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Forthcoming articles
  1.  9
    Lynette Reid (forthcoming). Answering the Empirical Challenge to Arguments for Universal Health Coverage Based in Health Equity. Public Health Ethics:phv038.
    Temkin asks how we should distribute resources between the social determinants of health and health care; Sreenivasan argues that if our goal is fair opportunity, funding universal health coverage is the wrong policy. He argues that social equality in health has not improved under UHC and concludes that fair opportunity would be better served by using the resources to address the SDOH instead. His criticism applies more broadly than he claims: it applies to any argument for UHC based on health (...)
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  2.  11
    S. Andrew Schroeder (forthcoming). Value Choices in Summary Measures of Population Health. Public Health Ethics:phw032.
    Summary measures of health, such as the quality-adjusted life year and disability-adjusted life year, have long been known to incorporate a number of value choices. In this paper, though, I show that the value choices in the construction of such measures extend far beyond what is generally recognized. In showing this, I hope both to improve the understanding of those measures by epidemiologists, health economists and policy-makers, and also to contribute to the general debate about the extent to which such (...)
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  3.  73
    Alex Voorhoeve (forthcoming). Why One Should Count Only Claims with Which One Can Sympathize. Public Health Ethics:phw006.
    When one faces competing claims of varying strength on public resources for health, which claims count? This paper proposes the following answer. One should count, or aggregate, a person’s claim just in case one could sympathize with her desire to prioritize her own claim over the strongest competing claim. It argues that this principle yields appealing case judgments and has a plausible grounding in both sympathetic identification with each person, taken separately, and respect for the person for whom most is (...)
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  4.  6
    Anna Alexandrova (forthcoming). Is Well-Being Measurable After All? Public Health Ethics:phw015.
    In Valuing Health, Dan Hausman argues that well-being is not measurable, at least not in the way that science and policy would require. His argument depends on a demanding conception of well-being and on a pessimistic verdict upon the existing measures of subjective well-being. Neither of these reasons, I argue, warrant as much skepticism as Hausman professes.
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  5. Didde Boisen Andersen & Søren Flinch Midtgaard (forthcoming). Stay Out of the Sunbed! Paternalistic Reasons for Restricting the Use of Sunbeds. Public Health Ethics:phw038.
    The use of tanning beds has been identified as being among the most significant causes of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. Accordingly, the activity is properly seen as one that involves profound harm to self. The article examines paternalistic reasons for restricting sunbed usage. We argue that both so-called soft and hard paternalistic arguments support prohibiting the use of sunbeds. We make the following three arguments: an argument from oppressive patterns of socialization suggesting that the autonomous nature of the conduct (...)
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  6.  4
    Rebecca C. H. Brown, Wendy A. Rogers, Vikki A. Entwistle & Siladitya Bhattacharya (forthcoming). Reframing the Debate Around State Responses to Infertility: Considering the Harms of Subfertility and Involuntary Childlessness. Public Health Ethics:phw005.
    Many countries are experiencing increasing levels of demand for access to assisted reproductive technologies. Policies regarding who can access ART and with what support from a collective purse are highly contested, raising questions about what state responses are justified. Whilst much of this debate has focused on the status of infertility as a disease, we argue that this is something of a distraction, since disease framing does not provide the far-reaching, robust justification for state support that proponents of ART seem (...)
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  7.  5
    Stephanie Solomon Cargill (forthcoming). Biobanking and the Abandonment of Informed Consent: An Ethical Imperative. Public Health Ethics:phw001.
    There has been extensive discussion in research ethics literature surrounding the appropriate form of informed consent for biobanking, whether with adapted content, or adapted forms such as broad or tiered consent. These discussions presuppose that it is possible to disclose adequate information at the outset to facilitate an informed choice to donate to a biobank. I will argue that informed consent cannot be achieved because in the biobanking context, we are either consenting to an enterprise that is not research or (...)
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  8.  11
    Norman Daniels (forthcoming). Equity and Population Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  9.  21
    Angus Dawson (forthcoming). Vaccination Ethics. Public Health Ethics.
