Year:

  1.  6
    David Elliot (2016). The Turn to Classification in Virtue Ethics: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):477-488.
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  2.  2
    Andrew Errington (2016). Authority and Reality in the Work of Oliver O’Donovan 1. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):371-385.
    Running throughout the work of Oliver O’Donovan is a discussion of the nature of authority, and its relation to reality, and to freedom. While holding fast to the maxim that authority is the correlate of freedom, O’Donovan’s understanding of authority moves, as a result of his engagement with the nature of political authority, to emphasise the idea of social mediation. This leads, in the most recent works, to a description of authority as an event in which reality is disclosed. Arguably, (...)
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  3.  3
    John Fitzgerald (2016). Book Review: Charles C. Camosy, Beyond the Abortion Wars: A Way Forward for a New Generation. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):489-492.
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  4.  2
    Dion Forster (2016). Book Review: Paulinus Ikechukwu Odozor CSSp, Morality Truly Christian, Truly African: Foundational, Methodological, and Theological Considerations. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):499-501.
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  5.  2
    Anthony J. Kelly (2016). Book Review: R. J. Snell, The Perspective of Love: Natural Law in a New Mode. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):506-508.
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  6.  3
    Jeremy Kidwell (2016). Book Review: Brent Waters, Christian Moral Theology in the Emerging Technoculture: From Human Back to Human. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):508-511.
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  7.  7
    D. M. McCarthy & C. R. Pinches (2016). Craft as a Place of Knowing in Natural Law. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):386-408.
    The article offers a proposal about natural law inquiry in terms of knowledge attendant in the practices of a craft. We begin by discussing Aristotle’s analogical use of crafts in considering knowledge of ethics and politics in the Nicomachean Ethics. We inquire further into craft as a way of knowing by consulting the works of psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and sociologist Richard Sennett. The framework of a craft is connected to moral realism through an analysis of works by Iris Murdoch and (...)
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  8.  2
    Matthew R. McWhorter (2016). Intrinsic Moral Evils in the Middle Ages: Augustine as a Source of the Theological Doctrine. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):409-423.
    Contemporary historians examining moral theology in the Middle Ages question whether the practice of proscribing certain kinds of human acts as intrinsic moral evils has a legitimate basis in the Christian ethical tradition. John Dedek argues that this proscription does not fully emerge until the work of the fourteenth-century thinker Durandus of St. Pourçain. Dedek’s historical focus, however, is upon theological discussions which consider God’s absolute power and his ability to dispense from or command any human act whatsoever. The focus (...)
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  9.  3
    Oliver O’Donovan (2016). Book Review: John M. Rist, Augustine Deformed: Love, Sin and Freedom in the Western Moral Tradition. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):502-506.
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  10.  2
    Jakub Rajčáni (2016). Good, Truth and Being: The Ethical Thought of Romano Guardini. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):424-436.
    In this article, I present one view of Guardini’s ethics, to which he dedicated his late academic life. Christian ethics for Guardini is only a natural consequence of the whole Christian existence and thus unique. Therefore, it is fundamentally a christocentric ethics but it affirms also the being of man as creature and hence realistic. It is indeed based on the nature of man, but not natural in the biological sense. I focus on the interpretation of the good that is (...)
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  11.  5
    R. Rheeder (2016). Protected by Substitute Consent as a Human Right: A Reformed Perspective. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):437-460.
    In 2005, the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization was accepted unanimously by the world community, consisting of 191 member nations, which means that the declaration is currently the first and only bioethical text to which the entire world has committed itself. It must be borne in mind, though, that this document, particularly Article 7 of the UDBHR, is not of religious origin and must therefore be evaluated from a Christian (...)
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  12.  5
    Lydia Schumacher (2016). Divine Command Theory in Early Franciscan Thought: A Response to the Autonomy Objection. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):461-476.
