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  1. Sorin Baiasu (2013). Caird on Kant's Idealism: Traditionalist or Revolutionary? Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 19 (1):19-45.
    The traditionalist interpretation of Kant's idealism reads his Critical philosophy as a version of traditional idealism, à la Berkeley. By contrast, a revolutionary account of Kant will assert the threefold distinction between states of mind, external objects of the world and things in themselves, and will reject the attempt to reduce external objects to states of mind. In this paper, I argue that, while Caird's interpretation is clearly not traditionalist, nor is it obviously revolutionary: he is critical of Kant's threefold (...)
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  2. Sorin Baiasu (2013). Introduction: Kant and the British Idealists. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 19 (1):1-18.
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  3. Katie Harrington (2013). Kant and Collingwood on the Mind-Body Problem. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 19 (1):95-111.
    In this paper, I explore both Kant's and Collingwood's accounts of themind-body problem. I discuss how both philosophers think that this problem arises and how it can be resolved. I start by discussing the similarities between the attempts of the two philosophers at solving philosophical problems through analysing the conceptual structures that make experience possible. I then turn to the differences between the views of the two philosophers, paying particular attention to Kant's claims that a combination of a natural (so-called (...)
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  4. Daniel Herbert (2013). Kant, Bradley and The Conditionality of Human Knowledge. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 19 (1):47-74.
    The present paper makes three contentions with regard to the respective Kantian and Bradleyian accounts of the intrinsically problematic status of our epistemic predicament. First, it is in consequence of their common adherence to a view of the human intellect as both inherently qualified by its cognitive dependence upon the conditional phenomena of sensible experience and rationally committed to the pursuit of knowledge of the unconditional, that Kant and Bradley regard rational cognition as accountable to a standard which it cannot (...)
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  5. Jessica Leech & Emily Thomas (2013). Baking with Kant and Bradley. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 19 (1):75-94.
    This paper compares the views of Kant and F.H. Bradley on the nature of judgment or experience. We argue that, while there are many differences between their idealist systems, Kant and Bradley agree on a basic issue: there is a sense in which a whole judgment or experience is prior to its parts. Through the extended metaphor of cake baking, we show that for Kant there is an important sense in which a judgment --in spite of resulting from the synthesis (...)
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  6. Ralph Norman (2013). The Christologies of Kant and the British Idealists: Ethical and Ontological Theories of Kenosis. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 19 (1):113-137.
    In Religion Within the Boundaries of Mere Reason (6: 61), Kant provided an ethical interpretation of kenosis, the 'self-emptying' of Christ described by St Paul in Philippians 2: 6-8. This type of interpretation is distinct to Hegelian interpretations of Christ's kenosis, which read the 'self-emptying' in ontological terms. In this essay, I explore how the British Idealists received both interpretations of the doctrine, and constructed a range of Christologies of both types. Types of kenosis in the work of Thomas Hill (...)
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