Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  7
    Alina Coman (forthcoming). Emerging Technologies in the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Ethics: Sufferers’ Accounts of Treatment Strategies and Authenticity. Health Care Analysis:1-13.
    New neural models for anorexia nervosa are emerging as a result of increased research on the neurobiology of AN, and these offer a rationale for the development of new treatment technologies such as neuromodulation. The emergence of such treatment technologies raises new ethical questions; however these have been little discussed for AN. In this article, I take an empirical approach and explore how young women who suffer from AN perceive treatment technologies in light of the concept of authenticity. Interview data (...)
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  2.  4
    Divine Ndonbi Banyubala (forthcoming). Posthumous Organ Retention and Use in Ghana: Regulating Individual, Familial and Societal Interests. Health Care Analysis:1-20.
    The question of whether individuals retain interests or can be harmed after death is highly contentious, particularly within the context of deceased organ retrieval, retention and use. This paper argues that posthumous interests and/or harms can and do exist in the Konkomba (and wider Ghanaian) traditional setting through the concept of ancestorship, a reputational concept of immense cultural and existential significance in this setting. I adopt Joel Feinberg’s account of harms as a setback to interests. The paper argues that a (...)
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  3.  2
    Celiane Camargo-Borges & Murilo Santos Moscheta (forthcoming). Health 2.0: Relational Resources for the Development of Quality in Healthcare. Health Care Analysis:1-11.
    Traditional approaches in healthcare have been challenged giving way to broader forms of users’ participation in treatment. In this article we present the Health 2.0 movement as an example of relational and participatory practices in healthcare. Health 2.0 is an approach in which participation is the major aim, aspiring to reshape the system into more collaborative and less hierarchical relationships. We offer two illustrations in order to discuss how Health 2.0 is related and can contribute to a positive uptake of (...)
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  4.  2
    John Coggon (forthcoming). Editorial: Advancing Debates in Health Care Analysis. Health Care Analysis:1-2.
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  5.  3
    David DeGrazia (forthcoming). Ethical Reflections on Genetic Enhancement with the Aim of Enlarging Altruism. Health Care Analysis:1-16.
    When it comes to caring about and helping those in need, our imaginations tend to be weak and our motivation tends to be parochial. This is a major moral problem in view of how much unmet need there is in the world and how much material capacity there is to address that need. With this problem in mind, the present paper will focus on genetic means to the enhancement of a moral capacity—a disposition to altruism—and of a cognitive capacity that (...)
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  6.  1
    Andrew Edgar & Stephen Pattison (forthcoming). Flourishing in Health Care. Health Care Analysis:1-13.
    The purpose of this paper is to offer an account of ‘flourishing’ that is relevant to health care provision, both in terms of the flourishing of the individual patient and carer, and in terms of the flourishing of the caring institution. It is argued that, unlike related concepts such as ‘happiness’, ‘well-being’ or ‘quality of life’, ‘flourishing’ uniquely has the power to capture the importance of the vulnerability of human being. Drawing on the likes of Heidegger and Nussbaum, it is (...)
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  7.  1
    Éric Gagnon, Michèle Clément & Lilianne Bordeleau (forthcoming). Speaking Out and Being Heard Residents’ Committees in Quebec’s Residential Long-Term Care Centre. Health Care Analysis:1-15.
    Residents’ councils in Quebec’s residential and long-term care centres have the mandate to promote the improvement of living conditions for residents, to assess their level of satisfaction, and to defend their rights. Based on two studies on the autonomy of councils, we examined how committees can express themselves on topics other than those the management is already aware of, to reveal various previously unknown aspects of the services, and to voice unexpressed concerns. We are especially interested in what makes management (...)
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  8.  6
    Kalle Grill & Angus Dawson (forthcoming). Ethical Frameworks in Public Health Decision-Making: Defending a Value-Based and Pluralist Approach. Health Care Analysis:1-17.
    A number of ethical frameworks have been proposed to support decision-making in public health and the evaluation of public health policy and practice. This is encouraging, since ethical considerations are of paramount importance in health policy. However, these frameworks have various deficiencies, in part because they incorporate substantial ethical positions. In this article, we discuss and criticise a framework developed by James Childress and Ruth Bernheim, which we consider to be the state of the art in the field. Their framework (...)
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  9.  4
    Kor Grit & Teun Zuiderent-Jerak (forthcoming). Making Markets in Long-Term Care: Or How a Market Can Work by Being Invisible. Health Care Analysis:1-18.