    In recent years, many scholars have bemoaned the gradual demise of traditional virtue ethics, and its eventual replacement in the later Middle Ages by divine command theory. Where virtue ethics nurtures a capacity for spontaneous moral judgement, this theory turns on adherence to ordained duties and laws. Thus, virtue ethicists among others have tended to object to the theory on the grounds that it undermines the role of the moral agent in moral adjudication. In this article, by contrast, I will (...)
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  13.  2
    Nicholas Townsend (2016). Book Review: David Clark, The Kingdom at Work Project: A Communal Approach to Mission in the Workplace. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):496-498.
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  14.  2
    Samuel Tranter (2016). Book Review: Romanus Cessario OP, Theology and Sanctity, Ed. Cajetan Cuddy OP. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):492-496.
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  15.  5
    Shawn Aghajan (2016). Book Review: Stan Goff, Borderline: Reflections on War, Sex, and Church. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):350-353.
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  16.  2
    Sarah Bachelard (2016). Book Review: Annette M. Glaw, with Foreword by Graham McFarlane, The Holy Spirit and Christian Ethics in the Theology of Klaus Bockmuehl. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):348-350.
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  17.  5
    Michael Banner (2016). Scripts for Modern Dying: The Death Before Death We Have Invented, the Death Before Death We Fear and Some Take Too Literally, and the Death Before Death Christians Believe In. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):249-255.
    Modern scripts for dying in hospice or by euthanasia are inapplicable to the dwindling of long old age, often experienced as social ‘death before death’. The article critiques the rhetoric of ‘death before death’ used of Alzheimer’s patients, and draws attention to an alternative valuation of death of self in the Christian tradition.
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  18.  3
    Jeffrey P. Bishop (2016). Arts of Dying and the Statecraft of Killing. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):261-268.
    Those supporting laws permitting assisted suicide seem to enact a thin morality, one that permits people who desire AS to get it in the terminal stages of an illness, and that provide safeguards both for those who desire AS and do not desire it. This article explores the way in which all AS legislation subtly frames the question of AS such that AS becomes the clearest option; ensconcing AS in law also gives a moral legitimacy to suicide. Thus, the morality (...)
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  19.  3
    Ian Clausen (2016). Book Review: Larry Siedentop, Inventing the Individual: The Origins of Western Liberalism. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):362-364.
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  20.  2
    Sarah Coakley (2016). Introductory Remarks: The Theology and Ethics of Contemporary Dying. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):245-248.
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  21.  12
    N. Deng (2016). Response to Jeffrey Bishop. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):269-271.
    I respond to Jeffrey Bishop’s article ‘Arts of Dying and the Statecraft of Killing’, in this issue, and in particular to his remarks in support of the claim that assisted death should not be legalised.
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  22.  4
    William Matthew Diem (2016). Book Review: Stephen J. Jensen, Knowing the Natural Law: From Precepts and Inclinations to Deriving Oughts. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):356-359.
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  23.  5
    Sean Doherty (2016). Book Review: Wesley Hill, Spiritual Friendship: Finding Love in the Church as a Celibate Gay Christian. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):353-356.
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  24.  3
    David Elliot (2016). The Theological Virtue of Hope and the Art of Dying. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):301-307.
    This article discusses the nature of and challenges to the theological virtue of hope in the Ars moriendi or ‘art of dying’. It proposes a renewed ascesis of hope whose shared eschatological vision and set of practices help sustain from despair and prepare Christians for a hopeful and ‘good death’.
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  25.  2
    Stephen Goundrey-Smith (2016). Book Review: Celia Deane-Drummond, The Wisdom of the Liminal: Evolution and Other Animals in Human Becoming. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):344-347.
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  26.  2
    Elaine Graham (2016). Book Review: Brian Brock , Captive to Christ, Open to the World: On Doing Christian Ethics in Public. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):342-347.
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  27.  5
    Harriet Harris (2016). Can I Be Judged If I Don’T Remember My Sins? Questioning What Is Significant About Life After Death. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):315-322.
    We are preoccupied with memory and psychological continuity in what it would mean to survive one’s death, and so are challenged when our memories fade. If we test the philosophical focus on continuity with theological expectations of transformation, we can look for what emerges, rather than what is lost, even in the most memory-ravaging conditions.
