between adequate and inadequate ideas. This paper contends that Spinoza's advice is to take into account Baconian-style ‘Civil History’ as providing instructive material for contemplating the variety, complexity, and persistency of human passionate behaviour. Specifically, it argues that Baconian civil history forms an integral part of Spinoza's reflections on provisional morality. Although for Spinoza, philosophical beatitude ultimately demands understanding (...)
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  28.  8
    R. L. Weed (forthcoming). The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Book Review). British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
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  29.  8
    Richard White (forthcoming). Nietzsche on Generosity and the Gift-Giving Virtue. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-17.
    Generosity and gift-giving are important themes in Nietzsche's philosophy. This essay focuses on Nietzsche's idea of the gift-giving virtue which is explicitly discussed at the end of Part One of Thus Spoke Zarathustra. I begin with a critical discussion of this section, and then I consider three different interpretations. Finally, I look at some ways in which the idea of the ‘gift-giving virtue’ may be understood in terms of spiritual generosity, leading to ‘sovereignty’ as its ultimate goal. Throughout, there are (...)
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  30.  4
    Joshua M. Wood (forthcoming). The Cambridge Companion to Hume's Treatise. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  31.  3
    Falk Wunderlich (forthcoming). Materialism in Late Enlightenment Germany: A Neglected Tradition Reconsidered. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    ABSTRACTLate Enlightenment German materialism has hardly attracted any scholarly attention in the past, in spite of the fact that there were quite a few exponents of it. In this paper, I identify the philosophically most important ones and examine to what extent they were connected with each other. In fact, there are local concentrations of materialists at universities and academic circles in Göttingen, Halle, and Gießen. I then discuss the spectrum of materialist positions held by them, from empiricist naturalism in (...)
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  32.  12
    Johannes Zachhuber (forthcoming). The Rise of the World Soul Theory in Modern German Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-9.
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