13 found

Year:

  1.  2
    Ioannis D. Evrigenis (2016). Rousseau and Hobbes: Nature, Free Will, and the Passions_, _written by Robin Douglass. Hobbes Studies 29 (2):210-214.
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  2.  3
    James J. Hamilton (2016). Hobbes on Felicity. Hobbes Studies 29 (2):129-147.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 129 - 147 Thomas Hobbes’s concept of felicity is a re-imagining of the Hellenistic concept of _eudaimonia_, which is based on the doctrine that people by nature are happy with little. His concept is based instead on an alternative view, that people by nature are never satisfied and it directly challenges the Aristotelian and Hellenistic concepts of _eudaimonia_. I also will suggest that Hobbes developed it from ideas he found in Aristotle’s _Rhetoric_ as (...)
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  3.  1
    Maximilian Jaede (2016). Emergencies and Politics: A Sober Hobbesian Approach_, _written by Tom Sorell. Hobbes Studies 29 (2):221-225.
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  4.  4
    Elliott Karstadt (2016). The Place of Interests in Hobbes’s Civil Science. Hobbes Studies 29 (2):105-128.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 105 - 128 Many scholars argue that Hobbes’s political ideas do not significantly develop between _The Elements of Law_ and _Leviathan_. This article seeks to challenge that assumption by studying the way in which Hobbes’s deployment of the vocabulary of ‘interest’ develops over the course of the 1640s. The article begins by showing that the vocabulary is newly important in _Leviathan_, before attempting a ‘Hobbesian definition’ of what is meant by the term. We (...)
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  5.  4
    S. A. Lloyd (2016). Authorization and Moral Responsibility in the Philosophy of Hobbes. Hobbes Studies 29 (2):169-188.
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  6.  1
    Marcus Schultz-Bergin (2016). The Authority Dilemma. Hobbes Studies 29 (2):148-167.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 148 - 167 Thomas Hobbes’s attempt to resolve the problem of commanded blasphemy in _Leviathan_ results in a dilemma for his theory. According to what I call the _Authority Dilemma_, Hobbes is simultaneously committed to subjects being the authors of all that the sovereign does and commands as well as to the sovereign being the sole author of commanded blasphemy, meaning the subjects are _not_ the authors of that command. I review a variety (...)
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  7.  2
    Johann Sommerville (2016). De L’Homme. De Homine_, _written by Thomas Hobbes. Hobbes Studies 29 (2):207-209.
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  8.  1
    George Wright (2016). Thomas Hobbes Et L’Histoire: Système Et Récits À L’Âge Classique_, _written by Nicolas Dubos. Hobbes Studies 29 (2):215-220.
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  9.  7
    Franco Giudice (2016). Optics in Hobbes’s Natural Philosophy. Hobbes Studies 29 (1):86-102.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 86 - 102 The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the place that Hobbes assigns to optics in the context of his classification of sciences and disciplinary boundaries. To do this, I will begin with an account of Hobbes’s conception of philosophy or science, and particularly his distinction between true and hypothetical knowledge. I will also show that in his demarcation between mathematics or geometry and natural philosophy Hobbes was (...)
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  10.  4
    John Henry (2016). Hobbes, Galileo, and the Physics of Simple Circular Motions. Hobbes Studies 29 (1):9-38.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 9 - 38 Hobbes tried to develop a strict version of the mechanical philosophy, in which all physical phenomena were explained only in terms of bodies in motion, and the only forces allowed were forces of collision or impact. This ambition puts Hobbes into a select group of original thinkers, alongside Galileo, Isaac Beeckman, and Descartes. No other early modern thinkers developed a strict version of the mechanical philosophy. Natural philosophies relying solely on (...)
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  11.  8
    Douglas Jesseph (2016). Hobbes on ‘Conatus’: A Study in the Foundations of Hobbesian Philosophy. Hobbes Studies 29 (1):66-85.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 66 - 85 This paper will deal with the notion of _conatus_ and the role it plays in Hobbes’s program for natural philosophy. As defined by Hobbes, the _conatus_ of a body is essentially its instantaneous motion, and he sees this as the means to account for a variety of phenomena in both natural philosophy and mathematics. Although I foucs principally on Hobbesian physics, I will also consider the extent to which Hobbes’s account (...)
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  12.  2
    Agostino Lupoli (2016). Optics, Simple Circular Motion and Conatus. Hobbes Studies 29 (1):1-7.
  13.  7
    José Médina (2016). Hobbes’s Geometrical Optics. Hobbes Studies 29 (1):39-65.
    _ Source: _Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 39 - 65 Since Euclid, optics has been considered a geometrical science, which Aristotle defines as a “mixed” mathematical science. Hobbes follows this tradition and clearly places optics among physical sciences. However, modern scholars point to a confusion between geometry and physics and do not seem to agree about the way Hobbes mixes both sciences. In this paper, I return to this alleged confusion and intend to emphasize the peculiarity of Hobbes’s geometrical optics. (...)
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