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Forthcoming articles
  1. Christian Munthe & Susanna Radovic (forthcoming). The Return of Lombroso? Ethical Aspects of Preventive Forensic Screening. Public Health Ethics:phu048.
    The vision of legendary criminologist Cesare Lombroso to use scientific theories of individual causes of crime as a basis for screening and prevention programmes targeting individuals at risk for future criminal behaviour has resurfaced, following advances in genetics, neuroscience and psychiatric epidemiology. This article analyses this idea and maps its ethical implications from a public health ethical standpoint. Twenty-seven variants of the new Lombrosian vision of forensic screening and prevention are distinguished, and some scientific and technical limitations are noted. Some (...)
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  2. A. Albertsen (forthcoming). Luck Egalitarianism, Social Determinants and Public Health Initiatives. Public Health Ethics:phu022.
    People’s health is hugely affected by where they live, their occupational status and their socio-economic position. It has been widely argued that the presence of such social determinants in health provides good reasons to reject luck egalitarianism as a theory of distributive justice in health. The literature provides different reasons why this responsibility-sensitive theory of distributive justice should not be applied to health. The critiques submit that (i) the social circumstances undermine or remove people’s responsibility for their health; (ii) responsibility (...)
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  3. D. Chalmers, M. Burgess, K. Edwards, J. Kaye, E. M. Meslin & D. Nicol (forthcoming). Marking Shifts in Human Research Ethics in the Development of Biobanking. Public Health Ethics:phu023.
    Biobanks are increasingly being created specifically for research purposes. Concomitantly, we are seeing significant and evolving shifts in research ethics in relation to biobanking. Three discrete shifts are identified in this article. The first extends the ethical focus beyond the protection of human subjects to the promotion of broader community benefits of research utilizing biobanked resources, and an expectation that these benefits will be shared. The second involves the evolution of the traditional consent paradigm for future research uses of biobanks (...)
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  4. S. Huster & T. Schramme (forthcoming). Expanding the Normative Framework of Public Health Ethics: Some Results From an Interdisciplinary Research Group. Public Health Ethics:phu043.
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  5. A. Wardrope (forthcoming). Relational Autonomy and the Ethics of Health Promotion. Public Health Ethics:phu025.
    Recent articles published in this journal have highlighted the shortcomings of individualistic approaches to health promotion, and the potential contributions of relational analyses of autonomy to public health ethics. I argue that the latter helps to elucidate the former, by showing that an inadequate analysis of autonomy leads to misassignment of both forward-looking and backward-looking responsibility for health outcomes. Health promotion programmes predicated on such inadequate analyses are then ineffective, because they assign responsibility to agents whose social environment inhibits their (...)
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  6. Gillian Brock (forthcoming). Global Justice, Cosmopolitan Duties and Duties to Compatriots: The Case of Healthcare. Public Health Ethics:phu039.
    How are we to navigate between duties to compatriots and duties to non-compatriots? Within the literature there are two important kinds of accounts that are thought to offer contrasting positions on these issues, namely, cosmopolitanism and statism. We discuss these two rival accounts. I then outline my position on global justice and how to accommodate insights from both the cosmopolitan and statist traditions within it. Having outlined my ideal theory account of what global justice requires, I discuss the far more (...)
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  7. Stacy M. Carter (forthcoming). The Ethics of Menu Labelling. Public Health Ethics:phu044.
    In this commentary, I explore the ethically relevant dimensions of menu labelling. The evidence that menu labelling changes purchasing or consumption behaviour is contentious and inconclusive; there is some suggestion that menu labelling may preferentially influence the behaviour of healthier and wealthier citizens. Some suggest that menu labelling is unjust, as it fails to direct resources towards those who most need them. An alternative is to see menu labels as just one of a set of strategies that can increase people’s (...)
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  8. Norman Daniels (forthcoming). Equity and Population Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  9. Angus Dawson (forthcoming). Vaccination Ethics. Public Health Ethics.
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  10. Angus Dawson & Marcel Verweij (forthcoming). Public Health: Beyond the Role of the State. Public Health Ethics:phv002.
