Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Endre Begby (forthcoming). Lexical Norms, Language Comprehension, and the Epistemology of Testimony. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-19.
    Most testimonial exchange occurs by way of linguistic communication. This suggests that the epistemology of language comprehension is importantly implicated in the epistemology of testimony. But how? This paper takes its departure from a recent argument developed by Sanford Goldberg. According to Goldberg, reflection on the connections between the epistemologies of language comprehension and testimony provides a novel argument for linguistic normativity: without positing public linguistic norms we would be at a loss to account for widely assumed epistemic entitlements to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. David Bourget (forthcoming). Representationalism, Perceptual Distortion, and the Limits of Phenomenal Concepts. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    This paper replies to objections from perceptual distortion (blur, perspective, double vision, etc.) against the representationalist thesis that the phenomenal characters of experiences supervene on their intentional contents. It has been argued that some pairs of distorted and undistorted experiences share contents without sharing phenomenal characters, which is incompatible with the supervenience thesis. In reply, I suggest that such cases are not counterexamples to the representationalist thesis because the contents of distorted experiences are always impoverished in some way compared to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Sem de Maagt (forthcoming). In Defence of Fact-Dependency. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-20.
    G.A. Cohen and David Estlund claim that, because of their fact-dependent nature, constructivist theories of justice do not qualify as moral theories about fundamental values such as justice. In this paper, I defend fact-dependent, constructivist theories of justice against this fact-independency critique. I argue that constructivists can invoke facts among the grounds for accepting fundamental principles of justice while maintaining that the foundation of morality has to be non-empirical. My claim is that constructivists ultimately account for the normativity of fact-dependent (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Erin Eaker (forthcoming). Kripke's Sole Route to the Necessary a Posteriori. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-19.
    In ?Kripke on epistemic and metaphysical possibility: two routes to the necessary a posteriori?, Scott Soames identifies two arguments for the existence of necessary a posteriori truths in Naming and Necessity (NN). He argues that Kripke's second argument relies on either of two principles, each of which leads to contradiction. He also claims that it has led to ?two-dimensionalist? approaches to the necessary a posteriori which are fundamentally at odds with the insights about meaning and modality expressed in NN. I (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. E. Sonny Elizondo (forthcoming). More Than a Feeling. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    According to rationalist conceptions of moral agency, the constitutive capacities of moral agency are rational capacities. So understood, rationalists are often thought to have a problem with feeling. For example, many believe that rationalists must reject the attractive Aristotelian thought that moral activity is by nature pleasant. I disagree. It is easy to go wrong here because it is easy to assume that pleasure is empirical rather than rational and so extrinsic rather than intrinsic to moral agency, rationalistically conceived. Drawing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Robert Schroer (forthcoming). The Goldilocks Problem of the Specificity of Visual Phenomenal Content. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    Existentialist accounts maintain that visual phenomenal content takes the logical form of an existentially quantified sentence. These accounts do not make phenomenal content specific enough. Singularist accounts posit a singular content in which the seen object is a constituent. These accounts make phenomenal content too specific. My account gets the specificity of visual phenomenal content just right. My account begins with John Searle’s suggestion that visual experience represents an object as seen, moves this relation outside the scope of the existential (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Tim Fowler (forthcoming). Perfectionism for Children, Anti-Perfectionism for Adults. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-19.
    This paper explores the debate between perfectionists and anti-perfectionists in the context of children. It suggests that the most influential and compelling arguments in favour of anti-perfectionism are adult-centric. It does this by considering four leading reasons given in favour of anti-perfectionism and shows that none apply in the case of children. In so doing, the paper defends a perfectionist account of upbringing from the attacks made against perfectionism more generally. Furthermore, because the refutation of the various anti-perfectionist arguments are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Andrew Howat (forthcoming). Prospects for Peircean Truth. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-23.
    Peircean Truth (PT) is the view that truth is in some sense epistemically constrained, constrained that is by what we would, if we inquired long enough and well enough, eventually come to believe. Contemporary Peirceans offer various different formulations of the view, which can make it difficult, particularly for critics, to see exactly how PT differs from popular alternatives such as correspondence theories or deflationism. This article, therefore, considers four possible formulations of PT, and sets out the different objections and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Kristján Kristjánsson (forthcoming). Pity: A Mitigated Defence. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-22.
    The aim of this article is to offer a mitigated moral justification of a much maligned emotional trait, pity, in the Aristotelian sense of ?pain at deserved bad fortune?. I lay out Aristotle's taxonomic map of pity and its surrounding conceptual terrain and argue ? by rehearsing modern accounts ? that this map is not anachronistic with respect to contemporary conceptions. I then offer an ?Aristotelian? (albeit not Aristotle's) moral justification of pity, not as a full virtue intrinsically related to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. James Bohman (forthcoming). Constituting Humanity: Universal Political Rights and the Human Community. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Axel Gosseries (forthcoming). Cosmopolitan Luck Egalitarianism and Climate Change. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Aaron James (forthcoming). . Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-19.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Don Ross (forthcoming). Critical Notice of Ron McClamrock "Existential Cognition". Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    McClamrock argues for a thesis he calls radical externalism' in the behavioral and cognitive sciences. In my paper, I contend that McClamrock's thesis, though true, is not radical. This is because he urges externalism with respect to cognitive task-individuation and task-explanation, both of which are standard practice in the relevant disciplines. Semantic externalism may remain contentious, I argue; but the sense in which philosophers continue to argue about it has little bearing on the actual conduct of cognitive science. I conclude (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Robert Ware & K. Nielsen (forthcoming). Analyzing Marxism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues