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Forthcoming articles
  1. David Bourget (forthcoming). Representationalism, Perceptual Distortion, and the Limits of Phenomenal Concepts. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    This paper replies to objections from perceptual distortion (blur, perspective, double vision, etc.) against the representationalist thesis that the phenomenal characters of experiences supervene on their intentional contents. It has been argued that some pairs of distorted and undistorted experiences share contents without sharing phenomenal characters, which is incompatible with the supervenience thesis. In reply, I suggest that such cases are not counterexamples to the representationalist thesis because the contents of distorted experiences are always impoverished in some way compared to (...)
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  2. Daniel Smyth (forthcoming). Infinity and Givenness: Kant on the Intuitive Origin of Spatial Representation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-29.
    I advance a novel interpretation of Kant's argument that our original representation of space must be intuitive, according to which the intuitive status of spatial representation is secured by its infinitary structure. I defend a conception of intuitive representation as what must be given to the mind in order to be thought at all. Discursive representation, as modelled on the specific division of a highest genus into species, cannot account for infinite complexity. Because we represent space as infinitely complex, the (...)
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  3. Julie Tannenbaum (forthcoming). Mere Moral Failure. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    When, in spite of our good intentions, we fail to meet our obligations to others, it is important that we have the correct theoretical description of what has happened so that mutual understanding and the right sort of social repair can occur. Consider an agent who promises to help pick a friend up from the airport. She takes the freeway, forgetting that it is under construction. After a long wait, the friend takes an expensive taxi ride home. Most theorists and (...)
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  4. John J. Callanan (forthcoming). Kant on the Acquisition of Geometrical Concepts. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-25.
    It is often maintained that one insight of Kant's Critical philosophy is its recognition of the need to distinguish accounts of knowledge acquisition from knowledge justification. In particular, it is claimed that Kant held that the detailing of a concept's acquisition conditions is insufficient to determine its legitimacy. I argue that this is not the case at least with regard to geometrical concepts. Considered in the light of his pre-Critical writings on the mathematical method, construction in the Critique can be (...)
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  5. Emily Carson & Lisa Shabel (forthcoming). Introduction. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-5.
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  6. Katherine Dunlop (forthcoming). Arbitrary Combination and the Use of Signs in Mathematics: Kant's 1763 Prize Essay and its Wolffian Background. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-28.
    In his 1763 Prize Essay, Kant is thought to endorse a version of formalism on which mathematical concepts need not apply to extramental objects. Against this reading, I argue that the Prize Essay has sufficient resources to explain how the objective reference of mathematical concepts is secured. This account of mathematical concepts’ objective reference employs material from Wolffian philosophy. On my reading, Kant's 1763 view still falls short of his Critical view in that it does not explain the universal, unconditional (...)
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  7. Jeremy Heis (forthcoming). Kant on Real Definitions in Geometry. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-26.
    This paper gives a contextualized reading of Kant's theory of real definitions in geometry. Though Leibniz, Wolff, Lambert and Kant all believe that definitions in geometry must be ‘real’, they disagree about what a real definition is. These disagreements are made vivid by looking at two of Euclid's definitions. I argue that Kant accepted Euclid's definition of circle and rejected his definition of parallel lines because his conception of mathematics placed uniquely stringent requirements on real definitions in geometry. Leibniz, Wolff (...)
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  8. Thomas Land (forthcoming). Spatial Representation, Magnitude and the Two Stems of Cognition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-27.
    The aim of this paper is to show that attention to Kant's philosophy of mathematics sheds light on the doctrine that there are two stems of the cognitive capacity, which are distinct, but equally necessary for cognition. Specifically, I argue for the following four claims: The distinctive structure of outer sensible intuitions must be understood in terms of the concept of magnitude. The act of sensibly representing a magnitude involves a special act of spontaneity Kant ascribes to a capacity he (...)
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  9. James Bohman (forthcoming). Constituting Humanity: Universal Political Rights and the Human Community. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
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  10. Courtney David Fugate (forthcoming). ‘With a Philosophical Eye’: The Role of Mathematical Beauty in Kant's Intellectual Development. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-30.
    This paper shows that Kant's investigation into mathematical purposiveness was central to the development of his understanding of synthetic a priori knowledge. Specifically, it provides a clear historical explanation as to why Kant points to mathematics as an exemplary case of the synthetic a priori, argues that his early analysis of mathematical purposiveness provides a clue to the metaphysical context and motives from which his understanding of synthetic a-priori knowledge emerged, and provides an analysis of the underlying structure of mathematical (...)
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  11. Axel Gosseries (forthcoming). Cosmopolitan Luck Egalitarianism and Climate Change. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
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  12. Aaron James (forthcoming). . Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-19.
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  13. Alison Laywine (forthcoming). Kant on Conic Sections. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-40.
    This paper tries to make sense of Kant's scattered remarks about conic sections to see what light they shed on his philosophy of mathematics. It proceeds by confronting his remarks with the source that seems to have informed his thinking about conic sections: the Conica of Apollonius. The paper raises questions about Kant's attitude towards mathematics and the way he understood the cognitive resources available to us to do mathematics.
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  14. Don Ross (forthcoming). Critical Notice of Ron McClamrock "Existential Cognition". Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    McClamrock argues for a thesis he calls radical externalism' in the behavioral and cognitive sciences. In my paper, I contend that McClamrock's thesis, though true, is not radical. This is because he urges externalism with respect to cognitive task-individuation and task-explanation, both of which are standard practice in the relevant disciplines. Semantic externalism may remain contentious, I argue; but the sense in which philosophers continue to argue about it has little bearing on the actual conduct of cognitive science. I conclude (...)
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  15. Robert Ware & K. Nielsen (forthcoming). Analyzing Marxism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
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