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  11. Moti Gorin & Harald Schmidt (forthcoming). I Did It For the Money’: Incentives, Rationalizations and Health. Public Health Ethics:phu034.
    Incentive programs have been criticized due to concerns that extrinsic rewards can ‘crowd out’ intrinsic motivation, and also that such programs might exert a corrupting influence on those receiving the incentive. Jonathan Wolff has argued that while these worries are in some instances well grounded, incentives can also operate by liberating people from social pressures that stand in the way of their intrinsic motivations. We further develop Wolff's insight by articulating a framework for assessing such incentives and discussing several areas (...)
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  12. Bruce Jennings (forthcoming). Relational Liberty Revisited: Membership, Solidarity and a Public Health Ethics of Place. Public Health Ethics:phu045.
    Public health involves the use of power to change institutions and redistribute resources and deliberately to shape individual thought and behavior. This requires normative legitimation and demands ethical critique. This article explores concepts that are vital to public health ethics, but have been relatively neglected. These are membership, solidarity and the concept of place. The article argues that the practice of public health should recognize the equal rights of membership in communities of health justice. Public health should also rely on (...)
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  13. Anthony Kessel & Carolyn Stephens (forthcoming). Environment, Ethics and Public Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  14. Mathias Kifmann (forthcoming). Comment on ‘Paying People to Act in Their Own Interests: Incentives Versus Rationalisation in Public Health’ by Jonathan Wolff. Public Health Ethics:phu038.
    This article comments on Jonathan Wolff’s contribution ‘Paying People to Act in Their Own Interests: Incentives versus Rationalisation in Public Health’ from an economics perspective. The role of incentives in public health is discussed from both a neoclassical and behavioural economics viewpoint. Jonathan Wolff contributes to this discussion by outlining a new mechanism. He demonstrates that incentives may matter in a different way than has been considered so far. In particular, Wolff shows that we should not view individuals in isolation (...)
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  15. Ana Komparic, Maxwell J. Smith & Alison Thompson (forthcoming). An Ethical Justification for Expanding the Notion of Effectiveness in Vaccine Post-Market Monitoring: Insights From the HPV Vaccine in Canada. Public Health Ethics:phu049.
    Health regulators must carefully monitor the real-world safety and effectiveness of marketed vaccines through post-market monitoring in order to protect the public’s health and promote those vaccines that best achieve public health goals. Yet, despite the fact that vaccines used in collective immunization programmes should be assessed in the context of a public health response, post-market effectiveness monitoring is often limited to assessing immunogenicity or limited programmatic features, rather than assessing effectiveness across populations. We argue that post-market monitoring ought to (...)
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  16. Kathryn L. MacKay (forthcoming). The Restaurant Food Hot Potato: Stop Passing It on—A Commentary on Mah and Timming’s, ‘Equity in Public Health Ethics: The Case of Menu Labelling Policy at the Local Level. Public Health Ethics:phu046.
    In the case discussion, ‘Equity in Public Health Ethics: The Case of Menu Labelling Policy at the Local Level’ , Mah and Timming state that menu labelling would ‘place requirements for information disclosure on private sector food businesses, which, as a policy instrument, is arguably less intrusive than related activities such as requiring changes to the food content’. In this commentary on Mah and Timming’s case study, I focus on discussing how menu-labelling policy permits governments to avoid addressing the heart (...)
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  17. Catherine L. Mah & Carol Timmings (forthcoming). Equity in Public Health Ethics: The Case of Menu Labelling Policy at the Local Level. Public Health Ethics:phu011.
    Menu labelling is a public health policy intervention that applies principles of nutrition labelling to the eating out environment. While menu labelling has received a good deal of attention with regard to its effectiveness in shaping food choices for obesity prevention, its premises have not yet been fully explored in terms of its broader applications to social equity and population health. In the following case, we focus on the example of menu labelling within the context of food policy at the (...)
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  18. John McMillan (forthcoming). Public Health Research Ethics. Public Health Ethics.