    Many Western countries have introduced market principles in healthcare. The newly introduced financial instrument of “care-intensity packages” in the Dutch long-term care sector fit this development since they have some characteristics of a market device. However, policy makers and care providers positioned these instruments as explicitly not belonging to the general trend of marketisation in healthcare. Using a qualitative case study approach, we study the work that the two providers have done to fit these instruments to their organisations and how (...)
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  10. Gill Haddow, Shawn H. E. Harmon & Leah Gilman (forthcoming). Implantable Smart Technologies : Defining the ‘Sting’ in Data and Device. Health Care Analysis:1-18.
    In a world surrounded by smart objects from sensors to automated medical devices, the ubiquity of ‘smart’ seems matched only by its lack of clarity. In this article, we use our discussions with expert stakeholders working in areas of implantable medical devices such as cochlear implants, implantable cardiac defibrillators, deep brain stimulators and in vivo biosensors to interrogate the difference facets of smart in ‘implantable smart technologies’, considering also whether regulation needs to respond to the autonomy that such artefacts carry (...)
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  11. A. M. Henk (forthcoming). Have JT. Choosing Core Health Services in the Netherlands. Health Care Analysis.
     
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  12.  7
    Bjørn Hofmann (forthcoming). Obesity as a Socially Defined Disease: Philosophical Considerations and Implications for Policy and Care. Health Care Analysis:1-15.
    Obesity has generated significant worries amongst health policy makers and has obtained increased attention in health care. Obesity is unanimously defined as a disease in the health care and health policy literature. However, there are pragmatic and not principled reasons for this. This warrants an analysis of obesity according to standard conceptions of disease in the literature of philosophy of medicine. According to theories and definitions of disease referring to internal processes, obesity is not a disease. Obesity undoubtedly can result (...)
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  13.  2
    Stephen Holland & David Stocks (forthcoming). Trust and Its Role in the Medical Encounter. Health Care Analysis:1-15.
    This paper addresses two research questions. The first is theoretical: What is trust? In the first half of this paper we present a distinctive tripartite analysis. We describe three attitudes, here called reliance, specific trust and general trust, each of which is characterised and illustrated. We argue that these attitudes are related, but not reducible, to one another. We suggest that the current impasse in the analysis of trust is in part due to the fact that some writers allude to (...)
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  14.  5
    Naomi Rebecca Hughes (forthcoming). How Does Organisational Literacy Impact Access to Health Care for Homeless Individuals? Health Care Analysis:1-17.
    This article describes a study that examined the experiences of 27 individuals who frequented an Open Access homeless shelter in Toronto, Canada. The overarching aim of this study was to map the social organisation of health care in Toronto, with particular regards to the ways in which literacy, or the lack of literacy, mediates the experiences of homeless individuals attempting to gain access to health care. While terms such as “literate” or “illiterate” might be seen to reflect an individual’s level (...)
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  15.  6
    Niklas Juth (forthcoming). For the Sake of Justice: Should We Prioritize Rare Diseases? Health Care Analysis:1-20.
    This article is about the justifiability of accepting worse cost effectiveness for orphan drugs, that is, treatments for rare diseases, in a publicly financed health care system. Recently, three arguments have been presented that may be used in favour of exceptionally advantageous economic terms for orphan drugs. These arguments share the common feature of all referring to considerations of justice or fairness: the argument of the irrelevance of group size, the argument from the principle of need, and the argument of (...)
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  16.  2
    Lieslot Mahieu, Luc Anckaert & Chris Gastmans (forthcoming). Intimacy and Sexuality in Institutionalized Dementia Care: Clinical-Ethical Considerations. Health Care Analysis:1-20.
    Intimacy and sexuality expressed by nursing home residents with dementia remains an ethically sensitive issue for care facilities, nursing staff and family members. Dealing with residents’ sexual longings and behaviour is extremely difficult, putting a burden on the caregivers as well as on the residents themselves and their relatives. The parties in question often do not know how to react when residents express themselves sexually. The overall aim of this article is to provide a number of clinical-ethical considerations addressing the (...)
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  17.  5
    Alex McKeown (forthcoming). Critical Realism and Empirical Bioethics: A Methodological Exposition. Health Care Analysis:1-21.
    This paper shows how critical realism can be used to integrate empirical data and philosophical analysis within ‘empirical bioethics’. The term empirical bioethics, whilst appearing oxymoronic, simply refers to an interdisciplinary approach to the resolution of practical ethical issues within the biological and life sciences, integrating social scientific, empirical data with philosophical analysis. It seeks to achieve a balanced form of ethical deliberation that is both logically rigorous and sensitive to context, to generate normative conclusions that are practically applicable to (...)
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  18.  2
    Jonathan Montgomery (forthcoming). Bioethics as a Governance Practice. Health Care Analysis:1-21.