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  10.  2
    Chris Degeling, Zohar Lederman & Melanie Rock (forthcoming). Culling and the Common Good: Re-Evaluating Harms and Benefits Under the One Health Paradigm. Public Health Ethics:phw019.
    One Health is a novel paradigm that recognizes that human and non-human animal health is interlinked through our shared environment. Increasingly prominent in public health responses to zoonoses, OH differs from traditional approaches to animal-borne infectious risks, because it also aims to promote the health of animals and ecological systems. Despite the widespread adoption of OH, culling remains a key component of institutional responses to the risks of zoonoses. Using the threats posed by highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses to human (...)
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  11.  2
    Adrian Guta, Stuart J. Murray, Carol Strike, Sarah Flicker, Ross Upshur & Ted Myers (forthcoming). Governing Well in Community-Based Research: Lessons From Canada’s HIV Research Sector on Ethics, Publics and the Care of the Self. Public Health Ethics:phw024.
    In this paper, we extend Michel Foucault’s final works on the ‘care of the self’ to an empirical examination of research practice in community-based research. We use Foucault’s ‘morality of behaviors’ to analyze interview data from a national sample of Canadian CBR practitioners working with communities affected by HIV. Despite claims in the literature that ethics review is overly burdensome for non-traditional forms of research, our findings suggest that many researchers using CBR have an ambivalent but ultimately productive relationship with (...)
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  12.  4
    Michael G. Head, Stephen L. Walker, Ananth Nalabanda, Jennifer Bostock & Jackie A. Cassell (forthcoming). Researching Scabies Outbreaks Among People in Residential Care and Lacking Capacity to Consent: A Case Study. Public Health Ethics:phv011.
    Infectious disease outbreaks in residential care are complex to manage and difficult to control. Research in this setting that includes individuals who lack capacity must conform to national legislation. We report here on our study that is investigating outbreaks of scabies, an itchy skin infection, in the residential care setting in the southeast of England. There appears to be a gap in legislative advice regarding the inclusion of people who lack capacity in research that takes place during time-limited acute scenarios (...)
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  13. Ann M. Heesters, Daniel Z. Buchman, Kyle W. Anstey, Jennifer A. H. Bell, Barbara J. Russell & Linda Wright (forthcoming). Power of Attorney for Research: The Need for a Clear Legal Mechanism. Public Health Ethics:phw035.
    A recent article in this journal described practical and conceptual difficulties faced by public health researchers studying scabies outbreaks in British residential care facilities. Their study population was elderly, decisionally incapacitated residents, many of whom lacked a legally appropriate decision-maker for healthcare decisions. The researchers reported difficulties securing Research Ethics Committee approval. As practicing healthcare ethicists working in a large Canadian research hospital, we are familiar with this challenge and welcomed the authors’ invitation to join the discussion of the ‘outstanding (...)
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  14.  9
    Anthony Kessel & Carolyn Stephens (forthcoming). Environment, Ethics and Public Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  15.  4
    Rod Knight, Will Small & Jean Shoveller (forthcoming). How Do ‘Public’ Values Influence Individual Health Behaviour? An Empirical-Normative Analysis of Young Men’s Discourse Regarding HIV Testing Practices. Public Health Ethics:phv031.
    Philosophical arguments stemming from the public health ethics arena suggest that public health interventions ought to be subject to normative inquiry that considers relational values, including concepts such as solidarity, reciprocity and health equity. As yet, however, the extent to which ‘public’ values influence the ‘autonomous’ decisions of the public remains largely unexplored. Drawing on interviews with 50 men in Vancouver, Canada, this study employs a critical discourse analysis to examine participants’ decisions and motivations to voluntarily access HIV testing and/or (...)
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  16.  5
    Claire Lougarre (forthcoming). Clarifying the Right to Health Through Supranational Monitoring: The Highest Standard of Health Attainable. Public Health Ethics:phv037.