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  19. Leticia Morales (forthcoming). Taking Facts Seriously: Judicial Intervention in Public Health Controversies. Public Health Ethics:phu041.
    Courts play a key role in deciding on public health controversies, but the legitimacy of judicial intervention remains highly controversial. In this article I suggest that we need to carefully distinguish between different reasons for persistent disagreement in the domain of public health. Adjudicating between public health controversies rooted in factual disagreements allows us to investigate more closely the epistemic capacities of the judicial process. While the critics typically point out the lack of appropriate expertise of judges—in particular with respect (...)
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  20. Anders Nordgren (forthcoming). Crisis Management and Public Health: Ethical Principles for Priority Setting at a Regional Level in Sweden. Public Health Ethics:phu028.
    In this article I analyse and discuss guidelines for priority setting in crisis management at a regional level in Sweden. The guidelines concern three types of crises: pandemics, large losses of electric power and interruptions in water supply. Pandemics are typical public health issues. Large losses of electric power and interruptions in water supply are in themselves not, but may have serious public health consequences. These guidelines are compared with guidelines for priority setting in health care. This is done because (...)
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  21. Volker H. Schmidt (forthcoming). Public Health Ethics. Problems and Suggestions. Public Health Ethics:phu040.
    The article concerns itself with normative aspects of public health in light of recent debates. It starts out by introducing a few terminological and conceptual distinctions that set the stage for the subsequent discussion. This is followed by critical remarks on two proposals for developing an adequate public health ethics and the way that the growing health inequalities observed in much of the OECD-world are dealt with in parts of the pertinent literature. The article concludes with a cautionary note on (...)
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  22. Maxwell J. Smith (forthcoming). Health Equity in Public Health: Clarifying Our Commitment. Public Health Ethics:phu042.
    Health equity is increasingly identified as a principal goal to be achieved through public health policies and activities. However, what is to be measured in the assessment of health equity and how inequities in health ought to be redressed are among the pressing questions that must be answered if health equity is to serve as a meaningful and consistent ethical guide for measurement and intervention in public health. In this article I argue that the concept of health equity, in the (...)
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  23. Maxwell J. Smith (forthcoming). What’s on the Menu for an Equitable Approach to Nutrition Labelling in Restaurants? Public Health Ethics:phu047.
    The primary aim of menu labelling should be understood as informing consumers such that they are better able to make informed food purchasing and consumption decisions; the extent to which consumers’ behaviours or, indeed, health outcomes, are affected may be contingent on several other factors and should therefore be considered more distal aims of what menu labelling intends to, or is able to, achieve. It is of importance to be clear about the nature and scope of menu labelling, including what (...)
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  24. Marcel Verweij & A. Dawson (forthcoming). Infectious Disease Control. Public Health Ethics.
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  25. Stephen Wilkinson (forthcoming). Selective Reproduction, Eugenics, and Public Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  26. Jonathan Wolff (forthcoming). Paying People to Act in Their Own Interests: Incentives Versus Rationalization in Public Health. Public Health Ethics:phu035.
    A number of schemes have been attempted, both in public health and more generally within social programmes, to pay individuals to behave in ways that are presumed to be good for them or to have other beneficial effects. Such schemes are normally regarded as providing a financial incentive for individuals in order to outweigh contrary motivation. Such schemes have been attacked on the basis that they can ‘crowd out’ intrinsic motivation, as well as on the grounds that they are in (...)
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  27. Catherine A. Womack (forthcoming). Looking Beyond Labeling: From Calories to Construction of New Menus and Venues for Healthier Eating. Public Health Ethics:phv001.
    Calorie labeling on menus is one of the more recent public health responses to calls for increased access to nutrition information. The goal is to encourage consumers to make more healthy food choices. In this commentary on ‘Equity in Public Health Ethics: The Case of Menu Labelling Policy at the Local Level’, I focus first on research supporting health equity-directed goals for menu labeling policies; then I turn to the issue of challenges and opportunities for menu labeling as a part (...)
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