Year:

  1. Luc Ciompi (2003). Reflections on the Role of Emotions in Consciousness and Subjectivity, From the Perspective of Affect-Logic. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):181-196.
    The phenomena of human consciousness and subjectivity are explored from the perspective of affect-logic, a comprehensive meta-theory of the interactions between emotion and cognition based mainly on cognitive and social psychology, psychopathology, neurobiology Piaget?s genetic epistemology, psychoanalysis, and evolutionary science. According to this theory, overt or covert affective-cognitive interactions are obligatorily present in all mental activity, seemingly ?neutral? thinking included. Emotions continually exert numerous so-called operator-effects, both linear and nonlinear, on attention, on memory and on comprehensive thought, or logic in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. John Cogan (2003). Emotion and the Growth of Consciousness: Gaining Insight Through a Phenomenology of Rage. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):207-241.
    Some attempts to understand emotion have failed to account for important features of our emotional experience ? notably, the experience of gaining insight when we express our emotions. In this essay I will hold that if we properly understand emotions, then we see that the expression of emotion contributes to the growth of consciousness by providing a process wherein consciousness can recognize and reclaim its inherent wholeness, and thereby overcome fragmentation. Hence, in this essay I will strive to: (1) demonstrate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Nicholas Georgalis (2003). The Fiction of Phenomenal Intentionality. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):243-256.
    This paper argues that there is no such thing as ?phenomenal intentionality?. The arguments used by its advocates rely upon an appeal to ?what it is like? (WIL) to attend on some occasion to one?s intentional state. I argue that there is an important asymmetry in the application of the WIL phenomenon to sensory and intentional states. Advocates of ?phenomenal intentionality? fail to recognize this, but this asymmetry undermines their arguments for phenomenal intentionality. The broader issue driving the advocacy of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. L. S. Greenberg (2003). Review of “Emotions, Qualia and Consciousness” by Alfred Kaszniak (Ed.). [REVIEW] Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):327-333.
  5. L. S. Greenberg (2003). Alfred Kaszniak (Ed.): Emotions, Qualia and Consciousness. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):327-332.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. R. Joseph (2003). Emotional Trauma and Childhood Amnesia. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):151-179.
    It has been reported that, on average, most adults recall first memories formed around age 3.5. In general, most first memories are positive. However, whether these first memories tend to be visual or verbal and whether the period for childhood amnesia (CA) is greater for visual or verbal or for positive versus negative memories has not been determined. Because negative, stressful experiences disrupt memory and can injure memory centers such as the hippocampus and amygdala, and since adults who were traumatized (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. S. L. (2003). Review of “Emotions, Qualia and Consciousness” by Alfred Kaszniak (Ed.). [REVIEW] Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):327-333.
  8. J. Panksepp & N. Gordon (2003). The Instinctual Basis of Human Affect: Affective Imaging of Laughter and Crying. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):197-205.
    The goal of this study was to evaluate affective changes induced during mental imaging of instinctual action patterns. Subjects were first trained to simulate the bodily rhythms of laughter and crying and were then trained to image these processes without any movement. The mere imagination of the motor imagery of laughter and crying were sufficient to significantly facilitate happy and sad mood ratings as monitored by subjective self-report. In contrast, no changes in mood were reported while imaging the affectively neutral (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. H. M. Ravven (2003). Spinoza’s Anticipation of Contemporary Affective Neuroscience. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):257-290.
    Spinoza speculated on how ethics could emerge from biology and psychology rather than disrupt them and recent evidence suggests he might have gotten it right. His radical deconstruction and reconstruction of ethics is supported by a number of avenues of research in the cognitive and neurosciences. This paper gathers together and presents a composite picture of recent research that supports Spinoza’s theory of the emotions and of the natural origins of ethics. It enumerates twelve naturalist claims of Spinoza that now (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Mikko Salmela (2003). Intentionality and Feeling in Emotions: A Reply to Ben-Ze'ev. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):291-305.
  11. Leslie Smith (2003). Internality of Mental Representation: Twenty Questions for Interactivism. Comment. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):307-326.
  12. Leslie Smith (2003). Internality of Mental Representation. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2).
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. P. Zachar (2003). Review of “Worlds of Experience: Interweaving Philosophical and Clinical Dimensions in Psychoanalysis” by Robert D. Stolorow, George E. Atwood, and Donna M. Orange. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):333-340.
  14. P. Zachar (2003). Robert D. Stolorow, George E. Atwood, and Donna M. Orange: Worlds of Experience: Interweaving Philosophical and Clinical Dimensions in Psychoanalysis. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):333-340.
  15. M. Balconi & U. Pozzoli (2003). ERPs (Event-Related Potentials), Semantic Attribution, and Facial Expression of Emotions. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):63-80.
    ERPs (event-related potentials) correlates are largely used in cognitive psychology and specifically for analysis of semantic information processing. Previous research has underlined a strong correlation between a negative-ongoing wave (N400), more frontally distributed, and semantic linguistic or extra-linguistic anomalies. With reference to the extra-linguistic domain, our experiment analyzed ERP variation in a semantic task of comprehension of emotional facial expressions. The experiment explored the effect of expectancy violation when subjects observed congruous or incongruous emotional facial patterns. Four prototypical (anger, sadness, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Mark H. Bickhard (2003). Some Notes on Internal and External Relations and Representation. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):101-110.
