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Forthcoming articles
  1. Christian Munthe & Susanna Radovic (forthcoming). The Return of Lombroso? Ethical Aspects of Preventive Forensic Screening. Public Health Ethics:phu048.
    The vision of legendary criminologist Cesare Lombroso to use scientific theories of individual causes of crime as a basis for screening and prevention programmes targeting individuals at risk for future criminal behaviour has resurfaced, following advances in genetics, neuroscience and psychiatric epidemiology. This article analyses this idea and maps its ethical implications from a public health ethical standpoint. Twenty-seven variants of the new Lombrosian vision of forensic screening and prevention are distinguished, and some scientific and technical limitations are noted. Some (...)
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  2. Emily Bell, Gail Andrew, Nina Di Pietro, Albert E. Chudley, James N. Reynolds & Eric Racine (forthcoming). It’s a Shame! Stigma Against Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Examining the Ethical Implications for Public Health Practices and Policies. Public Health Ethics:phv012.
    Stigma can influence the prevention and identification of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, a leading cause of developmental delay in North America. Understanding the effects of public health practices and policies on stigma is imperative. We reviewed social science and biomedical literatures to understand the nature of stigma in FASD and its relevance from an ethics standpoint in matters of health practices and policies. We propose a descriptive model of stigma in FASD and note current knowledge gaps; discuss the ethical implications (...)
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  3. Joanna Coast & Richard D. Smith (forthcoming). Distributional Considerations in Economic Responses to Antimicrobial Resistance. Public Health Ethics:phv004.
    Antimicrobial resistance is a major and increasing problem globally. Economics has engaged with this issue increasingly over the last 20 years. Much of this concerns assessments of the cost of various forms of resistance, but it also includes economic analyses of interventions and policies designed to contain resistance. Analysis has, however, thus far largely neglected possible distributional issues associated with such interventions and analysis. The article explores three normative bases for the conduct of economic analysis: welfarism; extra-welfarism focused on health (...)
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  4. Norman Daniels (forthcoming). Equity and Population Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  5. Angus Dawson (forthcoming). Vaccination Ethics. Public Health Ethics.
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  6. Michael G. Head, Stephen L. Walker, Ananth Nalabanda, Jennifer Bostock & Jackie A. Cassell (forthcoming). Researching Scabies Outbreaks Among People in Residential Care and Lacking Capacity to Consent: A Case Study. Public Health Ethics:phv011.
    Infectious disease outbreaks in residential care are complex to manage and difficult to control. Research in this setting that includes individuals who lack capacity must conform to national legislation. We report here on our study that is investigating outbreaks of scabies, an itchy skin infection, in the residential care setting in the southeast of England. There appears to be a gap in legislative advice regarding the inclusion of people who lack capacity in research that takes place during time-limited acute scenarios (...)
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  7. Dorothee Horstkötter, Wybo Dondorp & Guido de Wert (forthcoming). Medicalization, Demedicalization and Beyond: Antisocial Behaviour and the Case of the Dutch Youth Law. Public Health Ethics:phv018.
    Youth antisocial behaviour is frequently considered to be displayed by children and adolescents who suffer from behavioural disorders. Consequently, attempts to reduce ASB have increasingly comprised mental health interventions. Moreover, early signalling of children at risk and early prevention of behavioural problems are regarded as crucial remedies. Critical investigations of these developments, however, are in particular concerned with the consequent medicalization of society and the behaviour exhibited by infants, children and adolescents. Consequently, the new Dutch youth law even refers to (...)
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  8. Stephen John (forthcoming). The Moral Physiology of Inequality: Response to ‘Fighting Status Inequalities: Non-Domination Vs Non-Interference. Public Health Ethics:phv006.
    In this article, I respond to ‘Fighting Status Inequalities’. I first note a niggle about the paper’s assumption that lowering socio-economic inequalities will lower the social gradient in health. I then suggest two further ways in which neorepublicanism may relate to social epidemiology: in terms of ‘moral physiology’ and through analysing which inequalities are unjust.
