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Forthcoming articles
  1.  5
    Simo Vehmas & Benjamin L. Curtis (forthcoming). Profound Intellectual Disability and the Bestowment View of Moral Status. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25.
    This article engages with debates concerning the moral worth of human beings with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMDs). Some argue that those with such disabilities are morally less valuable than so-called normal human beings, whereas others argue that all human beings have equal moral value and so each group of humans ought to be treated with equal concern. We will argue in favor of a reconciliatory view that takes points from opposing camps in the debates about the moral worth (...)
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  2.  7
    Inmaculada de Melo-Martin (forthcoming). When the Milk of Human Kindness Becomes a Luxury (and Untested) Good. A Reply to Harris’ Unconditional Embrace of Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
    A new reprogenetic technology, mitochondrial replacement, is making its appearance and, unsurprisingly given its promise to wash off our earthly stains --or at least the scourges of sexual reproduction--, John Harris finds only reasons to celebrate this new scientific feat.1 In fact, he finds mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs) so “unreservedly welcome” that he believes those who reject them suffer from “a large degree of desperation and not a little callousness.”2 Believing myself to be neither desperate nor callous, but finding myself (...)
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  3. Sven Nyholm & Elizabeth O'Neill (forthcoming). Deep Brain Stimulation, Continuity Over Time, and the True Self. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
    One of the topics that often comes up in ethical discussions of deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the question of what impact DBS has, or might have, on the patient’s self. This is often understood as a question of whether DBS poses a “threat” to personal identity, which is typically understood as having to do with psychological and/or narrative continuity over time. In this article, we argue that the discussion of whether DBS is a “threat” to continuity over time is (...)
     
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  4. G. J. Agich (forthcoming). Why Quality is so Rarely Addressed in Clinical Ethics Consultation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
     
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  5.  1
    Marysa Demoor (forthcoming). Not with a Bang but a Whimper: The Great Victorians' Exit From a Modernist World, as Reflected in Lucy Clifford's Correspondence, 1919-1929. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
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  6. A. Klotzko (forthcoming). Cloning Issue. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
     
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  7. L. J. M. Stark (forthcoming). Reading Trust Between the Lines: An Ethnography of 'Housekeeping Work'on Human-Subjects Review Boards. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
     
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