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  1. Marcus Arvan (2014). Why Hobbes Cannot Limit the Leviathan: A Critical Commentary on Larry May's Limiting Leviathan. Hobbes Studies 27 (2).
    This commentary contends that Larry May’s Hobbesian argument for limitations on sovereignty and lawmaking in Limiting Leviathan does not succeed. First, I show that Hobbes begins with a plausible instrumental theory of normativity. Second, I show that Hobbes then attempts, unsuccessfully—by his own lights—to defend a kind of non-instrumental, moral normativity. Thus, I contend, in order to successfully “limit the Leviathan” of the state, the Hobbesian must provide a sound instrumental argument in favor of the sovereign limiting their actions and (...)
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  2. Marcus P. Adams (2014). Hobbes, Definitions, and Simplest Conceptions. Hobbes Studies 27 (1):35-60.
    Several recent commentators argue that Thomas Hobbes’s account of the nature of science is conventionalist. Engaging in scientific practice on a conventionalist account is more a matter of making sure one connects one term to another properly rather than checking one’s claims, e.g., by experiment. In this paper, I argue that the conventionalist interpretation of Hobbesian science accords neither with Hobbes’s theoretical account in De corpore and Leviathan nor with Hobbes’s scientific practice in De homine and elsewhere. Closely tied to (...)
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  3. Geoffrey Gorham (2014). Hobbes on the Reality of Time. Hobbes Studies 27 (1):80-103.
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  4. Peter Machamer (2014). Thomas Hobbes. Hobbes Studies 27 (1):1-12.
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  5. Edward Slowik (2014). Hobbes and the Phantasm of Space. Hobbes Studies 27 (1):61-79.
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  6. Kathryn Tabb (2014). The Fate of Nebuchadnezzar. Hobbes Studies 27 (1):13-34.
    This paper makes a case for the centrality of the passion of curiosity to Hobbes’s account of human nature. Hobbes describes curiosity as one of only a few capacities differentiating human beings from animals, and I argue that it is in fact the fundamen- tal cause of humanity’s uniqueness, generating other important difference-makers such as language, science and politics. I qualify Philip Pettit’s (2008) claim that Hobbes believes language to be the essence of human difference, contending that Pettit grants language (...)
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  7. Stewart Duncan (2014). Comments on Larry May, Limiting Leviathan. Hobbes Studies 27:185-190.
    Draft for a forthcoming special section of Hobbes Studies on May's book. -/- This paper discusses two aspects of Larry May's book Limiting Leviathan. First it discusses a passage in Leviathan, to which May draws attention, in which Hobbes connects obligation to "that, which in the disputations of scholars is called absurdity". Secondly it looks at the book's discussion of Hobbes and pacifist attitudes, with reference to Hobbes's contemporary critic John Eachard.
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