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  1. D. Coli (2014). Gentile and Modernity. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):137-166.
    This essay situates Gentile in the debate over the meaning and value of 'modernity' as interpreted by post-War commentators such as Hannah Arendt, Jürgen Habermas and Leo Strauss. Coli shows how Gentile drew upon his predecessors as he developed his actual idealist conception of the relation between thinking, the thinker and the world. Gentile's response to themulti-faceted problem of modernity combines reactionary and progressive elements: the central threads of western culture, he believes, can and should be retained, though updated, refined (...)
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  2. J. Connelly (2014). Collingwood, Gentile and Italian Neo-Idealism in Britain. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):205-234.
    This essay discusses the reception of Gentile's ideas in Britain before the Second World War, identifying the key figures and events that contributed to his enduring reputation. The central figure in Connelly's account is R.G. Collingwood, whose assessments of Gentile, sometimes enthusiastic, sometimes harshly critical, yet in fact deeply ambiguous, reflect the changing tenor of the debates over Italian neo-idealism in the Anglophone world.
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  3. G. Gentile (2014). The Method of Immanence. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):235-275.
    In this seminal essay, Gentile gives an account of the way in which western philosophy gradually shed the myth of a transcendent reality. 'The Method of Immanence' is an outstanding example of Gentile's writing and one of the central texts in the actual idealist canon. In it Gentile displays boldness , historical erudition and remarkable single-mindedness as he works to set a host of ostensibly very different philosophers in a single tradition culminating in actual idealism.
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  4. G. Gentile (2014). Pure Experience and Historical Reality. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):277-309.
    In this, Gentile's inaugural lecture delivered at the University of Pisa in 1914, he describes his approach to and conception of history. The opening sections of the lecture display a more personal and relaxed, at times effusive side to Gentile's writing as he praises his former teachers, offering readers some insight into his influences and his view of his own philosophical project. In the later sections, he turns to the technical question of how we, as concrete subjects living, thinking and (...)
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  5. G. Gentile (2014). The Moral Problem. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):311-342.
    In this lecture, taken from the Discorsi di religione , Gentile tries to make sense of morality in the absence of a transcendent reality. This lecture is in some respects uncharacteristic of Gentile's work. While the tenets of actual idealism give rise to the question, the answer is elaborated without recourse to the technical apparatus of actual idealism. As a result, the lecture plainly shows us Gentile not, as he was sometimes thought to be, as the expounder of a rigid (...)
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  6. G. Gentile (2014). Basic Concepts of Actualism. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):343-359.
    In this essay, Gentile offers an accessible overview of the tenets of his philosophy. Originally published in German in 1929 and later revised for inclusion in Gentile's Introduzione alla filosofia , the essay also contains replies to some of the main objections levelled at the doctrine, such as that it was solipsistic, incompatible with Christianity and unable tomake sense of sensory or empirical experience. Thus we see how Gentile used the years separating this essay and 'The Method of Immanence' to (...)
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  7. B. Haddock (2014). Introduction. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):1-15.
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  8. B. Haddock (2014). Gentile as Historian of Philosophy: The Method of Immanence in Practice. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):17-43.
    This essay shows how Gentile's 'method of immanence' informed his distinctive approach to the history of philosophy. By reference to Gentile's influential studies of thinkers such as Rosmini, Gioberti and Vico, Haddock shows how a method of internal criticism that he had employed throughout his work on history of philosophy could be distilled as an appropriate method for philosophy itself. Gentile always denied that a disciplined approach to philosophy could be attained without serious engagement with the history of philosophy. In (...)
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  9. A. G. Pesce (2014). The Integral Philosophical Experience of Actualism. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):45-72.
    This essay explores the central role that Gentile assigns to concrete thinking. Through a combination of historical and theoretical interpretation, Pesce argues that Gentile's radical ideas had their roots in great cultural shifts of the nineteenth century, and in particular in the widespread dissatisfaction with the reduced conception of the person that had arisen through the scientific advances of that period. Gentile's stress on the richness of concrete thinking makes actualism an especially pertinent alternative to the empiricism and positivism that (...)
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  10. R. Peters (2014). The Actuality of Gentile's Philosophy of History. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):167-203.
    This essay reconstructs Gentile's conception of history as the product of the eternal act of thinking. Peters charts the development of this distinctive position, presenting it as the product of a sustained attempt to unite past and present, fact and value, thought and action within a single theory. He argues that, despite a number of weaknesses that Gentile neglected to consider and the regrettable, dubious extremes to which he extended his theory in the Fascist period, it deserves greater attention from (...)
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  11. A. Vincent (2014). Gentile, Education and Mind. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):105-136.
    This essay explains and criticizes Gentile's attempts to connect his metaphysical theories with his ideas about education, and especially the relationship between education and nationalism. It begins with a critical examination of the distinguishing features of the view Gentile specifies in Theory of Mind as Pure Act. Vincent then considers Gentile's account of how this theory, for which mind is an act of perpetual self-creation, leads to a conception of education with an explicitly nationalist bent. His attempts to connect these (...)
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  12. J. Wakefield (2014). Giovanni Gentile as Moral Philosopher. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):73-103.
    This essay assesses Gentile's contributions to practical philosophy, showing how a distinctive but idiosyncraticmoral theory emerges over the course of his systematic works. Wakefield argues that Gentile's thoroughgoing anti-realism does not, as some critics have thought, leave him unable to distinguish reasonable from unreasonable arguments or good from bad reasons for action. While actual idealism veers too close to implausible relativism to have much use as an all-purpose philosophical outlook, argues Wakefield, it retains real power as a practical theory.
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