Year:

  1.  0
    Victor Lee Austin (2015). Book Review: Lincoln Harvey, A Brief Theology of Sport. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):369-371.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  1
    Hugh Beach (2015). Can a Soldier Love His Enemy? Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):280-286.
    This article addresses the issue of love in war from the position of an officer actively engaged in the training of officers in the British army over many years. It describes the ethos which informs this training and proposes that a better analogy is with the Golden Rule.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  0
    Nigel Biggar (2015). In Response. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):328-342.
    The author of In Defence of War responds to each commentator in turn, discussing the following issues, among others: the Christian specification of just war, its punitive form, the virtue of callousness, love for the enemy, the intention to kill, proportionality, empire, international law, human fatedness, and the First World War.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  0
    Cécile Fabre (2015). Nigel Biggar’s Just War: Reflections on Jus Ad Bellum. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):292-297.
    This paper raises some questions about Biggar’s accounts of the just cause and proportionality criteria for a just war. With respect to just cause, it argues that Biggar is committed to a broader range of justifications for war than one might think. Regarding proportionality, it claims that his account thereof invites reflection on the morality of conscription, and, more important still, given the book’s main aim—to refute Christian pacifism—in fact should lead him to embrace pacifism.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  0
    Therese Feiler (2015). From Dialectics to Theo-Logic: The Ethics of War From Paul Ramsey to Oliver O’Donovan. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):343-359.
    This article studies the fundamental shift between Paul Ramsey’s and Oliver O’Donovan’s ethics of war and so reintroduces Hegel into the debate on political ethics. The topic is approached through the notion of divine-human and political mediation, whereby Hegel’s early movement from Christology to dialectics provides the analytical framework. The article first studies the theo-logic of Paul Ramsey’s early agapist notions of war up to his transformist period. It then traces how O’Donovan fundamentally transforms Ramsey’s dialectical framework within that of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  1
    Robin Gill (2015). Book Review: Neil Messer, Flourishing: Health, Disease, and Bioethics in Theological Perspective. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):375-377.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  0
    James Turner Johnson (2015). Harsh Love’ and Forgiveness. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):266-272.
    While Biggar in chapter 2 of his In Defence of War cites Augustine in support of an argument for forgiveness and reconciliation, this paper argues through a close look at Augustine’s Letters 95 and 139 and Book I of his On Christian Doctrine that Augustine’s view of how the Donatists should be treated focused on their punishment, not on reconciliation in the sense Biggar describes.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  0
    John Kelsay (2015). Biggar’s Critique of Christian Pacifism, Extended. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):259-265.
    In this essay, I take up the critique of Christian pacifism offered in Nigel Biggar’s In Defence of War. 1 Focusing on the New Testament, Biggar argues that the evidence does not suggest a requirement of pacifism for Christians. This seems correct, but I argue that Biggar’s critique should be extended through an engagement with the Old Testament and other sources that inform Christian practical reason.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  0
    Claus Kreß (2015). Revitalised Early Christian Just War Thinking and International Law: Some Observations on Nigel Biggar’s In Defence of War. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):305-315.
    In light of the well-established international legal principle of non-use of force in international relations, Nigel Biggar’s In Defence of War may give rise to concern in the academy of international lawyers. But the gap between the book’s conclusions and the current international law on the use of force turns out to be less significant upon closer inspection than at first sight. This essay reviews Biggar’s concept of ‘just war as punishment’, his view on the legal status of the ‘unjust (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  0
    Cian O’Driscoll (2015). The Heart of the Matter? The Callousness of Just War. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):273-279.
    Nigel Biggar’s In Defence of War delivers a stout defence of just war thinking. It refuses to shy away from the tough questions raised by modern warfare. Instead, it submits that thinking clearly about these questions may require just war scholars to demonstrate a toughness to match, by callousing themselves to the human suffering their vocation forces them to confront. This article seeks to tease out Biggar’s understanding of callousness, challenging the reader to consider what is lost and enabled by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  1
    Esther D. Reed (2015). In Defence of the Laws of War. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):298-304.
    This essay warns that Nigel Biggar’s permissive reading of the classic, theological just war tradition is problematic especially when combined with his highly contextual approach to the United Nations Charter and laws of war. Two points are made: When compared to Augustine’s grappling with the disordered loves of the Roman empire—including ‘foreign iniquity’ as an excuse for military action, the animus dominandi, and wars of a kind that generate more war—In Defence of War lacks a political realism robust enough to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  0
    John Rist (2015). Book Review: Jesse Couenhoven, Stricken by Sin, Cured by Christ: Agency, Necessity, and Culpability in Augustinian Theology and Eric L. Jenkins, Free to Say No? Free Will and Augustine’s Evolving Doctrines of Grace and Election. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):364-369.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  0
    Paul Schulte (2015). Probing the Biggar Line: Strong Points and Vulnerabilities of an Anglican Defence of Britain’s Latest Belligerent Century and of Wider Just War Theoretical Positions. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):316-327.