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  28.  2
    Nicholas M. Healy (2016). Book Review: Oliver O’Donovan, Finding and Seeking: Ethics as Theology, Volume 2. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):359-362.
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  29.  6
    Richard Holton (2016). Memory, Persons and Dementia. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):256-260.
    Memory is a complex phenomenon, so the loss of memory that occurs in dementia is equally complex. Accounts that deny personhood to dementia sufferers typically fail to accommodate that complexity.
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  30.  3
    David Albert Jones (2016). Apostles of Suicide: Theological Precedent for Christian Support of ‘Assisted Dying’. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):331-338.
    This article examines the claim of Paul Badham that there is theological precedent for ‘a Christian case for assisted dying’. The writings of Rev. William Inge and Joseph Fletcher do indeed advocate forms of assisted dying. However, this precedent is deeply problematic for its ugly attitude towards people with disabilities.
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  31.  3
    Allan Kellehear (2016). The Nature of Contemporary Dying: Obsessions, Distortions, Challenges. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):272-278.
    This article makes critical observations about the popular examination of dying and its care, identifies the key challenges to modern dying, and argues for a public health approach to end-of-life care. Only by adopting a global and non-clinical perspective on the human experience of dying can we address people’s concerns where these arise—in their own homes and workplaces—and to offer alternatives to the more radical choices offered by modern medicine.
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  32.  4
    Carlo Leget (2016). A New Art of Dying as a Cultural Challenge. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):279-285.
    In North Atlantic culture dying is mostly seen as a personal event. The societal dimension of dying and the impact of the cultural horizon are often overlooked. In this contribution a revised version of a medieval Ars moriendi model is used as a lens to perceive the one-sidedness of North Atlantic culture.
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  33.  2
    M. Therese Lysaught (2016). Book Review: Michael Banner, The Ethics of Everyday Life: Moral Theology, Social Anthropology, and the Imagination of the Human. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):339-342.
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  34.  2
    M. Therese Lysaught (2016). Geographies and Accompaniment: Toward an Ecclesial Re-Ordering of the Art of Dying. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):286-293.
    This article identifies three geographical shifts that have altered the relative social, spatial and temporal locations of dying, church and health care, and axiology causally contributing to our culture’s deformed dying processes. It proposes an alternative script for a new art of dying drawing upon the early church’s practice of the order of widows.
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  35.  3
    Susan Parsons (2016). The Strange Work of Dying. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):308-314.
    This article examines the strange and special character of the work of dying manifest in Christian faith. As a discipline of thinking, ethics arises in response to the transience of life as a way of securing the future, both lending its support to technological interventions and at the same time prompting a new kind of question concerning ‘for what’ something should be done. Christian faith arising from the death and resurrection of the Son of God lives from out of another (...)
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  36.  4
    Ben Quash (2016). ‘If We Be Dead with Christ’ 1 : Christian Visualisations of Death. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):323-330.
    Sixteenth-century Florentines have left us a visual legacy showing them capable of imagining even the executions of criminals as redemptive deaths, with artistic representations of Christ’s own death and the martyrdoms of saints serving such interpretations. This article will look in detail at one such case, before asking whether there might be analogies to this construction of executions as ‘good deaths’ where other, less obviously dramatic kinds of dying are concerned. The comfort that Christian art about dying can give to (...)
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  37.  2
    John Sherrington (2016). The Journey of Accompaniment. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):294-300.
    This article explores the spiritual and pastoral dimensions of accompanying people who are living with dementia. It is estimated that 40 per cent of people living with dementia will experience ‘prolonged dwindling’. The article develops the understanding of the face-to-face attentive presence of one person ministering to another and supporting the sick person in a breadth of life experience. It argues that insight from the thought of Jean Vanier and the community of L’Arche can be used to reflect on care (...)
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  38.  3
    Samuel Tranter (2016). Book Review: John E. Thiel, Icons of Hope: The ‘Last Things’ in Catholic Imagination. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (3):365-367.
