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Forthcoming articles
  1. James Russell Connelly (forthcoming). Wittgenstein: Comparisons & Context. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  2. Jeremy William Dunham (forthcoming). Idealism, Pragmatism, and the Will to Believe: Charles Renouvier and William James. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    This article investigates the history of the relation between idealism and pragmatism by examining the importance of the French idealist Charles Renouvier for the development of William James’s ‘Will to Believe’. By focusing on French idealism, we obtain a broader understanding of the kinds of idealism on offer in the nineteenth century. First, I show that Renouvier’s unique methodological idealism led to distinctively pragmatist doctrines and that his theory of certitude and its connection to freedom is worthy of reconsideration. Second, (...)
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  3. Scott Edgar (forthcoming). The Genesis of Neo-Kantianism: 1796–1880. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
  4. John J. Kaag (forthcoming). The Lot of the Beautiful: Pragmatism and Aesthetic Ideals. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    This article focuses on the intimate relationship between German aesthetic theory, particularly the philosophies of Kant and Schiller, and the pragmatic tradition of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. I argue that many aspects of Kantian aesthetic theory ? his development of reflective judgement, genius, and common sense ? are reflected in the thinking of C. S. Peirce. I conclude, however, that such a comparison risks selling short the way that German idealism influenced American thinkers and instead suggest that it (...)
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  5. Thomas Williams (forthcoming). Anselm's Quiet Radicalism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-20.
    It is characteristic of Anselm to adopt the formulations of his authorities while giving them meanings of his own, hiding conceptual disagreement by means of verbal echoes. Anselm's considerable originality sometimes goes unnoticed because readers see the standard Augustinian language and miss the fact that Anselm uses it to state un-Augustinian views. One striking instance of Anselm's quiet radicalism is his understanding of free choice and the fall. He seems to uphold standard Augustinian privation theory when he affirms that injustice (...)
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  6. Pierfrancesco Basile (forthcoming). Learning From Leibniz: Whitehead on Mind, Matter and Monads. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    Whitehead's system may be interpreted as a majestic attempt at recasting Leibniz's theory of monads in terms of sounder ontological categories. After a brief introductory section on the sources of Whitehead's knowledge of Leibniz's philosophy, the paper explains why Whitehead turned to Leibniz for metaphysical inspiration. Attention then shifts to Whitehead's understanding of the problems involved with Leibniz's theory of monads and his alternative explanation of monadic causation. Whitehead's endeavour to install windows in Leibniz's monads may not be entirely convincing, (...)
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  7. Francesco Bellucci (forthcoming). Neat, Swine, Sheep, and Deer: Mill and Peirce on Natural Kinds. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    In the earliest phase of his logical investigations, Peirce adopts Mill's doctrine of real Kinds as discussed in the System of Logic and adapts it to the logical conceptions he was then developing. In Peirce's definition of natural class, a crucial role is played by the notion of information: a natural class is a class of which some non-analytical proposition is true. In Peirce's hands, Mill's distinction between connotative and non-connotative terms becomes a distinction between symbolic and informative and pseudo-symbolic (...)
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  8. Travis Butler (forthcoming). Socrates and Philosophical Practice. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    Interpreters of the Phaedo often cite the Pythagorean context of the dialogue as a source of influence on the demanding conception of philosophy defended therein. Sandra Peterson offers a striking account of that influence: the Pythagorean sympathies of Socrates's interlocutors lead him to defend a conception of philosophy that captures their commitments, but that he himself rejects. Call this the Strong Influence Thesis. Peterson defends SIT by attempting to demonstrate a mismatch between the conception of philosophy espoused by Socrates in (...)
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  9. Leo Catana (forthcoming). Review: Models of the History of Philosophy. Volume II: From Cartesian Age to Brucker, Ed. By Gregorio Piaia and Giovanni Santinello,(International Archives of the History of Ideas, 204). [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
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  10. Georg Cavallar (forthcoming). Kant's Politics in Context. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  11. James A. Clarke (forthcoming). Thinking Through the Wissenschaftslehre: Themes From Fichte's Early Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  12. Giuseppina D'Oro (forthcoming). Unlikely Bedfellows? Collingwood, Carnap and the Internal/External Distinction. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-16.
    Idealism is often associated with the kind of metaphysical system building which was successfully disposed of by logical positivism. As Hume's fork was intended to deliver a serious blow to Leibnizian metaphysics so logical positivism invoked the verificationist principle against the reawakening of metaphysics, in the tradition of German and British idealism. In the light of this one might reasonably wonder what Carnap's pragmatism could possibly have in common with Collingwood's idealism. After all, Carnap is often seen as a champion (...)