    Biggar’s excellent book allows examination of the adequacy of Christian just war theory over key events of the last century’s British military and interventionary history. I attempt infiltration of key positions behind a creeping barrage, following the contours of Biggar’s arguments, finally firing corrosive Greek fire into the deep Latinate redoubts of Fortresses Augustine and Aquinas. I shall explain why the audit of Biggar’s ambitious defensive system shows a very mixed balance sheet for just war theory.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  0
    Thomas W. Simpson (2015). Did Marine A Do Wrong? On Biggar’s Lethal Intentions. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):287-291.
    On patrol in Afghanistan, Sgt Blackman—referred to as ‘Marine A’ at the subsequent trial—pulled a wounded Taliban fighter out of view and shot him at close range. He was subsequently convicted for murder. I argue that, given premises endorsed in In Defence of War, Nigel Biggar is committed to the justifiability of that battlefield killing.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  0
    Christoph Stumpf (2015). Book Review: Esther D. Reed, Theology for International Law. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):377-380.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  0
    Nicholas Townsend (2015). Book Review: Cathleen Kaveny, Law’s Virtues: Fostering Autonomy and Solidarity in American Society. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):371-375.
  17.  0
    Bernd Wannenwetsch (2015). Book Review: Joel D. Biermann, A Case for Character: Towards a Lutheran Virtue Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):360-364.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    Christina Aus der Au (2015). Being Christian in the World: The Tertius Usus Legis as the Starting Point of a Reformed Ethic. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):132-141.
    In Protestant theology, the law of the Old Testament still has two functions for Christians: as God’s containment of the chaos in the form of political order and as confronting self-righteous humans in their inability to comply and pointing them to the necessity of grace. For Reformed Protestants however, there is a third use of the law, directed to the renatus, the ‘born again’ Christian, to the iustus and not to the peccator in order for him to keep growing in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  0
    John Bowlin (2015). Notes on Natural Law and Covenant. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):142-149.
    This essay is an intervention into the recent discussion among Protestant moral theologians about the natural law. It takes up two tasks. First, it draws out some of the connections that obtain between the natural law and the divine work of creation and providence as they bear on human agency. Then, second, it shows how this connection between natural law and divine work can be usefully described in terms of covenant. What emerges in bare outline is the covenantal logic of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  0
    Elizabeth Cochran (2015). The Moral Significance of Religious Affections: A Reformed Perspective on Emotions and Moral Formation. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):150-162.
    Drawing on the work of Jonathan Edwards, this essay explores two dimensions of Reformed thought central to considering the emotions’ moral significance. First, Reformed theology’s singular understanding of virtue and holiness as love to God and neighbor gives rise to a distinctive account of the emotions’ place in the moral life. Certain emotions are to be embraced insofar as they have the capacity to be sanctified and thereby made compatible with growth in love to God. Second, Reformed theology historically links (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  0
    Stanley Hauerwas, Daniel Umbel, Anthony Siegrist, Mark Nation & Jennifer Moberly (2015). Book Review: Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony G. Siegrist and Daniel P. Umbel, with Foreword by Stanley Hauerwas, Bonhoeffer the Assassin? Challenging the Myth, Recovering His Call to Peacemaking. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):248-251.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  0
    Christopher Kaczor, Hans Joas, David Gushee & Darlene Weaver (2015). Human Worth: Intrinsic, Divinely Conferred, or Contingent Value Commitment? A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):224-235.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  0
    Margaret Kohl, Jürgen Moltmann & David Clough (2015). Book Review: Jürgen Moltmann, Ethics of Hope. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):243-245.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  0
    Pierre-Yves Materne & H. StJ Broadbent (2015). Book Review: Pierre-Yves Materne, La condition de disciple: Ethique et politique chez J.B. Metz et S. Hauerwas. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):236-240.
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  0
    Neil Messer (2015). Determinism, Freedom and Sin: Reformed Theological Resources for a Conversation with Neuroscience and Philosophy. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):163-174.
