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  1.  5
    Amy K. Donahue & Rohan Kalyan (2015). Guest Editors' Preface. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):122-123.
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  2.  3
    Amy K. Donahue & Rohan Kalyan (2015). Introduction: On the Imperative, Challenges, and Prospects of Decolonizing Comparative Methodologies. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):124-137.
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  3.  4
    David Jones (2015). Editor's Preface. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):121-121.
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  4.  7
    Leah Kalmanson (2015). If You Show Me Yours: Reading All “Difference” as “Colonial Difference” in Comparative Philosophy. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):201-213.
    Postcolonial studies and decolonial theory make visible the nature and extent of Eurocentrism through a critique of constructed categories as basic as “history” and “culture.” Walter Mignolo asserts a strong claim that the concept of “culture” is itself a colonial construction, and hence all cultural difference bears the mark of coloniality. This thesis presents a challenge to the field of comparative philosophy: What does “cross-cultural” philosophy even mean if all so-called cultural difference is indeed colonial difference? Could comparativists, in the (...)
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  5.  7
    Nikolay Karkov (2015). Decolonizing Praxis in Eastern Europe: Toward a South-to-South Dialogue. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):180-200.
    This article pursues two distinct yet interrelated levels of analysis. Theoretically, the article seeks to destabilize Western narratives of a transition from humanism to anti- and post-humanism in radical scholarship by foregrounding two traditions from Eastern Europe and the Caribbean where the language of the human persisted long after its declared obsolescence in the West. The argument made here is that these divergent narratives of the human were neither wholly contingent nor just a matter of distinct intellectual traditions, but were (...)
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  6.  7
    David Haekwon Kim (2015). José Mariátegui's East-South Decolonial Experiment. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):157-179.
    Common notions of comparative philosophy tend to be strongly configured by the East-West axis. This essay suggests ways of seeing Latin American liberation philosophy as a form of comparative philosophy and an important Latin American thinker as being relevant for East-West political philosophy. The essay focuses on the Peruvian activist and intellectual, José Mariátegui, who is widely regarded to have been a leading Marxist, liberatory, and decolonial figure in 20th century Latin America. Like many “Third World” intellectuals of the interwar (...)
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  7.  5
    Sam Okoth Opondo (2015). Afterword—Comparison Zones. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):214-217.
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  8.  9
    Gabriel Soldatenko (2015). A Contribution Toward the Decolonization of Philosophy: Asserting the Coloniality of Power in the Study of Non-Western Philosophical Traditions. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):138-156.
    This article proposes that the study of non-Western philosophical traditions ought to include a critical awareness of the experience, impact, and legacy of colonialism. In this regard, Latin American philosophy offers us a key concept—the coloniality of power. It will be shown that coloniality enriches and complicates our understanding of both the history of Western and non-Western philosophies. More specifically, coloniality helps to clarify and answer the following questions: First, how was it that the discipline of philosophy came to be (...)
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  9.  7
    Vinod Acharya (2015). Science, Culture and Philosophy: The Relation Between Human, All Too Human and Nietzsche's Early Thought. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):18-28.
    The goal of this article is to trace the transformations in Nietzsche’s early thinking that led to the ideas published in Human, All Too Human, the first book of his mature philosophy. In contrast to his early works, in which he sides with art and philosophy in criticizing the scientific culture of his time, Nietzsche, in Human, All Too Human, hails the methodology of science as a way to overcome the metaphysical delusions of philosophy, art, and religion. However, in disagreement (...)
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  10.  9
    Kevin Aho (2015). Heidegger and Silence. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):88-91.
    This short essay offers a critical overview of David Nowell Smith's book Sounding/Silence, focusing on, what the author calls, the “ontologization of poetry” as a way to grasp Heidegger's critique of traditional aesthetics and the novel claim that the human body is already implicated in Heidegger's account of language and poetry. To this end, there is a brief discussion of Heidegger's controversial views on the human/animal relation, the connection between poetry and thinking, and the value of Heidegger's poetics for future (...)
