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Forthcoming articles
  1. Alina Coman (forthcoming). Emerging Technologies in the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Ethics: Sufferers' Accounts of Treatment Strategies and Authenticity. Health Care Analysis:1-13.
    New neural models for anorexia nervosa (AN) are emerging as a result of increased research on the neurobiology of AN, and these offer a rationale for the development of new treatment technologies such as neuromodulation. The emergence of such treatment technologies raises new ethical questions; however these have been little discussed for AN. In this article, I take an empirical approach and explore how young women who suffer from AN perceive treatment technologies in light of the concept of authenticity. Interview (...)
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  2. Divine Ndonbi Banyubala (forthcoming). Posthumous Organ Retention and Use in Ghana: Regulating Individual, Familial and Societal Interests. Health Care Analysis:1-20.
    The question of whether individuals retain interests or can be harmed after death is highly contentious, particularly within the context of deceased organ retrieval, retention and use. This paper argues that posthumous interests and/or harms can and do exist in the Konkomba (and wider Ghanaian) traditional setting through the concept of ancestorship, a reputational concept of immense cultural and existential significance in this setting. I adopt Joel Feinberg’s account of harms as a setback to interests. The paper argues that a (...)
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  3. Emma C. Bullock (forthcoming). Free Choice and Patient Best Interests. Health Care Analysis:1-19.
    In medical practice, the doctrine of informed consent is generally understood to have priority over the medical practitioner’s duty of care to her patient. A common consequentialist argument for the prioritisation of informed consent above the duty of care involves the claim that respect for a patient’s free choice is the best way of protecting that patient’s best interests; since the patient has a special expertise over her values and preferences regarding non-medical goods she is ideally placed to make a (...)
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  4. Celiane Camargo-Borges & Murilo Santos Moscheta (forthcoming). Health 2.0: Relational Resources for the Development of Quality in Healthcare. Health Care Analysis:1-11.
    Traditional approaches in healthcare have been challenged giving way to broader forms of users’ participation in treatment. In this article we present the Health 2.0 movement as an example of relational and participatory practices in healthcare. Health 2.0 is an approach in which participation is the major aim, aspiring to reshape the system into more collaborative and less hierarchical relationships. We offer two illustrations in order to discuss how Health 2.0 is related and can contribute to a positive uptake of (...)
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  5. A. M. Henk (forthcoming). Have JT. Choosing Core Health Services in the Netherlands. Health Care Analysis.
     
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  6. Naomi Rebecca Hughes (forthcoming). How Does Organisational Literacy Impact Access to Health Care for Homeless Individuals? Health Care Analysis:1-17.
    This article describes a study that examined the experiences of 27 individuals who frequented an Open Access homeless shelter in Toronto, Canada. The overarching aim of this study was to map the social organisation of health care in Toronto, with particular regards to the ways in which literacy, or the lack of literacy, mediates the experiences of homeless individuals attempting to gain access to health care. While terms such as “literate” or “illiterate” might be seen to reflect an individual’s level (...)
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  7. Niklas Juth (forthcoming). For the Sake of Justice: Should We Prioritize Rare Diseases? Health Care Analysis:1-20.
    This article is about the justifiability of accepting worse cost effectiveness for orphan drugs, that is, treatments for rare diseases, in a publicly financed health care system. Recently, three arguments have been presented that may be used in favour of exceptionally advantageous economic terms for orphan drugs. These arguments share the common feature of all referring to considerations of justice or fairness: the argument of the irrelevance of group size, the argument from the principle of need, and the argument of (...)
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  8. Lieslot Mahieu, Luc Anckaert & Chris Gastmans (forthcoming). Intimacy and Sexuality in Institutionalized Dementia Care: Clinical-Ethical Considerations. Health Care Analysis:1-20.
    Intimacy and sexuality expressed by nursing home residents with dementia remains an ethically sensitive issue for care facilities, nursing staff and family members. Dealing with residents’ sexual longings and behaviour is extremely difficult, putting a burden on the caregivers as well as on the residents themselves and their relatives. The parties in question often do not know how to react when residents express themselves sexually. The overall aim of this article is to provide a number of clinical-ethical considerations addressing the (...)
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  9. Erik Malmqvist (forthcoming). Kidney Sales and the Analogy with Dangerous Employment. Health Care Analysis:1-15.
    Proponents of permitting living kidney sales often argue as follows. Many jobs involve significant risks; people are and should be free to take these risks in exchange for money; the risks involved in giving up a kidney are no greater than the risks involved in acceptable hazardous jobs; so people should be free to give up a kidney for money, too. This paper examines this frequently invoked but rarely analysed analogy. Two objections are raised. First, it is far from clear (...)
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  10. Lieke Oldenhof, Annemiek Stoopendaal & Kim Putters (forthcoming). Professional Talk: How Middle Managers Frame Care Workers as Professionals. Health Care Analysis:1-24.
    This paper examines how middle managers in the long term care sector use the discourse of professionalism to create ‘appropriate’ work conduct of care workers. Using Watson’s concept of professional talk, we study how managers in their daily work talk about professionalism of vocationally skilled care workers. Based on observations and recordings of mundane conversations by middle managers, we found four different professional talks that co-exist: (1) appropriate looks and conduct, (2) reflectivity about personal values and ‘good’ care, (3) methodical (...)
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  11. Nicky Priaulx, Martin Weinel & Anthony Wrigley (forthcoming). Rethinking Moral Expertise. Health Care Analysis:1-14.