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  9. Anthony Kessel & Carolyn Stephens (forthcoming). Environment, Ethics and Public Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  10. Ana Komparic, Maxwell J. Smith & Alison Thompson (forthcoming). An Ethical Justification for Expanding the Notion of Effectiveness in Vaccine Post-Market Monitoring: Insights From the HPV Vaccine in Canada. Public Health Ethics:phu049.
    Health regulators must carefully monitor the real-world safety and effectiveness of marketed vaccines through post-market monitoring in order to protect the public’s health and promote those vaccines that best achieve public health goals. Yet, despite the fact that vaccines used in collective immunization programmes should be assessed in the context of a public health response, post-market effectiveness monitoring is often limited to assessing immunogenicity or limited programmatic features, rather than assessing effectiveness across populations. We argue that post-market monitoring ought to (...)
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  11. Ross MacKenzie & Wendy Rogers (forthcoming). Potential Conflict of Interest and Bias in the RACGP’s Smoking Cessation Guidelines: Are GPs Provided with the Best Advice on Smoking Cessation for Their Patients? Public Health Ethics:phv010.
    Patient visits are an important opportunity for general practitioners to discuss the risks of smoking and cessation strategies. In Australia, the guidelines on cessation published by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners represent a key resource for GPs in this regard. The predominant message of the Guidelines is that pharmacotherapy should be recommended as first-line therapy for smokers expressing an interest in quitting. This, however, ignores established evidence about the success of unassisted quitting. Our analysis of the Guidelines identifies (...)
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  12. John McMillan (forthcoming). Public Health Research Ethics. Public Health Ethics.
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  13. Michael R. Millar (forthcoming). The Choice to Travel: Health Tourists and the Spread of Antibiotic Resistance. Public Health Ethics:phv003.
    Individuals are at risk of acquiring untreatable agents of infection when they travel to countries where antibiotic-resistant agents of infection are prevalent, and particularly when they travel for healthcare. Uncertainty with respect to the overall political and economic consequences seems to underlie the reluctance of public health authorities to issue relevant travel advisories. The conditions of choice, the act of choice and the consequences of choice can each be a primary focus of ethical appraisal of public health policy. The ‘value (...)
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  14. Keith Syrett (forthcoming). Comment on Jennings, ‘Right Relation and Right Recognition in Public Health Ethics: Thinking Through the Republic of Health. Public Health Ethics:phv009.
    This paper offers a brief comment on Jennings’ preceding paper, focusing on the capacity of a republican approach to public health ethics to facilitate reconceptualization of the right to health in situations of limited resources through a relational reading.
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  15. Marcel Verweij & A. Dawson (forthcoming). Infectious Disease Control. Public Health Ethics.
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  16. A. M. Viens & Jasper Littmann (forthcoming). Is Antimicrobial Resistance a Slowly Emerging Disaster? Public Health Ethics:phv015.
    The problem of antimicrobial resistance is so dire that people are predicting that the era of antibiotics may be coming to an end, ushering in a ‘post-antibiotic’ era. A comprehensive policy response is therefore urgently needed. A part of this response will require framing the problem in such a way that adequately reflects its nature as well as encompassing an approach that has the best prospect of success. This paper considers framing the problem as a slowly emerging disaster, including its (...)
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  17. Tom Walker (forthcoming). Paternalism and Populations. Public Health Ethics:phv019.
    It is relatively uncontroversial that some public health policies are paternalistic. Furthermore, that they are paternalistic is often taken to show that they are morally wrong. In this article I challenge this position. The article starts by arguing that given standard definitions of paternalism it is unclear why such policies count as paternalistic. Whilst it might appear that they impose restrictions on what individuals can, or cannot, do for their own good, this is not the case. The reason for this (...)
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  18. Stephen Wilkinson (forthcoming). Selective Reproduction, Eugenics, and Public Health. Public Health Ethics.
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