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Forthcoming articles
  1. John Haglund (forthcoming). The View From Somewhere - Investigations Pertaining to the Implications of the Impurity of the Third- and the First-Person-Perspective. Continental Philosophy Review.
    The old duality that eventually came to produce the mind/body-problem indicates the problem of transcendental subjectivity. The enduring significance of this problem shows itself in a provocation of any paradigm that has become too objectivistic, too naturalistic – even too idealistic in a certain sense – and too forgetful of its own departure from a perspective always presumed. Analytic philosophy bears a tendency towards such a ‘view from nowhere’ which denies a fundamental subjective connection. The rebuttal of this position entails (...)
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  2.  27
    Todd S. Mei (forthcoming). Heidegger in the Machine: The Difference Between Techne and Mechane. Continental Philosophy Review:1-26.
    Machines are often employed in Heidegger’s philosophy as instances to illustrate specific features of modern technology. But what is it about machines that allows them to fulfill this role? This essay argues there is a unique ontological force to the machine that can be understood when looking at distinctions between techne and mechane in ancient Greek sources and applying these distinctions to a reading of Heidegger’s early thought on equipment and later thought on poiesis. Especially with respect to Heidegger’s appropriation (...)
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  3. Jack Reynolds (forthcoming). Merleau-Ponty's Gordian Knot: Transcendental Phenomenology, Empirical Science, and Naturalism. Continental Philosophy Review.
    In this paper, I want to explore a series of fertile ambiguities that Maurice Merleau-Ponty's work is premised upon and which are of major interest to contemporary philosophy today. These ambiguities concern some of the central methodological commitments of Merleau-Ponty's work, in particular: 1. his commitment (or otherwise) to transcendental phenomenology and his renovation of that tradition; and 2. his sustained engagement with empirical sciences (on an apparently level playing-field) that seems to deny the methodological autonomy of either philosophy or (...)
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  4.  3
    Antonio Calcagno (forthcoming). A Place for the Role of Community in the Structure of the State: Edith Stein and Edmund Husserl. Continental Philosophy Review:1-14.
    This essay argues that Stein’s view of the state can overcome Husserl’s skepticism about the state being an authentic, intense community rooted in solidarity while not negating his hope for the advent of a genuinely ethical, rational culture. Whereas Husserl places rationality and freedom within the framework of culture proper and not in the state, Stein sees the state as an extension of persons that can give the state its own free, deliberating and rational Ich kann.
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  5.  4
    Eran Dorfman (forthcoming). Overwriting the Body: Saint-Exupéry, Merleau-Ponty, Nancy. Continental Philosophy Review:1-16.
    In this paper I examine two limit cases in which the body is threatened: the experience of emergency as described by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s Flight to Arras, and the experience of illness as described by Jean-Luc Nancy in his autobiographical essay The Intruder. In the first case, the everyday relationship to the body is revealed to be illusionary; the body becomes a powerful yet obedient machine. In the second case, the everyday relationship to the body is also suspended, but this (...)
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  6.  5
    Maxime Doyon (forthcoming). Phenomenology and the Experience of the Historical. Continental Philosophy Review:1-10.
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  7.  3
    Dino Galetti (forthcoming). Of Levinas’ ‘Structure’ in Address to His Four ‘Others’. Continental Philosophy Review:1-24.
    It has long been accepted that one of Levinas’ major concerns is to establish an ethics of responsibility for the ‘other.’ Yet it has been deemed for decades, even by Levinasians, that his approach to that concern is ‘unsystematic’ and ‘not consistent.’ That situation arose because Levinas’ four terms for ‘other’ are difficult to translate, so his terms were first addressed by adopting English conventions. Such conventions have furthered Levinas scholarship, but our aim is to consider Levinas’ consistency: Hence we (...)
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  8. Terence Holden (forthcoming). Honneth, Kojeve and Levinas on Intersubjectivity and History. Continental Philosophy Review:1-21.
    I explore some of the challenges involved in establishing the intersubjective dynamic as the foundation for a normatively charged philosophy of history. I seek in addition to highlight the value of Levinas’ work for the field of recognition studies. Levinas in effect offers a transitional model of recognition between Kojeve and Honneth, and as such his work harbors the potential for addressing some of the difficulties which beset the work of both when it comes to formulating an understanding of recognition (...)
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  9.  2
    Matthew Lampert (forthcoming). Beyond the Politics of Reception: Jacques Rancière and the Politics of Art. Continental Philosophy Review:1-20.
    Jacques Rancière’s work has become a major reference point for discussions of art and politics. However, while Rancière’s negative theses are becoming widespread and well understood, his positive thesis is still poorly understood, owing partly to Rancière’s own formulation of the issue. I first clarify Rancière’s account of the links between politics and art. I then explore a gap in this account; Rancière has stuck too closely to a politics of art’s reception. I argue for a (...) of art production, which would expand the possible engagement between politics and art. (shrink)
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  10.  6
    Lode Lauwaert (forthcoming). Georges Bataille, a Reader of Marquis de Sade. On Nature, Sadistic Enjoyment, and Literature (Submitted). Continental Philosophy Review.
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  11. J. Colin McQuillan (forthcoming). Michel Foucault: Introduction to Kant's Anthropology. Translated by Roberto Nigro and Kate Briggs. Continental Philosophy Review.
     
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  12.  7
    Simone Neuber (forthcoming). Self-Awareness and Self-Deception: A Sartrean Perspective. Continental Philosophy Review:1-23.
    In spite of the fact that many find Jean-Paul Sartre’s account of la mauvaise foi puzzling, unclear and troublesome, he remains a recurring figure in the debate about self-deception. Indeed, Sartre’s exposition of self-deception is as puzzling as it is original. The primary task of my paper will be to expose why this is the case and to thereby correct a recurrent misunderstanding of Sartre’s theory of consciousness. In the end, will we see that Sartre offers the following theory: self-deception (...)