    Internal relations are those relations that are intrinsic to the nature of one or more of the relata. They are a kind of essential relation, rather than an essential property. For example, an arc of a circle is internally related to the center of that circle in the sense that.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Carrie Figdor (2003). Can Mental Representations Be Triggering Causes? Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):43-61.
    Fred Dretske?s (1988) account of the causal role of intentional mental states was widely criticized for missing the target: he explained why a type of intentional state causes the type of bodily motion it does rather than some other type, when what we wanted was an account of how the intentional properties of these states play a causal role in each singular causal relation with a token bodily motion. I argue that the non-reductive metaphysics that Dretske defends for his account (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. R. W. Gibbs Jr & G. C. Van Orden (2003). Are Emotional Expressions Intentional?: A Self-Organizational Approach. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):1-16.
    This paper discusses the debate over whether emotional expressions are spontaneous or intentional actions. We describe a variety of empirical evidence supporting these two possibilities. But we argue that the spontaneous-intentional distinction fails to explain the psychological dynamics of emotional expressions. We claim that a complex systems perspective on intentions, as self-organized critical states, may yield a unified view of emotional expressions as a consequence of situated action. This account simultaneously acknowledges the embodied status of environment, evolution, culture and mind (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. M. Hocutt (2003). Review of “the Blank Slate” by Steven Pinker. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):135-143.
  20. M. Hocutt (2003). Steven Pinker: The Blank Slate. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):135-142.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. A. J. & L. K. (2003). Intentional Avoidance and Social Understanding in Repressors and Nonrepressors: Two Functions for Emotion Experience? Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):17-42.
    Two putative functions of emotion experience — its roles in intentional action and in social understanding — were investigated using a group of individuals (repressors) known to have impaired anxiety experience. Repressors, low-anxious, high-anxious, and defensive high-anxious individuals were asked to give a public presentation, and then given the opportunity to avoid the presentation. Repressors were the group most likely to avoid giving the presentation, but were the least likely to give an emotional explanation for their avoidance. By contrast, they (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. John A. Lambie & Kevin L. Baker (2003). Intentional Avoidance and Social Understanding in Repressers and Nonrepressors: Two Functions for Emotion Experience? Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):17-42.
    Two putative functions of emotion experience ? its roles in intentional action and in social understanding ? were investigated using a group of individuals (repressors) known to have impaired anxiety experience. Repressors, low-anxious, high-anxious, and defensive high-anxious individuals were asked to give a public presentation, and then given the opportunity to avoid the presentation. Repressors were the group most likely to avoid giving the presentation, but were the least likely to give an emotional explanation for their avoidance. By contrast, they (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. H. M. (2003). Some Notes on Internal and External Relations and Representation. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):101-110.
  24. Jason Megill (2003). What Role Do the Emotions Play in Cognition?: Towards a New Alternative to Cognitive Theories of Emotion. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):81-100.
    This paper has two aims: (1) to point the way towards a novel alternative to cognitive theories of emotion, and (2) to delineate a number of different functions that the emotions play in cognition, functions that become visible from outside the framework of cognitive theories. First, I hold that the Higher Order Representational (HOR) theories of consciousness — as generally formulated — are inadequate insofar as they fail to account for selective attention. After posing this dilemma, I resolve it in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jason L. Megill (2003). What Role Do the Emotions Play in Cognition? Towards a New Alternative to Cognitive Theories of Emotion. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):81-100.
    This paper has two aims: (1) to point the way towards a novel alternative to cognitive theories of emotion, and (2) to delineate a number of different functions that the emotions play in cognition, functions that become visible from outside the framework of cognitive theories. First, I hold that the Higher Order Representational (HOR) theories of consciousness ? as generally formulated ? are inadequate insofar as they fail to account for selective attention. After posing this dilemma, I resolve it in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jaak Panksepp (2003). Review Article: "Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain" by A. Damasio. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):111-134.
  27. Jaak Panksepp (2003). Damasio's Error? Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):111-134.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. D. R. (2003). Review of “the Hidden Genius of Emotion: Lifespan Transformations of Personality” by Carol Magai and Jeanette Haviland-Jones. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):148-150.
  29. W. R. & C. G. (2003). Are Emotional Expressions Intentional?: A Self-Organizational Approach. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):1-16.
    This paper discusses the debate over whether emotional expressions are spontaneous or intentional actions. We describe a variety of empirical evidence supporting these two possibilities. But we argue that the spontaneous-intentional distinction fails to explain the psychological dynamics of emotional expressions. We claim that a complex systems perspective on intentions, as self-organized critical states, may yield a unified view of emotional expressions as a consequence of situated action. This account simultaneously acknowledges the embodied status of environment, evolution, culture and mind (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. J. Radden (2003). Review of “Passionate Engines: What Emotions Reveal About Mind and Artificial Intelligence” by Craig DeLancey. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):143-148.
  31. R. D. Stolorow (2003). Review of “the Hidden Genius of Emotion: Lifespan Transformations of Personality” by Carol Magai and Jeanette Haviland-Jones. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):148-150.
  32. R. D. Stolorow (2003). Carol Magai and Jeanette Haviland-Jones: The Hidden Genius of Emotion: Lifespan Transformations of Personality. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):148-150.
 Previous issues
  
Next issues