    As recognized by Gostin in Global Health Law, the principles of equality and dignity put human rights law in a unique position to promote progress towards global health equity. This seems particularly relevant for the right to health, which entitles everyone to ‘the highest standard of health attainable’. However, it is still unclear what such a standard entails, and in order for the right to health to be adequately enforced and, thus, to effectively channel progress towards global health equity, it (...)
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  17.  17
    John McMillan (forthcoming). Public Health Research Ethics. Public Health Ethics.
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  18.  1
    Michael Millar & Desmond T. S. Hsu (forthcoming). Can Healthcare Workers Reasonably Question the Duty to Care Whilst Healthcare Institutions Take a Reactive Approach to Infectious Disease Risks? Public Health Ethics:phw037.
    Healthcare workers carry a substantial risk of harm from infectious disease, particularly, but not exclusively, during outbreaks. More can be done by healthcare institutions to identify risks, quantify the current burden of preventable infectious disease amongst HCWs and identify opportunities for prevention. We suggest that institutional obligations should be clarified with respect to the mitigation of infectious disease risks to staff, and question the duty of HCWs to care while healthcare institutions persist with a reactive rather than proactive attitude to (...)
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  19.  1
    Rima T. Nakkash, Sanaa Mugharbil, Hala Alaouié & Rima A. Afifi (forthcoming). Attitudes of Public Health Academics Toward Receiving Funds From for-Profit Corporations: A Systematic Review. Public Health Ethics:phw036.
    With dwindling support from governments toward universities, university–industry partnerships have increased. Ethical concerns over such partnerships have been documented, are particularly relevant when an institution receives money from a corporation whose products do harm and are intensified for academic public health institutions whose missions include promoting well-being. Academics in medicine and nutrition have often failed to recognize the potential conflicts of industry-sponsored research. It is unclear if research to date has explored attitudes of public health academics toward accepting such funds. (...)
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  20.  4
    Erik Nord (forthcoming). Public Values for Health States Versus Societal Valuations of Health Improvements: A Critique of Dan Hausman’s ‘Valuing Health’. Public Health Ethics:phw008.
    Daniel Hausman’s book ‘Valuing Health’ is a valuable contribution to our understanding of QALYs and DALYs and to moving health economics to adopting a broader perspective than that taken in conventional cost-effectiveness analysis. Hausman’s attempt at constructing a public value table for health states without having recourse to data from population preferences studies is also a fascinating read. But I have serious concerns about his resulting table. Hausman’s views on which dimensions of health a benevolent liberal state should care about (...)
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  21.  4
    Anke J. M. Oerlemans, Leo A. J. Kluijtmans & Simone van der Burg (forthcoming). The Moral Life of Professionals in Newborn Screening in the Netherlands: A Qualitative Study. Public Health Ethics:phw011.
    Newborn screening involves a complex logistical process, which depends on the close cooperation of many professionals, such as midwives, laboratory technicians, general practitioners and pediatricians. These professionals may encounter moral problems in the process, which have not been systematically studied before. This study fills this gap. We conducted interviews with 36 professionals involved in NBS in the Netherlands and made an inventory of the moral problems they encounter, as well as of the ways in which they tend to respond to (...)
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  22.  6
    Adam Oliver (forthcoming). Distinguishing Between Experienced Utility and Remembered Utility. Public Health Ethics:phw014.
    In his 2015 book, Valuing Health, the philosopher, Daniel Hausman, in referring to experienced utility maximization, touches on the question of whether people accept, and ought to accept, the assumption of health maximization vis-à-vis their own lives. This essay introduces Hausman’s arguments on experienced utility, before outlining the intellectual catalyst for the renewed interest in the maximization of experienced utility as an appropriate ethical rule; namely, the literature that arose in the 1990s that demonstrated that due to the so-called gestalt (...)
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  23.  3
    Lisa M. Parker & Stacy M. Carter (forthcoming). The Role of Socially Embedded Concepts in Breast Cancer Screening: An Empirical Study with Australian Experts. Public Health Ethics:phw012.
    It is not clear whether breast cancer screening is a public health intervention or an individual clinical service. The question is important because the concepts best suited for ethical reasoning in public health might be different to the concepts commonly employed in biomedical ethics. We consider it likely that breast screening has elements of a public health intervention and used an empirical ethics approach to explore this further. If breast screening has public health characteristics, it is probable that policy and (...)
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  24.  3
    Almudena del Pino & Miguel Ángel Royo-Bordonada (forthcoming). Ethical Evaluation of a Proposed Statutory Regulation of Food Advertising Targeted at Minors in Spain. Public Health Ethics:phw029.
    Food advertising targeted at children is associated with the development of unhealthy eating habits and childhood obesity. In Spain, where one in every three children suffers from overweight, a voluntary regulation mechanism has been adopted to control such advertising, despite evidence of its ineffectiveness. This study's stated objective was to evaluate the grounds for implementing a policy that would ban the advertising of energy-dense, nutrient-poor food and beverages targeted at children in Spain, incorporating an ethical perspective in the analysis. Using (...)
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  25.  4
    Klaus Puschel, Enrico Furlan & Wim Dekkers (forthcoming). Social Health Disparities in Clinical Care: A New Approach to Medical Fairness. Public Health Ethics:phv034.
    Social health disparities are increasing in most countries around the world. During the past two decades, a large amount of evidence has emerged about the health consequences of social inequalities. Despite such evidence, the concept of medical fairness, as traditionally defined by the World Medical Association, has remained unchallenged and even reinforced by some scholars who emphasize that doctors should remain neutral to the socioeconomic status of their patients when providing clinical care. The inconsistency between public health and clinical care (...)
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  26.  8
    Nicole M. V. Ross & Douglas P. MacKay (forthcoming). Ending SNAP-Subsidized Purchases of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages: The Need for a Pilot Project. Public Health Ethics:phw017.
    Recent efforts by legislative officials and public health advocates to reform the US food stamp program, or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, have focused on restricting the types of foods eligible for purchase with SNAP benefits, specifically sugar-sweetened beverages. We argue that it is, in principle, permissible for the US government to enact a SNAP-specific SSB ban prohibiting the purchase of SSBs with SNAP benefits. While the government has a duty to ensure that citizens meet their nutritional needs, since SSBs provide (...)
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  27.  2
    Camilla Scanlan (forthcoming). Is Anticipated Consent an Acceptable Model for a Unique Cohort of Research Participants? Commentary on Case Study of Scabies in Nursing Homes. Public Health Ethics:phw022.
    Scabies is a global problem and is of such concern that in 2013 it was added to the World Health Organization list of neglected tropical diseases.1 Due to its highly contagious nature, it is easily spread where humans are in close living environments, and is therefore of particular concern in nursing homes where it may affect both residents and staff. Hence, prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment of cases are important to control the spread; however, this is hindered by current difficulties (...)
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  28.  2
    Jeremy Snyder & Valorie A. Crooks (forthcoming). Can We Care for Aging Persons Without Worsening Global Inequities? The Case of Long-Term Care Worker Migration From the Anglophone Caribbean. Public Health Ethics:phw031.
    The international migration of health workers, including long-term care workers for aging populations, contributes to a shortage of these workers in many parts of the world. In the Anglophone Caribbean, LCW shortages and the migration of nurses to take on LCW positions abroad threaten the health of local populations and widen global inequities in health. Many responses have been proposed to address the international migration of health workers generally, including making it more difficult for these workers to emigrate and increasing (...)
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  29.  3
    Yrrah H. Stol, Eva C. A. Asscher & Maartje H. N. Schermer (forthcoming). Reasons to Participate or Not to Participate in Cardiovascular Health Checks: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW] Public Health Ethics:phv030.
    Cardiovascular health checks test risk factors for cardiovascular disease. They are offered to improve health: in case of an increased risk, participants receive lifestyle advice and medication. With this review, we investigate what is known about the reasons why people do or do not test for CVD risk factors. To what extent do these reasons relate to health monitoring and/or improvement? And do reasons differ in different contexts in which health checks are offered? We conducted a literature search and included (...)