    We argue that the way in which the concept of expertise is understood and invoked has prevented progress in the debate as to whether moral philosophers can be said to be ‘moral experts’. We offer an account of expertise that draws on the role of tacit knowledge in order to provide a basis upon which the debate can progress. Our analysis consists of three parts. In the first part we highlight two specific problems in the way that the concept of (...)
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  12. David B. Resnik (forthcoming). Food and Beverage Policies and Public Health Ethics. Health Care Analysis:1-12.
    Government food and beverage policies can play an important role in promoting public health. Few people would question this assumption. Difficult questions can arise, however, when policymakers, public health officials, citizens, and businesses deliberate about food and beverage policies, because competing values may be at stake, such as public health, individual autonomy, personal responsibility, economic prosperity, and fairness. An ethically justified policy strikes a reasonable among competing values by meeting the following criteria: (1) the policy serves important social goal(s); (2) (...)
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  13. Murielle Rondeau-Lutz & Jean-Christophe Weber (forthcoming). The Absent Interpreter in Administrative Detention Center Medical Units. Health Care Analysis:1-18.
    The particular situation of the French administrative detention center (ADC) medical units appears to be an exemplary case to study the difficulties facing medical practice. Indeed, the starting point of our inquiry was an amazing observation that needed to be addressed and understood: why are professional interpreters so seldom requested in ADC medical units, where one would expect that they would be “naturally” present? Aiming to fully explore the meanings of the “absent interpreter”, this article takes into account the possible (...)
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  14. A. M. Ruissen, T. A. Abma, A. J. L. M. Van Balkom, G. Meynen & G. A. M. Widdershoven (forthcoming). Moving Perspectives on Patient Competence: A Naturalistic Case Study in Psychiatry. Health Care Analysis:1-15.
    Patient competence, defined as the ability to reason, appreciate, understand, and express a choice is rarely discussed in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and coercive measures are seldom used. Nevertheless, a psychiatrist of psychologist may doubt whether OCD patients who refuse treatment understand their disease and the consequences of not being treated, which could result in tension between respecting the patient’s autonomy and beneficence. The purpose of this article is to develop a notion of competence that is grounded in (...)
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  15. Maria K. Sheppard (forthcoming). Fallacy or Functionality: Law and Policy of Patient Treatment Choice in the NHS. Health Care Analysis:1-22.
    It has been claimed that beneath the government rhetoric of patient choice, no real choice exists either in law or in National Health Service (NHS) policy (Whiteman in Health Care Anal 21:146–170, 2013). Thus, choice is considered to be a fallacy in that patients are not able to demand specific treatment, but are only able to express preferences amongst the available options. This article argues that, rather than considering choice only in terms of patient autonomy or consumer rights, choice ought (...)
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  16. Anna Smajdor & Daniela Cutas (forthcoming). Will Artificial Gametes End Infertility? Health Care Analysis:1-14.
    In this paper we will look at the various ways in which infertility can be understood and at how need for reproductive therapies can be construed. We will do this against the background of research with artificial gametes (AGs). Having explored these questions we will attempt to establish the degree to which technologies such as AGs could expand the array of choices that people have to reproduce and/or become parents. Finally, we will examine whether and in what ways the most (...)
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  17. Miranda M. W. C. Snoeren, Bienke M. Janssen, Theo J. H. Niessen & Tineke A. Abma (forthcoming). Nurturing Cultural Change in Care for Older People: Seeing the Cherry Tree Blossom. Health Care Analysis:1-25.
    There is a need for person-centred approaches and empowerment of staff within the residential care for older people; a movement called ‘culture change’. There is however no single path for achieving culture change. With the aim of increasing understandings about cultural change processes and the promotion of cultural values and norms associated with person-centred practices, this article presents an action research project set on a unit in the Netherlands providing care for older people with dementia. The project is presented as (...)
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  18. M. J. Trappenburg & H. Bovenkamp (forthcoming). Reconsidering Patient Participation in Guideline Development. Health Care Analysis.
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  19. Hanneke van der Meide, Gert Olthuis & Carlo Leget (forthcoming). Patient Participation in Hospital Care: How Equal is the Voice of the Client Council? Health Care Analysis:1-15.
    Patient participation in healthcare is highly promoted for democratic reasons. Older patients make up a large part of the hospital population but their voices are less easily heard by most patient participation instruments. The client council can be seen as an important medium to represent the interests of this increasing group of patients. Every Dutch healthcare institution is obliged to have a client council and its rights are legally established. This paper reports on a case study of a client council (...)
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  20. Else Vogel (forthcoming). Clinical Specificities in Obesity Care: The Transformations and Dissolution of 'Will' and 'Drives'. Health Care Analysis:1-17.
    Public debate about who or what is to blame for the rising rates of obesity and overweight shifts between two extreme opinions. The first posits overweight as the result of a lack of individual will, the second as the outcome of bodily drives, potentially triggered by the environment. Even though apparently clashing, these positions are in fact two faces of the same liberal coin. When combined, drives figure as a complication on the road to health, while a strong will should (...)
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  21. Rik Wehrens (forthcoming). The Potential of the Imitation Game Method in Exploring Healthcare Professionals' Understanding of the Lived Experiences and Practical Challenges of Chronically Ill Patients. Health Care Analysis:1-19.
    This paper explores the potential and relevance of an innovative sociological research method known as the Imitation Game for research in health care. Whilst this method and its potential have until recently only been explored within sociology, there are many interesting and promising facets that may render this approach fruitful within the health care field, most notably to questions about the experiential knowledge or ‘expertise’ of chronically ill patients (and the extent to which different health care professionals are able to (...)
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