    This paper engages with one debate in the emerging field of neuroethics. It is sometimes claimed on the strength of neuroscientific research that our actions are causally determined and therefore not truly free, or more modestly that brain structures or processes constrain some choices and actions, raising questions about our moral responsibility for them. I argue that a Reformed account of providence, sin and grace offers an account of causation able to resist hard determinism, reframes concepts of freedom and responsibility, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  1
    Jennifer Moberly & Joel Biermann (2015). Book Review: Jennifer Moberly, The Virtue of Bonhoeffer’s Ethics: A Study of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Ethics in Relation to Virtue Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):240-242.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  0
    Carys Moseley & Jeremy Worthen (2015). Book Review: Carys Moseley, Nationhood, Providence, and Witness: Israel in Protestant Theology and Social Theory. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):245-247.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  0
    Helen Oppenheimer & Gilbert Meilaender (2015). Book Review: Helen Oppenheimer, Christian Faith for Handing On. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):251-253.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  0
    Scott Prather & David Haddorff (2015). Book Review: Scott Thomas Prather, Christ, Power and Mammon: Karl Barth and John Howard Yoder in Dialogue. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):253-256.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  0
    Cynthia Rigby (2015). Stepping Into the Madness: On Being Sceptical, Doing Justice, and Hoping Against Hope 1. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):175-186.
    This essay finds room for scepticism in the context of a Reformed understanding of how we come to know, and participate in, the work of God in the world. To disallow scepticism in the face of the impossible things God has promised is to impede the work of bringing God’s Kingdom to earth as it is in heaven. This work is done only when we step into that which is beyond anything we can ask or imagine. I develop this argument (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  0
    Dirk Smit (2015). No Polycarps Among Us’? Questions for Reformed Political Theology Today. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):187-200.
    Offering an overview of challenges and questions, the essay situates contemporary directions and developments in Reformed thought about political ethics by considering whether four well-known slogans from the tradition of Reformed political thought are still meaningful and credible under changed conditions today. The four slogans, integrally related to one another, are the lordship of Christ, the prophetic role of the church, the love for justice, and the importance of calling. The essay draws primarily on recent South African experiences, where the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  0
    Pieter Vos (2015). Calvinists Among the Virtues: Reformed Theological Contributions to Contemporary Virtue Ethics 1. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):201-212.
    Since virtue and the virtues have been important in Reformed theology for most of its history, this essay is devoted to the question of how this tradition may contribute to and interact with contemporary virtue ethics . Reformed concepts of sanctification as open to moral growth, covenant as a narrative context of divine commandments, and unio cum Christo as defining human teleology and virtuousness provide valuable contributions to the development of such an ethics. On the other hand, Reformed conceptions of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  0
    Philip Ziegler (2015). Guest Editorial. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):130-131.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  0
    Philip Ziegler (2015). The Adventitious Origins of the Calvinist Moral Subject. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):213-223.
    This paper argues that Calvin provides an account of the radical unmaking of the human moral subject at the hands of sin and its even more radical remaking at the hands of divine grace. The moral significance of human continuity during this soteriological transit, including such things as reason and will as such, is shown to be overreached by that of what becomes of the human creature in its history at the hands of both sin and God’s grace. Calvin’s treatment (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  2
    N. Adams (2015). Book Review: Christopher J. Insole, Kant and the Creation of Freedom: A Theological Problem. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):114-117.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  1
    J. W. Bailey (2015). Book Review: Elaine Graham, Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Public Theology in a Post-Secular Age. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):110-114.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  3
    J. Barton (2015). Sin in the Psalms. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):49-58.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  2
    S. C. Barton (2015). Be Angry But Do Not Sin' : Sin and the Emotions in the New Testament with Special Reference to Anger. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):21-34.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  0
    T. Feiler (2015). Book Review: Stephen G. Parker and Tom Lawson , God and War: The Church of England and Armed Conflict in the Twentieth Century. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):117-120.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  4
    A. Goddard (2015). Book Review: James V. Brownson, Bible, Gender, Sexuality: Reframing the Church's Debate on Same-Sex Relationships. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):103-110.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  1
    A. Hambler (2015). Book Review: Rex Ahdar and Ian Leigh, Religious Freedom in the Liberal State. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):101-103.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  6
    D. Leal (2015). Book Review: Alexander Pruss, One Body: An Essay in Christian Sexual Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):120-124.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  1
    R. C. Miner (2015). The Difficulties of Mercy: Reading Thomas Aquinas on Misericordia. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):70-85.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  1
    O. O'Donovan (2015). Pride's Progress. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):59-69.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  3
    T. R. Pickell (2015). Book Review: John D. Roth , Constantine Revisited: Leithart, Yoder, and the Constantinian Debate. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):124-127.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  0
    D. S. Robinson (2015). Peccatorum Communio: Intercession in Bonhoeffer's Use of Hegel. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):86-100.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  1
    B. Wannenwetsch (2015). Sin as Forgetting: Negotiating Divine Presence. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):3-20.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  2
    J. Webster (2015). Sins of Speech. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):35-48.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues