12 found

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  1.  1
    Andrew T. Forcehimes (2015). Leviathans Restrained: International Politics for Artificial Persons. Hobbes Studies 28 (2):149-174.
    _ Source: _Volume 28, Issue 2, pp 149 - 174 This essay challenges the _analogy argument_. The analogy argument aims to show that the international domain satisfies the conditions of a Hobbesian state of nature: There fails to be a super-sovereign to keep all in awe, and hence, like persons in the state of nature, sovereigns are in a war every sovereign against every sovereign. By turning to Hobbes’ account of authorization, however, we see that subjects are under no obligation (...)
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  2.  4
    Nicholas Gooding (2015). Images of Anarchy: The Rhetoric and Science in Hobbes’s State of Nature_, _written by Evrigenis, Ioannis. Hobbes Studies 28 (2):175-183.
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  3.  3
    Juhana Lemetti (2015). Leviathan, 3 Vols., Edited by Noel Malcolm, The Clarendon Edition of the Works of Thomas Hobbes_, _written by Thomas Hobbbes. Hobbes Studies 28 (2):184-189.
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  4.  3
    Noel Malcolm (2015). Hobbes and Sexual Desire. Hobbes Studies 28 (2):77-102.
    _ Source: _Volume 28, Issue 2, pp 77 - 102 Hobbes has long been associated with the sexual ‘libertinism’ of the Restoration period. The connections that are commonly made are crude, misrepresenting his philosophy; moreover, the attitude to sexual matters expressed in many of his published works was quite puritanical. Yet there are elements of his thought that could be taken to support a libertine agenda: hostility to Augustinian teaching on lust and chastity; the idea that marriage laws (...)
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  5.  1
    Joanne Paul (2015). Counsel, Command and Crisis. Hobbes Studies 28 (2):103-131.
    _ Source: _Volume 28, Issue 2, pp 103 - 131 Although the distinction between counsel and command in Hobbes’s works, especially _Leviathan_, has been often acknowledged, it has been little studied. This article provides background and analysis of this critical distinction by placing it in conversation with the works of Henry Parker and in the context of the English Civil War, especially as regards the discussion of prudence, interests and crisis. In so doing, three conclusions can be drawn. First, it (...)
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  6.  21
    Gregory J. Robson (2015). Two Psychological Defenses of Hobbes’s Claim Against the “Fool”. Hobbes Studies 28 (2):132-148.
    _ Source: _Volume 28, Issue 2, pp 132 - 148 A striking feature of Thomas Hobbes’s account of political obligation is his discussion of the Fool, who thinks it reasonable to adopt a policy of selective, self-interested covenant breaking. Surprisingly, scholars have paid little attention to the potential of a psychological defense of Hobbes’s controversial claim that the Fool behaves irrationally. In this paper, I first describe Hobbes’s account of the Fool and argue that the kind of Fool most worth (...)
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  7.  3
    Terrell Carver (2015). Reflections on Hobbes, Nature and Artifice. Hobbes Studies 28 (1):64-73.
    _ Source: _Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 64 - 73 In his own time Hobbes became a public intellectual even if at times a banned author. Political theorists of today will in some cases recognise similar pressures and dilemmas. As a classic author, however, Hobbes has become a trope in political theory through an overt process of anachronism. The authors in this special issue – Browning, Jaede, Boyd, Prozorov – proceed from this common and canonical content, as does Prokhovnik in (...)
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  8.  3
    Browning Gary (2015). The Politics of Recognition. Hobbes Studies 28 (1):3-17.
    _ Source: _Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 3 - 17 Hobbes and Hegel are standardly taken to be contrasting political theorists, who maintain contrasting views on philosophy, individualism, and society. However, Oakeshott’s reading of Hobbes is a reminder that Hobbes can be read in ways that reduce antagonisms between Hobbes and Hegel. Hobbes’s state of nature is an artificial device that is internally related to the significance of political artifice in rendering the social world a reasonable context for interaction just (...)
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  9.  3
    Maximilian Jaede (2015). Nature and Artifice in Hobbes’s International Political Thought. Hobbes Studies 28 (1):18-34.
    _ Source: _Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 18 - 34 This article argues that the artificiality of Hobbesian states facilitates their coexistence and eventual reconciliation. In particular, it is suggested that international relations may be characterised by an artificial equality, which has a contrary effect to the natural equality of human beings. Unlike individuals in Hobbes’s account of the state of nature, sovereigns are not compelled to wage war out of fear and distrust, but have prudential reasons to exercise self-restraint. (...)
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  10.  1
    Boyd Jonathan (2015). Defence, Civil Honour, and Artificial Will. Hobbes Studies 28 (1):35-49.
    _ Source: _Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 35 - 49 Three influential interpreters – Michael Oakeshott, Leo Strauss, and Carl Schmitt – note that Hobbes’s sovereign is tasked with containing the natural wills of subjects for the sake of civil peace. Yet Hobbes’s sovereign also has a mandate to govern or use his subjects for collective defence, and each suggest that the political-psychological means to ensure submission preclude and prevent the contribution of subjects towards collective ends, which would render Hobbes’s (...)
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  11.  3
    Prokhovnik Raia (2015). Thomas Hobbes and the Politics of Nature and Artifice. Hobbes Studies 28 (1):1-2.
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  12.  3
    Prozorov Sergei (2015). Towards a Post-Hobbesian Political Community? Hobbes Studies 28 (1):50-63.
    _ Source: _Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 50 - 63 The article addresses the attempts of contemporary continental philosophy to develop a politics that would move beyond the Hobbesian logic of the constitution of political community. In their readings of Hobbes, Roberto Esposito and Giorgio Agamben emphasize the nihilistic character of Hobbes’s approach to community. For Esposito, Hobbes’s commonwealth is legitimized by a prior negation of the originary human community in the construction of the state of nature as the state (...)
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