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Forthcoming articles
  1.  11
    Kenneth Boyd & Diana Heney (forthcoming). Rascals, Triflers, and Pragmatists: Developing a Peircean Account of Assertion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    While the topic of assertion has recently received a fresh wave of interest from Peirce scholars, to this point no systematic account of Peirce’s view of assertion has been attempted. We think that this is a lacuna that ought to be filled. Doing so will help make better sense of Peirce’s pragmatism; further, what is hidden amongst various fragments is a robust pragmatist theory of assertion with unique characteristics that may have significant contemporary value. Here we aim to uncover this (...)
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  2.  15
    John J. Callanan (forthcoming). The Poverty of Conceptual Truth: Kant’s Analytic/Synthetic Distinction and the Limits of Metaphysics. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  3.  3
    Zachary Micah Gartenberg (forthcoming). Realism and Individualism: Charles S. Peirce and the Threat of Modern Nominalism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  4.  11
    Lynda Gaudemard (forthcoming). Rico Vitz, Reforming the Art of Living: Nature, Virtue and Religion in Descartes's Epistemology. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  5. Lorenzo Greco (forthcoming). A Powerless Conscience: Hume on Reflection and Acting Conscientiously. British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    If one looks for the notion of conscience in Hume, there appears to be a contrast between the standard, loose use of it that can be found in his The History of England, and the stricter use of it Hume makes in his philosophical works such as A Treatise of Human Nature and An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals. It is my belief that, notwithstanding the alleged problems Hume’s philosophy raises for a notion such as conscience, it is nonetheless (...)
     
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  6.  10
    Matthew A. Leisinger (forthcoming). Locke's Arguments Against the Freedom to Will. British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    In sections 2.21.23-25 of An Essay concerning Human Understanding, John Locke considers and rejects two ways in which we might be “free to will”, which correspond to the Thomistic distinction between freedom of exercise and freedom of specification. In this paper, I examine Locke’s arguments in detail. In the first part, I argue for a non-developmental reading of Locke’s argument against freedom of exercise. Locke’s view throughout all five editions of the Essay is that we do not possess freedom of (...)
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  7.  4
    Charlotte Alderwick (forthcoming). Interanimations: Receiving Modern German Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  8.  16
    Hanne Appelqvist (forthcoming). Representation and Reality in Wittgenstein's. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  9.  2
    Dennis Vanden Auweele (forthcoming). Comprehensive Commentary on Kant’s Religion Within the Bounds of Bare Reason. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  10.  5
    Stefan Brandt (forthcoming). Sellars and Quine on Empiricism and Conceptual Truth1. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-25.
    ABSTRACTI compare Sellars’s criticism of the ‘myth of the given’ with Quine’s criticism of the ‘two dogmas’ of empiricism, that is, the analytic–synthetic distinction and reductionism. In Sections I to III, I present Quine’s and Sellars’s views. In IV to X, I discuss similarities and differences in their views. In XI to XII, I show that Sellars’s arguments against the ‘myth of the given’ are incompatible with Quine’s rejection of the analytic–synthetic distinction.
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  11. Leo Catana (forthcoming). Review: Models of the History of Philosophy. Volume II: From Cartesian Age to Brucker, Ed. By Gregorio Piaia and Giovanni Santinello,(International Archives of the History of Ideas, 204). [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
     
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  12.  5
    Frank Chouraqui (forthcoming). Nietzsche on Mind and Nature. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  13.  2
    Joshua Cockayne (forthcoming). Søren Kierkegaard: Subjectivity, Irony, and the Crisis of Modernity. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  14.  3
    Joshua Cockayne (forthcoming). The Naked Self: Kierkegaard and Personal Identity. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  15.  1
    Joshua Cockayne (forthcoming). Contemporaneity and Communion: Kierkegaard on the Personal Presence of Christ. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    ABSTRACTSøren Kierkegaard’s claim that having faith requires being contemporary with Christ is one of the most important, yet difficult to interpret claims across his entire authorship. How can one be contemporary with a figure who existed more than two millennia ago? A prominent answer to this question is that contemporaneity with Christ is achieved through a kind of imaginative co-presence made possible by reading Scripture. However, I argue, this ignores what Kierkegaard thinks about Christ as a living agent, and not (...)
