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  1. Christina Aus der Au (2015). Being Christian in the World: The Tertius Usus Legis as the Starting Point of a Reformed Ethic. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):132-141.
    In Protestant theology, the law of the Old Testament still has two functions for Christians: as God’s containment of the chaos in the form of political order and as confronting self-righteous humans in their inability to comply and pointing them to the necessity of grace. For Reformed Protestants however, there is a third use of the law, directed to the renatus, the ‘born again’ Christian, to the iustus and not to the peccator in order for him to keep growing in (...)
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  2. John Bowlin (2015). Notes on Natural Law and Covenant. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):142-149.
    This essay is an intervention into the recent discussion among Protestant moral theologians about the natural law. It takes up two tasks. First, it draws out some of the connections that obtain between the natural law and the divine work of creation and providence as they bear on human agency. Then, second, it shows how this connection between natural law and divine work can be usefully described in terms of covenant. What emerges in bare outline is the covenantal logic of (...)
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  3. Elizabeth Cochran (2015). The Moral Significance of Religious Affections: A Reformed Perspective on Emotions and Moral Formation. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):150-162.
    Drawing on the work of Jonathan Edwards, this essay explores two dimensions of Reformed thought central to considering the emotions’ moral significance. First, Reformed theology’s singular understanding of virtue and holiness as love to God and neighbor gives rise to a distinctive account of the emotions’ place in the moral life. Certain emotions are to be embraced insofar as they have the capacity to be sanctified and thereby made compatible with growth in love to God. Second, Reformed theology historically links (...)
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  4. Stanley Hauerwas, Daniel Umbel, Anthony Siegrist, Mark Nation & Jennifer Moberly (2015). Book Review: Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony G. Siegrist and Daniel P. Umbel, with Foreword by Stanley Hauerwas, Bonhoeffer the Assassin? Challenging the Myth, Recovering His Call to Peacemaking. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):248-251.
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  5. Christopher Kaczor, Hans Joas, David Gushee & Darlene Weaver (2015). Human Worth: Intrinsic, Divinely Conferred, or Contingent Value Commitment? A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):224-235.
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  6. Margaret Kohl, Jürgen Moltmann & David Clough (2015). Book Review: Jürgen Moltmann, Ethics of Hope. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):243-245.
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  7. Pierre-Yves Materne & H. StJ Broadbent (2015). Book Review: Pierre-Yves Materne, La condition de disciple: Ethique et politique chez J.B. Metz et S. Hauerwas. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):236-240.
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  8. Neil Messer (2015). Determinism, Freedom and Sin: Reformed Theological Resources for a Conversation with Neuroscience and Philosophy. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):163-174.
    This paper engages with one debate in the emerging field of neuroethics. It is sometimes claimed on the strength of neuroscientific research that our actions are causally determined and therefore not truly free, or more modestly that brain structures or processes constrain some choices and actions, raising questions about our moral responsibility for them. I argue that a Reformed account of providence, sin and grace offers an account of causation able to resist hard determinism, reframes concepts of freedom and responsibility, (...)
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  9. Jennifer Moberly & Joel Biermann (2015). Book Review: Jennifer Moberly, The Virtue of Bonhoeffer’s Ethics: A Study of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Ethics in Relation to Virtue Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):240-242.
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  10. Carys Moseley & Jeremy Worthen (2015). Book Review: Carys Moseley, Nationhood, Providence, and Witness: Israel in Protestant Theology and Social Theory. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):245-247.
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  11. Helen Oppenheimer & Gilbert Meilaender (2015). Book Review: Helen Oppenheimer, Christian Faith for Handing On. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):251-253.
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  12. Scott Prather & David Haddorff (2015). Book Review: Scott Thomas Prather, Christ, Power and Mammon: Karl Barth and John Howard Yoder in Dialogue. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):253-256.
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  13. Cynthia Rigby (2015). Stepping Into the Madness: On Being Sceptical, Doing Justice, and Hoping Against Hope 1. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):175-186.
    This essay finds room for scepticism in the context of a Reformed understanding of how we come to know, and participate in, the work of God in the world. To disallow scepticism in the face of the impossible things God has promised is to impede the work of bringing God’s Kingdom to earth as it is in heaven. This work is done only when we step into that which is beyond anything we can ask or imagine. I develop this argument (...)
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  14. Dirk Smit (2015). No Polycarps Among Us’? Questions for Reformed Political Theology Today. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):187-200.
    Offering an overview of challenges and questions, the essay situates contemporary directions and developments in Reformed thought about political ethics by considering whether four well-known slogans from the tradition of Reformed political thought are still meaningful and credible under changed conditions today. The four slogans, integrally related to one another, are the lordship of Christ, the prophetic role of the church, the love for justice, and the importance of calling. The essay draws primarily on recent South African experiences, where the (...)
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  15. Pieter Vos (2015). Calvinists Among the Virtues: Reformed Theological Contributions to Contemporary Virtue Ethics 1. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):201-212.
    Since virtue and the virtues have been important in Reformed theology for most of its history, this essay is devoted to the question of how this tradition may contribute to and interact with contemporary virtue ethics . Reformed concepts of sanctification as open to moral growth, covenant as a narrative context of divine commandments, and unio cum Christo as defining human teleology and virtuousness provide valuable contributions to the development of such an ethics. On the other hand, Reformed conceptions of (...)
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  16. Philip Ziegler (2015). Guest Editorial. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):130-131.
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  17. Philip Ziegler (2015). The Adventitious Origins of the Calvinist Moral Subject. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (2):213-223.
    This paper argues that Calvin provides an account of the radical unmaking of the human moral subject at the hands of sin and its even more radical remaking at the hands of divine grace. The moral significance of human continuity during this soteriological transit, including such things as reason and will as such, is shown to be overreached by that of what becomes of the human creature in its history at the hands of both sin and God’s grace. Calvin’s treatment (...)
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  18. N. Adams (2015). Book Review: Christopher J. Insole, Kant and the Creation of Freedom: A Theological Problem. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):114-117.
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  19. J. W. Bailey (2015). Book Review: Elaine Graham, Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Public Theology in a Post-Secular Age. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):110-114.
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  20. J. Barton (2015). Sin in the Psalms. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):49-58.
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  21. S. C. Barton (2015). 'Be Angry But Do Not Sin' : Sin and the Emotions in the New Testament with Special Reference to Anger. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):21-34.
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  22. T. Feiler (2015). Book Review: Stephen G. Parker and Tom Lawson , God and War: The Church of England and Armed Conflict in the Twentieth Century. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):117-120.
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  23. A. Goddard (2015). Book Review: James V. Brownson, Bible, Gender, Sexuality: Reframing the Church's Debate on Same-Sex Relationships. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):103-110.
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  24. A. Hambler (2015). Book Review: Rex Ahdar and Ian Leigh, Religious Freedom in the Liberal State. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):101-103.
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  25. D. Leal (2015). Book Review: Alexander Pruss, One Body: An Essay in Christian Sexual Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):120-124.
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  26. R. C. Miner (2015). The Difficulties of Mercy: Reading Thomas Aquinas on Misericordia. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):70-85.
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  27. O. O'Donovan (2015). Pride's Progress. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):59-69.
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  28. T. R. Pickell (2015). Book Review: John D. Roth , Constantine Revisited: Leithart, Yoder, and the Constantinian Debate. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):124-127.
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  29. D. S. Robinson (2015). Peccatorum Communio: Intercession in Bonhoeffer's Use of Hegel. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):86-100.
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  30. B. Wannenwetsch (2015). Sin as Forgetting: Negotiating Divine Presence. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):3-20.
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  31. J. Webster (2015). Sins of Speech. Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (1):35-48.
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