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  13.  4
    Justin Pack (forthcoming). Arendt’s Genealogy of Thinking. Continental Philosophy Review:1-14.
    This paper presents what I will call Arendt’s genealogy of thinking. My purpose in doing so is to strengthen Arendt’s critique of thoughtlessness which I believe is both a powerful, but underappreciated analytic tool and a consistent, but under-examined thread that occurs throughout Arendt’s oeuvre. To do so I revisit her phenomenology of thinking and the distinction between thinking and cognition she introduces in her last, unfinished work, The Life of the Mind. When read alongside the genealogy (...)
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  14.  4
    Christophe Perrin (forthcoming). From the They to the We: Heideggerian Antonomology. Continental Philosophy Review:1-28.
    This paper argues that there exists a Heideggerian antonomology and this not only in the broad sense of a simple study, but also in the strict sense of a full doctrine of personal pronouns. Traversing the whole of Heidegger’s work, I reconstitute the framework of this antonomology, from the connection of mineness and ipseity, to the difference between the I and the Self within the precedence of the latter over the former. I then rehearse its drama, from the They who (...)
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  15.  4
    Wayne Pomerleau (forthcoming). Matthew C. Altman: The Palgrave Handbook of German Idealism. Continental Philosophy Review:1-7.
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  16.  5
    Jacob Rogozinski (forthcoming). The Reversibility Which is the Ultimate Truth. Continental Philosophy Review:1-15.
    This article seeks to interrogate the intertwining of Truth and reversibility as presented in the unfinished work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty in The Visible and the Invisible. This relation raises three questions regarding the whole of Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy; namely, the status it confers to truth, the place it grants to the ego, and the notion of the “flesh of the world.”.
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  17.  12
    Matthew Sharpe (forthcoming). Killing the Father, Parmenides: On Lacan’s Anti-Philosophy. Continental Philosophy Review:1-24.
    This paper examines the historical claims about philosophy, dating back to Parmenides, that we argue underlie Jacques Lacan’s polemical provocations in the mid-1970s that his position was an “anti-philosophie”. Following an introduction surveying the existing literature on the subject, in part ii, we systematically present the account of classical philosophy Lacan has in mind when he declares psychoanalysis to be an antiphilosophy after 1975, assembling his claims about the history of ideas in Seminars XVII and XX in ways earlier contributions (...)
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  18.  6
    Samuel Cuff Snow (forthcoming). The Moment of Self-Transformation: Kierkegaard on Suffering and the Subject. Continental Philosophy Review:1-20.
    In his self-published periodical The Moment, Søren Kierkegaard warns his reader against the possibility of “useless suffering”. Not only that, he urges the reader to make use of her suffering. Taking this caution as a point of departure, I investigate the pseudonymous Johannes Climacus’ deliberations on ethico-religious suffering in the Postscript. I demonstrate that Climacus construes suffering as useful, and with that outlines an economy of suffering that Kierkegaard delineates across his pseudonymous and non-pseudonymous work. (...)
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  19.  5
    Patrick Stokes (forthcoming). The Problem of Spontaneous Goodness: From Kierkegaard to Løgstrup. Continental Philosophy Review:1-21.
    Historically, Western philosophy has struggled to accommodate, or has simply denied, the moral value of spontaneous, non-reflective action. One important exception is in the work of K.E. Løgstrup, whose phenomenological ethics involves a claim that the ‘ethical demand’ of care for the other can only be realized through spontaneous assent to ‘sovereign expressions of life’ such as trust and mercy. Løgstrup attacks Kierkegaard for devaluing spontaneous moral action, but as I argue, Kierkegaard too offers an implicit view of spontaneous moral (...)
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  20.  9
    Dylan Trigg (forthcoming). “The Indestructible, the Barbaric Principle”: The Role of Schelling in Merleau-Ponty’s Psychoanalysis. Continental Philosophy Review:1-19.
    The aim of this paper is to examine Merleau-Ponty’s idea of a “psychoanalysis of Nature”. My thesis is that in order to understand the creation of a Merleau-Pontean psychoanalysis, we need to ultimately understand the place of Schelling in Merleau-Ponty’s late thought. Through his dialogue with Schelling, Merleau-Ponty will be able to formulate not only a psychoanalysis of Nature, but also fulfil the ultimate task of phenomenology itself; namely, of identifying “what resists phenomenology—natural being, the ‘barbarous’ source Schelling spoke of” (...)
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  21.  7
    Jasper van Buuren (forthcoming). The Philosophical–Anthropological Foundations of Bennett and Hacker’s Critique of Neuroscience. Continental Philosophy Review:1-19.
    Bennett and Hacker criticize a number of neuroscientists and philosophers for attributing capacities which belong to the human being as a whole, like perceiving or deciding, to a “part” of the human being, viz. the brain. They call this type of mistake the “mereological fallacy”. Interestingly, the authors say that these capacities cannot be ascribed to the mind either. They reject not only materialistic monism but also Cartesian dualism, arguing that many predicates describing human life do not refer to (...)
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  22.  8
    Richard Westerman (forthcoming). Meaning, Memory and Identity: The Western Marxists’ Hermeneutic Subject. Continental Philosophy Review:1-24.
    The concept of the subject is at the core of many social movements that attempt to empower disadvantaged groups by identifying a basic subjectivity underlying and uniting such groups. Though otherwise supportive of such movements, recent continental philosophers and social theorists such as Althusser, Derrida, and Butler have criticized such notions of subjectivity, arguing that they presuppose false and harmful ideas of unity and substantiality as the ‘true’ essence of these groups. In this paper, I propose that one possibility for (...)
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