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Forthcoming articles
  1. A. Albertsen (forthcoming). Luck Egalitarianism, Social Determinants and Public Health Initiatives. Public Health Ethics:phu022.
    People’s health is hugely affected by where they live, their occupational status and their socio-economic position. It has been widely argued that the presence of such social determinants in health provides good reasons to reject luck egalitarianism as a theory of distributive justice in health. The literature provides different reasons why this responsibility-sensitive theory of distributive justice should not be applied to health. The critiques submit that (i) the social circumstances undermine or remove people’s responsibility for their health; (ii) responsibility (...)
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  2. D. Chalmers, M. Burgess, K. Edwards, J. Kaye, E. M. Meslin & D. Nicol (forthcoming). Marking Shifts in Human Research Ethics in the Development of Biobanking. Public Health Ethics:phu023.
    Biobanks are increasingly being created specifically for research purposes. Concomitantly, we are seeing significant and evolving shifts in research ethics in relation to biobanking. Three discrete shifts are identified in this article. The first extends the ethical focus beyond the protection of human subjects to the promotion of broader community benefits of research utilizing biobanked resources, and an expectation that these benefits will be shared. The second involves the evolution of the traditional consent paradigm for future research uses of biobanks (...)
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  3. A. Wardrope (forthcoming). Relational Autonomy and the Ethics of Health Promotion. Public Health Ethics:phu025.
    Recent articles published in this journal have highlighted the shortcomings of individualistic approaches to health promotion, and the potential contributions of relational analyses of autonomy to public health ethics. I argue that the latter helps to elucidate the former, by showing that an inadequate analysis of autonomy leads to misassignment of both forward-looking and backward-looking responsibility for health outcomes. Health promotion programmes predicated on such inadequate analyses are then ineffective, because they assign responsibility to agents whose social environment inhibits their (...)
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  4. Norman Daniels (forthcoming). Equity and Population Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  5. Angus Dawson (forthcoming). Vaccination Ethics. Public Health Ethics.
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  6. Moti Gorin & Harald Schmidt (forthcoming). 'I Did It For the Money': Incentives, Rationalizations and Health. Public Health Ethics:phu034.
    Incentive programs have been criticized due to concerns that extrinsic rewards can ‘crowd out’ intrinsic motivation, and also that such programs might exert a corrupting influence on those receiving the incentive. Jonathan Wolff has argued that while these worries are in some instances well grounded, incentives can also operate by liberating people from social pressures that stand in the way of their intrinsic motivations. We further develop Wolff's insight by articulating a framework for assessing such incentives and discussing several areas (...)
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  7. Anthony Kessel & Carolyn Stephens (forthcoming). Environment, Ethics and Public Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  8. Mathias Kifmann (forthcoming). Comment on 'Paying People to Act in Their Own Interests: Incentives Versus Rationalisation in Public Health' by Jonathan Wolff. Public Health Ethics:phu038.
    This article comments on Jonathan Wolff’s contribution ‘Paying People to Act in Their Own Interests: Incentives versus Rationalisation in Public Health’ from an economics perspective. The role of incentives in public health is discussed from both a neoclassical and behavioural economics viewpoint. Jonathan Wolff contributes to this discussion by outlining a new mechanism. He demonstrates that incentives may matter in a different way than has been considered so far. In particular, Wolff shows that we should not view individuals in isolation (...)
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  9. Catherine L. Mah & Carol Timmings (forthcoming). Equity in Public Health Ethics: The Case of Menu Labelling Policy at the Local Level. Public Health Ethics:phu011.
    Menu labelling is a public health policy intervention that applies principles of nutrition labelling to the eating out environment. While menu labelling has received a good deal of attention with regard to its effectiveness in shaping food choices for obesity prevention, its premises have not yet been fully explored in terms of its broader applications to social equity and population health. In the following case, we focus on the example of menu labelling within the context of food policy at the (...)
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  10. John McMillan (forthcoming). Public Health Research Ethics. Public Health Ethics.
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  11. Anders Nordgren (forthcoming). Crisis Management and Public Health: Ethical Principles for Priority Setting at a Regional Level in Sweden. Public Health Ethics:phu028.
    In this article I analyse and discuss guidelines for priority setting in crisis management at a regional level in Sweden. The guidelines concern three types of crises: pandemics, large losses of electric power and interruptions in water supply. Pandemics are typical public health issues. Large losses of electric power and interruptions in water supply are in themselves not, but may have serious public health consequences. These guidelines are compared with guidelines for priority setting in health care. This is done because (...)
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  12. Marcel Verweij & A. Dawson (forthcoming). Infectious Disease Control. Public Health Ethics.
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  13. Stephen Wilkinson (forthcoming). Selective Reproduction, Eugenics, and Public Health. Public Health Ethics.
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  14. Jonathan Wolff (forthcoming). Paying People to Act in Their Own Interests: Incentives Versus Rationalization in Public Health. Public Health Ethics:phu035.
    A number of schemes have been attempted, both in public health and more generally within social programmes, to pay individuals to behave in ways that are presumed to be good for them or to have other beneficial effects. Such schemes are normally regarded as providing a financial incentive for individuals in order to outweigh contrary motivation. Such schemes have been attacked on the basis that they can ‘crowd out’ intrinsic motivation, as well as on the grounds that they are in (...)
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