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  39.  3
    Stephen C. Barton (2016). Book Review: Reinhard Feldmeier, Power, Service, Humility: A New Testament Ethic. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):230-233.
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  40.  5
    Andrew Bradstock (2016). Book Review: Malcolm Brown , Anglican Social Theology: Renewing the Vision Today. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):226-228.
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  41.  6
    Jonathan Chaplin (2016). Towards a Monotheistic Democratic Constitutionalism? Convergent Themes in Oliver O’Donovan, Sajjad Rizvi and Paul Heck. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):169-176.
    This article responds to the papers by O’Donovan, Rizvi and Heck by identifying four convergent themes emerging from their accounts of Christian and Islamic political thought: the denial of salvific efficacy to the state; the claim that political authority is legitimated and limited by law; the attribution of a normative purpose to the state; and the ascription of a positive role for the people in the legitimation and scrutiny of political authority. The article poses the question whether this amounts to (...)
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  42.  3
    David Clough (2016). Book Review: Michael J. Gilmour, with a Foreword by Laura Hobgood-Oster, Eden’s Other Residents: The Bible and Animals. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):233-236.
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  43.  3
    Sarah Coakley (2016). Introductory Remarks. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):129-130.
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  44.  6
    Anver M. Emon (2016). Beyond the Protestantism of Political Theology: Thinking the Politics of Theological Voluntarism. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):190-203.
    In an attempt to think through the Islamic alongside the Christian, this article draws upon the political theology of Carl Schmitt to reflect on the salience of sovereignty. But in doing so, the article re-reads Schmitt’s political theology for its Protestant voluntarism, and adopts a more robust theological voluntarism as a vehicle for reflecting on political thought across both Christian and Islamic history. Moreover, this approach to political theology makes possible reflections on how political theology, whether in Christian or Islamic (...)
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  45.  6
    Mohammad Fadel (2016). Concluding Comments and Continuing Conversations. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):221-223.
    These conversations between Muslim and Christian scholars produced a lively and informative introduction to the histories of Islamic and Christian theo-political thought. Much was learned over the course of meetings for this project, but future conversations, in order to better appreciate the breadth of theo-political thought in both traditions, will need to expand to include Muslim and Christian discursive traditions beyond the canonical authors explored thus far. Continued conversations should include contemporary expressions of theo-political thought in the Christian and Muslim (...)
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  46.  3
    Philip Goodchild (2016). Book Review: Peter Selby, An Idol Unmasked: A Faith Perspective on Money. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):239-241.
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  47.  7
    Paul L. Heck (2016). Māwardī and Augustine on Governance: How to Restrain the Restrainer? Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):158-168.
    According to the classical Muslim scholar Māwardī, rule is to bring about just order in society in accordance with God’s intentions. The state thus has a role in bringing about divine purposes, and yet Māwardī recognizes the flawed condition of humanity, the ruler included, making it vital that rule be based not solely on the divinely endowed agency of the ruler but more precisely on a set of rules meant to purge the soul of disordered inclinations. In that sense, there (...)
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  48.  7
    Joshua Hordern & Afifi al-Akiti (2016). New Conversations in Islamic and Christian Political Thought. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):131-134.
    The focus of this project, New Conversations in Islamic and Christian Political Thought, concerns the ‘pre-modern’ or ‘long’ traditions of political thought in Islam and Christianity. The renaissance in Christian political thought since World War II has not yet witnessed a sustained engagement with Islamic political thought. Meanwhile, the interface of religion and political life has increasingly become a major focus of academic and public discourse. By exploring the varied traditions of Islam and Christianity, this project seeks to retrieve and (...)
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  49.  7
    Joan Lockwood O’Donovan (2016). Fruitful Areas of Further Inquiry. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):218-220.