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  16.  4
    Demetrios Dedes (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Gemistos Plethon: Platonism in Late Byzantium, Between Hellenism and Orthodoxy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  17.  6
    Lynda Gaudemard (forthcoming). Reforming the Art of Living: Nature, Virtue, and Religion in Descartes's Epistemology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  18.  6
    Tom Giesbers (forthcoming). Briefwechsel – Nachlaß – Dokumente. Briefwechsel. Reihe I: Text. Band 10: Briefwechsel Juni 1792 Bis September 1794. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-5.
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  19.  4
    John Grey (forthcoming). Reply to Nadler: Spinoza and the Metaphysics of Suicide. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-9.
    ABSTRACTSteven Nadler has argued that Spinoza can, should, and does allow for the possibility of suicide committed as a free and rational action. Given that the conatus is a striving for perfection, Nadler argues, there are cases in which reason guides a person to end her life based on the principle of preferring the lesser evil. If so, Spinoza’s disparaging statements about suicide are intended to apply only to some cases, whereas in others he would grant that suicide is dictated (...)
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  20.  5
    Hatfield Gary (forthcoming). Descartes: New Thoughts on the Senses. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    ABSTRACTDescartes analysed the mind into various faculties or powers, including pure intellect, imagination, senses, and will. This article focuses on his account of the sensory power, in relation to its Aristotelian background. Descartes accepted from the Aristotelians that the senses serve to preserve the body by detecting benefits and harms. He rejected the scholastic Aristotelian sensory ontology of resembling species, or ‘forms without matter’. For the visual sense, Descartes offered a mechanistic ontology and a partially mechanized account of sensory processes, (...)
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  21.  5
    Marta Heckel (forthcoming). Plato on the Role of Contradiction in Education. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-19.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I will look at two passages from the discussion of education in Book VII of Plato’s Republic: 523b-524d and 537e-539d. These passages, when taken together, present a puzzle for the coherency of the educational programme Socrates describes. Both discuss contradiction. One says that contradiction is educationally edifying, the other, that it is corrupting. This sounds like a contradiction about contradiction. As far as I know, no one has noticed this puzzle before. By the end of this paper, (...)
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  22.  8
    Stephen Howard (forthcoming). Why Did Leibniz Fail to Complete His Dynamics? British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-19.
    ABSTRACTLeibniz’s ‘new science of dynamics’ is typically taken to have been completed in the late monadological metaphysics. On this view, stemming from Martial Gueroult and continuing in the recent interpretations of Robert Adams and Pauline Phemister, Leibniz accomplished his dynamics in his later account of physical forces as merely phenomenal modifications of monadic, metaphysical forces. This paper argues, by contrast, that Leibniz considered the dynamics to be an unfinished project: this is evident in statements from throughout his mature period until (...)
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  23.  1
    Fiona Hughes (forthcoming). Reversibility and Chiasm: False Equivalents? An Alternative Approach to Understanding Difference in Merleau-Ponty’s Late Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-24.
    ABSTRACTThe chiasm is usually considered the key notion for Merleau-Ponty’s later philosophy. I argue against a common conclusion, namely that ‘the chiasm’ is equivalent to ‘reversibility’. Even when the two terms are not taken as interchangeable, the precise nature of their relation has not been adequately established. Focusing exclusively on ‘reversibility’ has implications for a range of philosophical issues, including relations between self and other. The danger of substituting one term for the other is that existential relations are construed as (...)
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  24.  6
    Sarah Hutton (forthcoming). Salving the Phenomena of Mind: Energy, Hegemonikon, and Sympathy in Cudworth. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    ABSTRACTRalph Cudworth’s theory of mind was the most fully developed philosophical psychology among the Cambridge Platonists. Like his seventeenth-century contemporaries, Cudworth discussed mental powers in terms of soul rather than mind and considered the function of the soul to be not merely intellectual, but vital and moral. Cudworth conceived the soul as a single self-determining unit which combined many powers. He developed this against a philosophical agenda set by Descartes and Hobbes. But he turned to ancient philosophy, especially the philosophy (...)