    Bioethics can be considered as a topic, an academic discipline, a field of study, an enterprise in persuasion. The historical specificity of the forms bioethics takes is significant, and raises questions about some of these approaches. Bioethics can also be considered as a governance practice, with distinctive institutions and structures. The forms this practice takes are also to a degree country specific, as the paper illustrates by drawing on the author’s UK experience. However, the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics can (...)
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  19.  1
    Mary Morton (forthcoming). We Can Work It Out: The Importance of Rupture and Repair Processes in Infancy and Adult Life for Flourishing. Health Care Analysis:1-14.
    This paper argues that insights into infant emotional development, particularly the capacity to engage with rupture and repair, can be applied to the understanding and promotion of flourishing in later life, individually and socially. Starting with the Queen’s visit to the Republic of Ireland as an example of successful social repair after rupture that enables flourishing, the paper goes on to outline some relevant psychological theory that undergirds this. It then considers some of the practical relevance and problems that apply (...)
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  20.  7
    Lieke Oldenhof, Annemiek Stoopendaal & Kim Putters (forthcoming). Professional Talk: How Middle Managers Frame Care Workers as Professionals. Health Care Analysis:1-24.
    This paper examines how middle managers in the long term care sector use the discourse of professionalism to create ‘appropriate’ work conduct of care workers. Using Watson’s concept of professional talk, we study how managers in their daily work talk about professionalism of vocationally skilled care workers. Based on observations and recordings of mundane conversations by middle managers, we found four different professional talks that co-exist: (1) appropriate looks and conduct, (2) reflectivity about personal values and ‘good’ care, (3) methodical (...)
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  21.  18
    Nicky Priaulx, Martin Weinel & Anthony Wrigley (forthcoming). Rethinking Moral Expertise. Health Care Analysis:1-14.
    We argue that the way in which the concept of expertise is understood and invoked has prevented progress in the debate as to whether moral philosophers can be said to be ‘moral experts’. We offer an account of expertise that draws on the role of tacit knowledge in order to provide a basis upon which the debate can progress. Our analysis consists of three parts. In the first part we highlight two specific problems in the way that the concept of (...)
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  22.  8
    Laura Pritchard-Jones (forthcoming). Ageism and Autonomy in Health Care: Explorations Through a Relational Lens. Health Care Analysis:1-18.
    Ageism within the context of care has attracted increasing attention in recent years. Similarly, autonomy has developed into a prominent concept within health care law and ethics. This paper explores the way that ageism, understood as a set of negative attitudes about old age or older people, may impact on an older person’s ability to make maximally autonomous decisions within health care. In particular, by appealing to feminist constructions of autonomy as relational, I will argue that the key to establishing (...)
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  23.  2
    Catherine Rhodes (forthcoming). Potential International Approaches to Ownership/Control of Human Genetic Resources. Health Care Analysis:1-18.
    In its governance activities for genetic resources, the international community has adopted various approaches to their ownership, including: free access; common heritage of mankind; intellectual property rights; and state sovereign rights. They have also created systems which combine elements of these approaches. While governance of plant and animal genetic resources is well-established internationally, there has not yet been a clear approach selected for human genetic resources. Based on assessment of the goals which international governance of human genetic resources ought to (...)
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  24.  5
    Murielle Rondeau-Lutz & Jean-Christophe Weber (forthcoming). The Absent Interpreter in Administrative Detention Center Medical Units. Health Care Analysis:1-18.
    The particular situation of the French administrative detention center medical units appears to be an exemplary case to study the difficulties facing medical practice. Indeed, the starting point of our inquiry was an amazing observation that needed to be addressed and understood: why are professional interpreters so seldom requested in ADC medical units, where one would expect that they would be “naturally” present? Aiming to fully explore the meanings of the “absent interpreter”, this article takes into account the possible meanings (...)
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  25.  6
    A. M. Ruissen, T. A. Abma, A. J. L. M. Van Balkom, G. Meynen & G. A. M. Widdershoven (forthcoming). Moving Perspectives on Patient Competence: A Naturalistic Case Study in Psychiatry. Health Care Analysis:1-15.
    Patient competence, defined as the ability to reason, appreciate, understand, and express a choice is rarely discussed in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and coercive measures are seldom used. Nevertheless, a psychiatrist of psychologist may doubt whether OCD patients who refuse treatment understand their disease and the consequences of not being treated, which could result in tension between respecting the patient’s autonomy and beneficence. The purpose of this article is to develop a notion of competence that is grounded in (...)
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  26.  4
    Maria K. Sheppard (forthcoming). Fallacy or Functionality: Law and Policy of Patient Treatment Choice in the NHS. Health Care Analysis:1-22.