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  30.  1
    Yrrah H. Stol, Maartje H. N. Schermer & Eva C. A. Asscher (forthcoming). Omnipresent Health Checks May Result in Over-Responsibilization. Public Health Ethics:phw034.
    Health checks identify disease in individuals without a medical indication. More and more checks are offered by more providers on more risk factors and diseases, so we may speak of an omnipresence of health checks. Current ethical evaluation of health checks considers checks on an individual basis only. However, omnipresent checks have effects over and above the effects of individual health checks. They might give the impression that health is entirely manageable by individual actions and strengthen the norm of individual (...)
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  31.  4
    Elisabeth Marie Strømme & Ole Frithjof Norheim (forthcoming). Global Health Inequality: Comparing Inequality-Adjusted Life Expectancy Over Time. Public Health Ethics:phw033.
    Background and objectives: Summary measures of overall health inequality are independent of group membership and enable international comparisons of distribution of health. We compare inequality between and within countries over time and identify normative issues underlying such comparisons. Methods: We used a set of modeled historical life tables for 193 World Health Organization member states from the years 1990, 2000 and 2008 and calculated inequality in age at death and inequality-adjusted life expectancy. Results: Our calculations suggest that overall health inequalities (...)
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  32.  3
    Keith Syrett (forthcoming). Doing ‘Upstream’ Priority-Setting for Global Health with Justice: Moving From Vision to Practice? Public Health Ethics:phw026.
    The vision of global health with justice which Larry Gostin articulates in his book Global Health Law envisages a switch to ‘upstream’ priority-setting for expenditure on health, with a focus upon social determinants and a goal of redressing health inequalities. This article explores what is meant by this proposal and offers a critical evaluation of it. It is argued that difficulties arise in respect of the ethical and evidential bases for such an approach to the setting of priorities, while significant (...)
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  33.  17
    Marcel Verweij & A. Dawson (forthcoming). Infectious Disease Control. Public Health Ethics.
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  34.  4
    Peter G. N. West-Oram & Alena Buyx (forthcoming). Global Health Solidarity. Public Health Ethics:phw021.
    For much of the 20th century, vulnerability to deprivations of health has often been defined by geographical and economic factors. Those in wealthy, usually ‘Northern’ and ‘Western’, parts of the world have benefited from infrastructures, and accidents of geography and climate, which insulate them from many serious threats to health. Conversely, poorer people are typically exposed to more threats to health, and have lesser access to the infrastructures needed to safeguard them against the worst consequences of such exposure. However, in (...)
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  35.  19
    Stephen Wilkinson (forthcoming). Selective Reproduction, Eugenics, and Public Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  36.  3
    Jane Williams, Stacy Carter & Lucie Rychetnik (forthcoming). Contested Guideline Development in Australia’s Cervical Screening Program: Values Drive Different Views of the Purpose and Implementation of Organized Screening. Public Health Ethics:phw030.
    This article draws on an empirical investigation of how Australia’s cervical screening program came to be the way it is. The study was carried out using grounded theory methodology and primarily uses interviews with experts involved in establishing, updating or administering the program. We found strong differences in experts’ normative evaluations of the program and beliefs about optimal ways of achieving the same basic outcome: a reduction in morbidity and mortality caused by invasive cervical cancer. Our analysis demonstrates how variations (...)
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  37.  4
    James Wilson (forthcoming). Public Value, Maximization and Health Policy: An Examination of Hausman’s Restricted Consequentialism. Public Health Ethics:phw020.
    In the book Valuing Health, Daniel Hausman sets out a normative framework for assessing social policy, which he calls restricted consequentialism. For the restricted consequentialist, government policy-making not only is, but ought to be, largely siloed in individual government departments. Each department has its own goal linked to a fundamental public value, which it should pursue in a maximizing way. I argue that, first, Hausman’s argument appears to be internally inconsistent: his case for thinking that health policy should default to (...)
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