    Building on the papers and discussions in this project, my concluding comments indicate fruitful lines of further inquiry into the common and distinctive features of the Christian and Islamic political inheritances and their contemporary appropriation in the two communities. Topics for further exploration include: the hermeneutic approaches to diversity within the authoritative traditions of Christianity and Islam; the extent and nature of the service rendered by political rule to the natural and soteriological goods of moral community; the theological/anthropological underpinnings of (...)
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  50.  7
    Robin W. Lovin (2016). Authority, Legitimacy and Sovereignty: Religion and Politics in the Roman Empire Before Constantine. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):177-189.
    This essay traces Christian thinking about sacred and secular authority during the early centuries of the Roman Empire. Christian martyrdom, interpreted by apologists such as Tertullian, established a place for Christianity in Roman society and gave it authority against imperial power. From this confrontation there emerged a differentiation of religious and civil authority that provided a starting point for later constitutional ideas of separate and balanced powers and distinctions between state and civil society. A comparative perspective reminds us, however, that (...)
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  51.  3
    Jennifer Moberly (2016). Book Review: Stephen J. Plant, Taking Stock of Bonhoeffer: Studies in Biblical Interpretation and Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):236-238.
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  52.  6
    Oliver O’Donovan (2016). Representation. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):135-145.
    Representation is an essential element of political authority, together with power and judgment, the latest to be acknowledged in the Christian West, coming to recognition in the Middle Ages with the expectation of a plurality of national identities. Its initial points of reference were theological, to Israel and to the dual office of Christ as priest and king, but in modern developments it has been understood especially in terms of legal forms. Government represents an existing political identity, bound up with (...)
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  53.  5
    Sajjad Rizvi (2016). Authority, Governance, Legitimacy, Representation: Some Thoughts From the Muslim Margins. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):146-157.
    The study of political theology has never been a neutral exercise in excavating the theoretical origins of sovereignty. The political contexts in which questions arise are instructive. In this paper, I argue that the very language of representation and legitimacy articulated for Muslims in the contemporary world may occlude the political challenges that obviate their possibility. Biopolitics, the construction of tradition, the possibility of a ‘philosophical religion’ and the challenge of rationality, and the incompleteness of the critique of political theology (...)
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  54.  6
    Sajjad Rizvi (2016). Authority in Absence? Shi‘I Politics of Salvation From the Classical Period to Modern Republicanism. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):204-212.
    Shi‘i Islam is often considered to be political per se because of its emergence historically as a movement with a strong position on authority and legitimacy in governance. This piece demonstrates how the politics of salvation in the tradition tie together one’s loyalty to the divine person of the Imam to one’s final destination, and how that relationship is complicated in the physical absence of the Imam. Such a politics guards against a sacralisation of everyday politics and recognises that sanctity (...)
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  55.  4
    Veronica Roberts (2016). Book Review: Michael J. S. Bruno, Political Augustinianism: Modern Interpretations of Augustine’s Political Thought. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):228-230.
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  56.  2
    Joshua R. Sweeden (2016). Book Review: Rustin E. Brian, Covering Up Luther: How Barth’s Christology Challenged the Deus Absconditus That Haunts Modernity. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):224-226.
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  57.  11
    Rowan Williams (2016). Authority Deferred: A Christian Comment. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):213-217.
    This essay responds to Sajjad Rizvi’s analysis of Shi‘a political theology in terms of the risks of over-emphasising the achieved clarity of a religious/political ethic in society. It notes the comparable reserve in Christian political thought, especially in the Augustinian tradition, in respect of a single sacral authority in society, and briefly discusses the various ways in which this has been articulated in mediaeval and modern contexts.
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  58.  7
    Mark Coffey (2016). Book Review: Nicholas M. Healy, Hauerwas: A Critical Introduction. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):106-110.
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  59.  7
    Andrew Goddard (2016). Book Review: Wesley Vander Lugt, Living Theodrama: Reimagining Theological Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):121-124.
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  60.  7
    R. Haflidson (2016). Outward, Inward, Upward: Why Three Goods of Marriage for Augustine? Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):51-68.
