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Forthcoming articles
  1.  31
    Øystein Linnebo (forthcoming). Plurals and Modals. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-23.
    Consider one of several things. Is the one thing necessarily one of the several? This key question in the modal logic of plurals is clarified. Some defenses of an affirmative answer are developed and compared. Various remarks are made about the broader philosophical significance of the question.
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  2.  9
    Eric Vogelstein (forthcoming). A New Moral Sentimentalism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-23.
    This paper argues for a novel sentimentalist realist metaethical theory, according to which moral wrongness is analyzed in terms of the sentiments one has most reason to have. As opposed to standard sentimentalist views, the theory does not employ sentiments that are had in response to morally wrong action, but rather sentiments that antecedently dispose people to refrain from immoral behavior, specifically the sentiments of compassion and respect.
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  3.  64
    Peter Fritz (forthcoming). First-Order Modal Logic in the Necessary Framework of Objects. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-26.
    I consider the first-order modal logic which counts as valid those sentences which are true on every interpretation of the non-logical constants. Based on the assumptions that it is necessary what individuals there are and that it is necessary which propositions are necessary, Timothy Williamson has tentatively suggested an argument for the claim that this logic is determined by a possible world structure consisting of an infinite set of individuals and an infinite set of worlds. He notes that only the (...)
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  4. James Bohman (forthcoming). Constituting Humanity: Universal Political Rights and the Human Community. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
     
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  5. Steve Clarke (forthcoming). The Reversal Test, Status Quo Bias, and Opposition to Human Cognitive Enhancement. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    Bostrom and Ord’s reversal test has been appealed to by many philosophers to substantiate the charge that preferences for status quo options are motivated by status quo bias. I argue that their characterization of the reversal test needs to be modified, and that their description of the burden of proof it imposes needs to be clarified. I then argue that there is a way to meet that burden of proof which Bostrom and Ord fail to recognize. I also argue that (...)
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  6.  8
    Kit Fine (forthcoming). Williamson on Fine on Prior on the Reduction of Possibilist Discourse. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-23.
    I attempt to meet some criticisms that Williamson makes of my attempt to carry out Prior's project of reducing possibility discourse to actualist discourse.
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  7.  22
    Axel Gosseries (forthcoming). Cosmopolitan Luck Egalitarianism and Climate Change. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
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  8.  10
    Aaron James (forthcoming). . Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-19.
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  9.  12
    Victor Kumar (forthcoming). Psychopathy and Internalism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-28.
    Do psychopaths make moral judgments but lack motivation? Or are psychopaths’ judgments are not genuinely moral? Both sides of this debate seem to assume either externalist or internalist criteria for the presence of moral judgment. However, if moral judgment is a natural kind, we can arrive at a theory-neutral criterion for moral judgment. A leading naturalistic criterion suggests that psychopaths have an impaired capacity for moral judgment; the capacity is neither fully present nor fully absent. Psychopaths are therefore not counterexamples (...)
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  10.  12
    Don Ross (forthcoming). Critical Notice of Ron McClamrock "Existential Cognition". Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    McClamrock argues for a thesis he calls radical externalism' in the behavioral and cognitive sciences. In my paper, I contend that McClamrock's thesis, though true, is not radical. This is because he urges externalism with respect to cognitive task-individuation and task-explanation, both of which are standard practice in the relevant disciplines. Semantic externalism may remain contentious, I argue; but the sense in which philosophers continue to argue about it has little bearing on the actual conduct of cognitive science. I conclude (...)
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  11.  7
    Theodore Sider (forthcoming). On Williamson and Simplicity in Modal Logic. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    According to Timothy Williamson, we should accept the simplest and most powerful second-order modal logic, and as a result accept an ontology of "bare possibilia". This general method for extracting ontology from logic is salutary, but its application in this case depends on a questionable assumption: that modality is a fundamental feature of the world.
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  12.  5
    Robert Stalnaker (forthcoming). Models and Reality. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    Kripke models, interpreted realistically, have difficulty making sense of the thesis that there might have existed things that do not in fact exist, since a Kripke model in which this thesis is true requires a model structure in which there are possible worlds with domains that contain things that do not exist. This paper argues that we can use Kripke models as representational devices that allow us to give a realistic interpretation of a modal language. The method of doing this (...)
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  13.  15
    Meghan Sullivan (forthcoming). An A-Theory Without Tense Operators. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-24.
    A-theorists think there is a fundamental difference between the present and other times. This concern shows up in what kinds of properties they take to be instantiated, what objects they think exist and how they formalize their views. Nearly every contemporary A-theorist assumes that her metaphysics requires a tense logic – a logic with operators like and. In this paper, I show that there is at least one viable A-theory that does not require a logic with tense operators. And I (...)
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  14.  5
    Barbara Vetter (forthcoming). Williamsonian Modal Epistemology, Possibility-Based. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-30.
    Williamsonian modal epistemology is characterized by two commitments: realism about modality, and anti-exceptionalism about our modal knowledge. Williamson’s own counterfactual-based modal epistemology is the best known implementation of WME, but not the only option that is available. I sketch and defend an alternative implementation which takes our knowledge of metaphysical modality to arise, not from knowledge of counterfactuals, but from our knowledge of ordinary possibility statements of the form ‘x can F’. I defend this view against a criticism indicated in (...)
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  15. Robert Ware & K. Nielsen (forthcoming). Analyzing Marxism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
     
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  16.  1
    Ariel Zylberman (forthcoming). Human Rights and the Rights of States: A Relational Account. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-27.
    What is the relationship between human rights and the rights of states? Roughly, while cosmopolitans insist that international morality must regard as basic the interests of individuals, statists maintain that the state is of fundamental moral significance. This article defends a relational version of statism. Human rights are ultimately grounded in a relational norm of reciprocal independence and set limits to the exercise of public authority, but, contra the cosmopolitan, the state is of fundamental moral significance. A relational account promises (...)
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