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  13. Shannon Dea (forthcoming). A House at War Against Itself: Absolute Versus Pluralistic Idealism in Spinoza, Peirce, James and Royce. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    In this paper, I elaborate affinities between Peirce, Spinoza and Royce, in order to illuminate the division between Peirce's and James's expressions of idealism. James contrasted Spinoza's and Royce's absolute idealism with his and Peirce's pluralistic idealism. I triangulate among Peirce, Spinoza and Royce to show that, contra James's view, Peirce himself was more at home in the absolutistic camp. In Section 2, I survey Peirce's discussions of Spinoza's pragmatism and of the divide within pragmatism Peirce perceived to obtain. In (...)
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  14. Tomas Ekenberg (forthcoming). Voluntary Action and Rational Sin in Anselm of Canterbury. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-16.
    Anselm of Canterbury holds that freedom of the will is a necessary condition for moral responsibility. This condition, however, turns out to be trivially fulfilled by all rational creatures at all times. In order to clarify the necessary conditions for moral responsibility, we must look more widely at his discussion of the nature of the will and of willed action. In this paper, I examine his theory of voluntariness by clarifying his account of the sin of Satan in De casu (...)
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  15. Dina Emundts (forthcoming). Hegel as a Pragmatist. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    In this paper, I want to focus on the question whether Hegel's philosophy shares its main characteristics with pragmatism. I will answer this question affirmatively. In the first part, I sketch the understanding of pragmatism that allows me to call Hegel a pragmatist. In the second part, I turn to the specific project of Hegel's Phenomenology and try to substantiate the claim that Hegel is a pragmatist in this sense. I end with a discussion about the limits of my thesis (...)
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  16. Ido Geiger (forthcoming). How Do We Acquire Moral Knowledge? Is Knowing Our Duty Ever Passive? – Two Questions for Martin Sticker. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-8.
    Martin Sticker's discussion of the common moral agent contains much that I find insightful, true and significant. As a response to his paper, I focus on two important issues that nevertheless separate us: Sticker claims that knowing our duty can be mere passive awareness and that it indeed is passive as awareness of the special status of humanity. I deny that knowing our duty is ever passive. He further claims that the common universalization test is the paradigmatic way active agents (...)
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  17. Mason Golden (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Philosophy of History. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  18. Michelle Jenkins (forthcoming). Early Education in Plato's Republic. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    In this paper, I reconsider the commonly held position that the early moral education of the Republic is arational since the youths of the Kallipolis do not yet have the capacity for reason. I argue that, because they receive an extensive mathematical education alongside their moral education, the youths not only have a capacity for reason but that capacity is being developed in their early education. If this is so, though, then we must rethink why the early moral education is (...)
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  19. Nicholas Kahm (forthcoming). Aquinas on Quality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    For Kant, Aristotle's categories are arbitrary but brilliant and they do not ultimately correspond to extramental reality. For Aquinas, however, they are rational divisions of extramental being. In this perennial and ongoing dispute, the various positions seem to dissolve upon delving into the particulars of any one category. If, however, the categories are divisions of extramental being, it should be possible to offer plausible accounts of particular categories. I offer Aquinas's unstudied derivation of quality as a test case to see (...)
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  20. Steven Levine (forthcoming). Hegel, Dewey, and Habits. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-25.
    In this paper, I argue against Terry Pinkard's account of the relation between Deweyian pragmatism and Hegelian idealism. Instead of thinking that their affinity concerns the issue of normative authority, as Pinkard does, I argue that we should trace their affinity to Dewey's appropriation of Hegel's naturalism, especially his theory of habits. Pinkard is not in a position to appreciate this affinity because he misreads Dewey as an instrumentalist, and his social-constructivist account of Hegel – which he shares with Pippin (...)
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  21. Mogens Lærke (forthcoming). Five Figures of Folding: Deleuze on Leibniz's Monadological Metaphysics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    This article is about Gilles Deleuze's book Le Pli. Leibniz et le Baroque from 1988. It shows how Deleuze's notion of folding captures some basic intuitions in Leibniz and how they relate to each other. To this purpose, I propose five figures, all referring to the same basic fold, all illustrating how the consideration of such figures allows developing central elements of Leibniz's monadology. These figures can help, I hope, alleviate some of the fundamental difficulties in understanding Deleuze's approach to (...)
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  22. Sara Magrin (forthcoming). Plotinus on the Inner Sense. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-24.