    It has been claimed that beneath the government rhetoric of patient choice, no real choice exists either in law or in National Health Service (NHS) policy (Whiteman in Health Care Anal 21:146–170, 2013). Thus, choice is considered to be a fallacy in that patients are not able to demand specific treatment, but are only able to express preferences amongst the available options. This article argues that, rather than considering choice only in terms of patient autonomy or consumer rights, choice ought (...)
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  27.  4
    Miranda M. W. C. Snoeren, Bienke M. Janssen, Theo J. H. Niessen & Tineke A. Abma (forthcoming). Nurturing Cultural Change in Care for Older People: Seeing the Cherry Tree Blossom. Health Care Analysis:1-25.
    There is a need for person-centred approaches and empowerment of staff within the residential care for older people; a movement called ‘culture change’. There is however no single path for achieving culture change. With the aim of increasing understandings about cultural change processes and the promotion of cultural values and norms associated with person-centred practices, this article presents an action research project set on a unit in the Netherlands providing care for older people with dementia. The project is presented as (...)
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  28.  1
    Jeremy Snyder, Rory Johnston, Valorie A. Crooks, Jeff Morgan & Krystyna Adams (forthcoming). How Medical Tourism Enables Preferential Access to Care: Four Patterns From the Canadian Context. Health Care Analysis:1-13.
    Medical tourism is the practice of traveling across international borders with the intention of accessing medical care, paid for out-of-pocket. This practice has implications for preferential access to medical care for Canadians both through inbound and outbound medical tourism. In this paper, we identify four patterns of medical tourism with implications for preferential access to care by Canadians: Inbound medical tourism to Canada’s public hospitals; Inbound medical tourism to a First Nations reserve; Canadian patients opting to go abroad for medical (...)
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  29.  5
    Georg Spielthenner (forthcoming). The Principle-Based Method of Practical Ethics. Health Care Analysis:1-15.
    This paper is about the methodology of doing practical ethics. There is a variety of methods employed in ethics. One of them is the principle-based approach, which has an established place in ethical reasoning. In everyday life, we often judge the rightness and wrongness of actions by their conformity to principles, and the appeal to principles plays a significant role in practical ethics, too. In this paper, I try to provide a better understanding of the nature of principle-based reasoning. To (...)
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  30.  3
    Catherine Stanton (forthcoming). Genetic Transmission of Disease: A Legal Harm? Health Care Analysis:1-18.
    This paper considers whether existing law could potentially be used to criminalize the transmission of genetic disease. The paper argues that even if an offence could be made out, the criminal law should not be involved in this context for many reasons, including the need to protect reproductive liberty and pregnant women’s rights. The paper also examines whether there might be scope for civil claims between reproductive partners for a ‘failure to warn’ of potential genetic harm and argues there are (...)
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  31. M. J. Trappenburg & H. Bovenkamp (forthcoming). Reconsidering Patient Participation in Guideline Development. Health Care Analysis.
     
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  32.  3
    Lieke van der Scheer, Elisa Garcia, Anna Laura van der Laan, Simone van der Burg & Marianne Boenink (forthcoming). The Benefits of Patient Involvement for Translational Research. Health Care Analysis:1-17.
    The question we raise in this paper is, whether patient involvement might be a beneficial way to help determine and achieve the aims of translational research and, if so, how to proceed. TR is said to ensure a more effective movement of basic scientific findings to relevant and useful clinical applications. In view of the fact that patients are supposed to be the primary beneficiaries of such translation and also have relevant knowledge based on their experience, listening to their voice (...)
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  33.  82
    Else Vogel (forthcoming). Clinical Specificities in Obesity Care: The Transformations and Dissolution of 'Will' and 'Drives'. Health Care Analysis:1-17.
    Public debate about who or what is to blame for the rising rates of obesity and overweight shifts between two extreme opinions. The first posits overweight as the result of a lack of individual will, the second as the outcome of bodily drives, potentially triggered by the environment. Even though apparently clashing, these positions are in fact two faces of the same liberal coin. When combined, drives figure as a complication on the road to health, while a strong will should (...)
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  34.  2
    Duncan Wilson (forthcoming). A Troubled Past? Reassessing Ethics in the History of Tissue Culture. Health Care Analysis:1-14.
    Recent books, articles and plays about the ‘immortal’ HeLa cell line have prompted renewed interest in the history of tissue culture methods that were first employed in 1907 and became common experimental tools during the twentieth century. Many of these sources claim tissue cultures like HeLa had a “troubled past” because medical researchers did not seek informed consent before using tissues in research, contravening a long held desire for self-determination on the part of patients and the public. In this article, (...)
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