    In this article I argue that Augustine’s three marital goods of procreation, fidelity and sacrament correspond to the familiar Augustinian pattern of ascent as the self turns from outward to inward and then upward. I develop this reading as an alternative to the suggestion that three goods each reflect one of the Triune persons and through critical engagement with recent interpreters of Augustine’s theology of marriage.
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  61.  10
    Christopher J. Insole (2016). Kant on Christianity, Religion and Politics: Three Hopes, Three Limits. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):14-33.
    This article makes two key claims in succession. First of all, Kant’s own religious hope is significantly and studiedly distanced from the traditions of Christianity that he would have received, in ways that have not yet been fully, or widely, appreciated. Kant makes an ideal moral community the object of our religious hopes, and not the transcendent God of the tradition. Secondly, Kant nonetheless has a notion of transcendence at play, but in a strikingly different key to traditional Christianity. Both (...)
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  62.  8
    Matthew R. Jantzen (2016). Book Review: Hans S. Reinders, Disability, Providence, and Ethics: Bridging Gaps, Transforming Lives. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):110-113.
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  63.  19
    David McIlroy (2016). How Is the Rule of Law a Limit on Power? Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):34-50.
    A commitment to the rule of law is a commitment to the governance of a society through the use of general or generalisable rules which are binding on both the subjects and the rulers. By giving due notice of the rules and of any changes to them, those who are subject to the law are protected from violence and enabled to act as agents. This is the essential contribution the rule of law makes to important human goods including freedom. Such (...)
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  64.  5
    Travis Ryan Pickell (2016). Book Review: Allan Aubrey Boesak, Dare We Speak of Hope? Searching for a Language of Life in Faith and Politics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):99-102.
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  65.  6
    Esther Reed (2016). Book Review: Rebecca Todd Peters, Solidarity Ethics: Transformation in a Globalized World. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):119-121.
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  66.  8
    Christopher C. Roberts (2016). Book Review: Robert Song, Covenant and Calling: Towards a Theology of Same-Sex Relationships. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):115-119.
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  67.  7
    David S. Robinson (2016). Book Review: Guido De Graaff, Politics in Friendship: A Theological Account. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):102-106.
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  68.  4
    William Schweiker (2016). The Ethical Limits of Power: On the Perichoresis of Power. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):3-13.
    This article explores the interrelations among religious, moral and political power in an analogy to the Christian concept of ‘perichoresis’ of the Trinity. Starting with beliefs about power, the endoxa, the article explores, first, moments in Western thought to show how power has been grounded in God or gods and in the vitalities of nature. In each case, ultimately speaking, ‘might makes right’. Within this history the article also charts the ‘axial breakthrough’ in Christianity that places ‘ethical’ limits on religious (...)
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  69.  5
    Tarah Van De Wiele (2016). What Rights Get Wrong About Justice for Orphans: An Old Testament Challenge to a Modern Ideology. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):69-83.
    This article challenges Nicholas Wolterstorff’s rights-based reading of Old Testament orphans by arguing that the prophetic demand for their cause not only assumes a right-order ethos championed in the Torah, but in doing so exposes the shortcomings in how justice is defined for orphaned children within current rights ideology, whether theistic or not. I present the orphan’s historical trajectory towards becoming socially vulnerable as the final stage in the transition from the kinship-redeemer justice of Israelite village clans to the chesed (...)
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  70.  6
    M. Westerholm (2016). On the Christological Determination of Augustines Theology of Love. Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):84-98.
    This article seeks to show that recent deployments of Augustine’s theology of love as an alternative to, or resource within, contemporary liberalism are typified by attempts to use Christologically-grounded reconsiderations of the relation between the Creator and the creature to respond to the suggestion that Augustine cannot accommodate love of creaturely goods. It then argues that these attempts rest on abstract understandings of divine presence that issue from a breakdown of distinctions between Christology, ecclesiology and the theology of creation. It (...)
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  71.  7
    Nigel Zimmermann (2016). Book Review: Andrew Shepherd, The Gift of the Other: Levinas, Derrida, and a Theology of Hospitality. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (1):113-115.
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