    Recently, there has been a growing interest in ancient views on consciousness and particularly in their influence on medieval and early modern philosophers. Here I suggest a new interpretation of Plotinus’s account of consciousness which, if correct, may help us to reconsider his role in the history of the notion of the inner sense. I argue that, while explaining how our divided soul can be a unitary subject of the states and activities of its parts, Plotinus develops an original account (...)
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  23. Peter Olen & Stephen Turner (forthcoming). Durkheim, Sellars, and the Origins of Collective Intentionality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    Wilfrid Sellars read and annotated Celestine Bouglé’s Evolution of Values, translated by his mother with an introduction by his father. The book expounded Émile Durkheim's account of morality and elaborated his account of origins of value in collective social life. Sellars replaced elements of this account in constructing his own conception of the relationship between the normative and community, but preserved a central one: the idea that conflicting collective and individual intentions could be found in the same person. These notoriously (...)
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  24. Julia Peters (forthcoming). On Naturalism in Hegel's Philosophy of Spirit. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    In recent years, philosophers have become increasingly interested in a Hegelian approach to Aristotelian non-reductive naturalism. This paper points out a challenge faced by naturalist readings of Hegel's conception of spirit. For Hegel, spirit and nature are essentially distinct and even related in an antagonistic way. It is difficult to do full justice to this thought while at the same time reading Hegel as a naturalist. The paper also seeks to suggest a response to this challenge. Drawing on Hegel's account (...)
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  25. Benedict E. Rumbold (forthcoming). Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  26. Peter Simons (forthcoming). Bolzano's Monadology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-11.
    Bernard Bolzano, known in his lifetime as ‘the Bohemian Leibniz’, is best known as a logician and mathematician, but he also developed a monadology in which the monads, which he called ‘atoms’, have spatial location and physical properties. This essay summarizes and assesses his monadology.
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  27. Martin Sticker (forthcoming). The Moral-Psychology of the Common Agent – A Reply to Ido Geiger. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-14.
    Ido Geiger's paper ‘What it is the Use of the Universal Law Formula of the Categorical Imperative?’ is part of a growing trend in Kant scholarship, which stresses the significance of the rational competence of ordinary human beings. I argue that this approach needs to take into account that the common agent is an active reasoner who has the means to find out what she ought to do. The purpose of my paper is to show how universality already figures in (...)
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  28. Preston Stovall (forthcoming). Inference by Analogy and the Progress of Knowledge: From Reflection to Determination in Judgements of Natural Purpose. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-29.
    In this paper, I argue that Darwin's On the Origin of Species can be interpreted as the culmination of an extended exercise of what Kant called ‘the reflecting power of judgement’ that issued in a form of reasoning that Hegel associates with inference by analogy and that Peirce associates with hypothesis and later assimilates to abduction. After some exegetical and rationally reconstructive work, I support this reading by showing that Darwin's theory of natural selection gave us a way of understanding (...)
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  29. Emily Thomas (forthcoming). British Idealist Monadologies and the Reality of Time: Hilda Oakeley Against McTaggart, Leibniz, and Others. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-19.
    In the early twentieth century, a rare strain of British idealism emerged which took Leibniz's Monadology as its starting point. This paper discusses a variant of that strain, offered by Hilda Oakeley. I set Oakeley's monadology in its philosophical context and discuss a key point of conflict between Oakeley and her fellow monadologists: the unreality of time. Oakeley argues that time is fundamentally real, a thesis arguably denied by Leibniz and subsequent monadologists, and by all other British idealists. This paper (...)
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  30. Emily Thomas (forthcoming). Hilda Oakeley on Idealism, History and the Real Past. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    In the early twentieth century, Hilda Diana Oakeley set out a new kind of British idealism. Oakeley is an idealist in the sense that she holds mind to actively contribute to the features of experience, but she also accepts that there is a world independent of mind. One of her central contributions to the idealist tradition is her thesis that minds construct our experiences using memory. This paper explores the theses underlying her idealism, and shows how they are intricately connected (...)
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  31. R. L. Weed (forthcoming). The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Book Review). British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
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  32. Reed Winegar (forthcoming). Kant's Criticisms of Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    According to recent commentators like Paul Guyer, Kant agrees with Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion that physico-theology can never provide knowledge of God and that the concept of God, nevertheless, provides a useful heuristic principle for scientific enquiry. This paper argues that Kant, far from agreeing with Hume, criticizes Hume's Dialogues for failing to prove that physico-theology can never yield knowledge of God and that Kant correctly views Hume's Dialogues as a threat to, rather than an anticipation of, his own (...)
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