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  25.  9
    Naoya Iwata (forthcoming). Clitophon's Challenge: Dialectic in Plato's Meno, Phaedo, and Republic. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  26.  1
    Katherina Kinzel (forthcoming). Wilhelm Windelband and the Problem of Relativism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-24.
    ABSTRACTThis paper analyzes the shifts in Wilhelm Windelband’s ‘critical philosophy of values’ as it developed hand in hand with his understanding of relativism. The paper has two goals. On the one hand, by analyzing the role that relativism played in his philosophical project, it seeks to contribute to a better understanding of Windelband's intellectual development in the context of historicism and Neo-Kantianism. On the other hand, by highlighting Windelband’s contribution to the understanding of relativism, it sheds light on an important (...)
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  27.  9
    Patricia Kitcher (forthcoming). Kant on the Faculty of Apperception. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-28.
    ABSTRACTAlthough I begin with a brief look at the idea that as a faculty of mind, apperception must be grounded in some power of the soul, my focus is on claims about the alleged noumenal import of some of Kant’s particular theses about the faculty of apperception: it is inexplicable, immaterial, and can provide evidence that humans are members of the intelligible world. I argue that when the claim of inexplicability is placed in the context of Kant’s standards for transcendental (...)
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  28.  1
    Ian Leask (forthcoming). Stoicism Unbound: Cicero’s Academica in Toland’s Pantheisticon. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    ABSTRACTThis article shows how and why John Toland’s Pantheisticon presents a version of Stoicism that locates Stoic ethics in terms of its ‘original’, naturalistic, foundation and devoid of any reconciliation with Christianity. As the article demonstrates, Toland’s account – based on Cicero’s Academica – stands opposed to the Christianized version of Stoicism that had dominated so much seventeenth-century discourse: in effect, Toland restores the materialism that was incompatible with neo-Stoicism. Furthermore, the article also suggests that this ‘restoration’ can be taken (...)
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  29.  4
    Stephen K. McLeod (forthcoming). Dummett and Frege on Sense and Selbständigkeit. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    ABSTRACTAs part of his attack on Frege’s ‘myth’ that senses reside in the third realm, Dummett alleges that Frege’s view that all objects are selbständig is an underlying mistake, since some objects depend upon others. Whatever the merits of Dummett’s other arguments against Frege’s conception of sense, this objection fails. First, Frege’s view that senses are third-realm entities is not traceable to his view that all objects are selbständig. Second, while Frege recognizes that there are objects that are dependent upon (...)
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  30. Katrina Mitcheson (forthcoming). Scepticism and Self-Transformation in Nietzsche – on the Uses and Disadvantages of a Comparison to Pyrrhonian Scepticism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    ABSTRACTScepticism is central to Nietzsche’s philosophical project, both as a tool of criticism and, through its role in self-transformation, as a tool for responding to criticism. While its importance in his thought and its complexity have been acknowledged, exactly what kind of scepticism Nietzsche calls for still stands in need of analysis. Jessica Berry’s [Nietzsche and the Ancient Skeptical Tradition. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011] comparison between Nietzsche and Pyrrhonian scepticism recognized the importance of the practical dimension of Nietzschean (...)
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  31.  10
    Kristopher G. Phillips (forthcoming). Historical Dictionary of Descartes and Cartesian Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  32.  8
    Sheldon Richmond (forthcoming). Spinoza’s Critique of Religion and its Heirs: Marx, Benjamin, and Adorno. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  33.  5
    Andrea Sangiacomo (forthcoming). The Young Spinoza: A Metaphysician in the Making. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  34.  32
    Justin B. Shaddock (forthcoming). Recent Work on Kant's Transcendental Deduction. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-10.
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  35.  3
    Mark Sinclair (forthcoming). The Origin of Time: Heidegger and Bergson. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  36.  1
    Sandra L. Visser (forthcoming). Freedom and Self-Creation: Anselmian Libertarianism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  37. R. L. Weed (forthcoming). The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Book Review). British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
     
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  38.  14
    John P. Wright (forthcoming). Hume: An Intellectual Biography. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-10.
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  39.  24
    Johannes Zachhuber (forthcoming). The Rise of the World Soul Theory in Modern German Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-9.
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