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  11.  6
    Bret W. Davis (2015). Sharing Words of Silence: Panikkar After Gadamer. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):52-68.
    This article elucidates and interpretively develops Raimon Panikkar's hermeneutics of intertraditional dialogue by way of setting it into sympathetic and critical dialogue with the predominantly intratraditional hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer. It argues that Panikkar's thought enables us not only to appreciate, but also to question the limits of the fundamental roles played by language and tradition in Gadamer's hermeneutics. Panikkar's own hermeneutical reflections arise directly out of intertraditional as well as interlinguistic experience; and they ultimately direct us toward the profoundest (...)
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  12.  5
    J. Edward Hackett (2015). The Jamesian Appeal of Scheler's Felt Metaphysics. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):29-43.
    I attempt to solve a problematic feature of Scheler's intentional feeling. Spiritual feelings are disembodied and elements of William James's pragmatism offer a way to make elements of Scheler's phenomenology more concrete than Scheler's phenomenology allows. I then further develop this insight since contact between both Scheler and James opens up possible trajectories and affinities that, in the end, reveal both thinkers share an affective underpinning to their respective metaphysics. In both thinkers, reality is given as felt. As such, this (...)
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  13.  4
    Apple Zefelius Igrek (2015). Beyond Malaise and Euphoria: Herbrechter's Critical Post-Humanism. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):92-97.
    The following essay explores critical post-humanism as elaborated by Stephan Herbrechter. Avoiding the simplistic, deterministic accounts of new technological developments—whether they predict impending apocalypse or future communication systems in which all of humanity becomes perfectly and peacefully united—Herbrechter's analysis reminds us that the democratization of subjects requires an ongoing, persistent deconstruction of the anthropocentric values all too often linked to recent trends in social media, artificial intelligence, genetic enhancements, predictive analytics, digital surveillance, and so on.
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  14.  3
    David Jones (2015). Listening to Nearness: Toward a Sutra of Free-Willing. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):1-5.
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  15.  9
    David Farrell Krell (2015). Emerson—Nietzsche's Voluptuary? Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):8-17.
    This article reflects on the complex nature of Nietzsche's enduring appreciation of Emerson. Rather than rely on merely coincidental similarities between the two thinkers, the essay discerns a more difficult relationship—that of friendship—which somehow, perhaps through character, unites the two without making them the same.
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  16.  3
    Kevin Miles (2015). Missing the Turn Toward “Philosophy Proper”. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):82-87.
    Dwayne Tunstall turns to Lewis Gordon's Africana existential phenomenology in an effort to untangle Marcel's “reflective method” from its involvements with colonial racism. Tunstall's book interprets Marcel's religious existentialism as a development of his attempt to resist modernity's burgeoning dehumanization but observes that Marcel's sociopolitical thought leaves antiblack racism unexamined, which amounts to a failure to attend to “the most noxious form of depersonalization existing in the twentieth century.” In this review I call into question both Marcel's conception of “philosophy (...)
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  17.  5
    Thomas Rhydwen (2015). A Confucian Understanding of the Kyoto School's Wartime Philosophy. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):69-78.
    In his new work on the Kyoto School David Williams presents the first “reading” in English of the complete text of the three Chūō Kōron symposia held by members of the second generation in the early 1940s. In addition, he provides an extensive commentary that explores the inability of “liberal history” to account for the political realities of wartime Japan and the “moral worldview” of the four symposists. Adopting the empirical methodology of earlier works, Williams proposes an alternative thesis of (...)
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  18.  3
    Janae Sholtz (2015). Bruising the Rose: Becoming Beautiful in Gordon Bearn'sLife Drawing: A Deleuzian Aesthetics of Existence. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):98-106.
    This review essay develops Gordon Bearn's interpretation of Deleuze's philosophy as an aesthetic existential indicative of the creative practice of life drawing. Life drawing requires moving beyond various forms of representation that stultify the movement of becoming and limit our ability to appreciate sensuous singularity and intensive pluralities. Sholtz offers an original account of the singularity of sensual existence, amplifying the tenuous relationship between beauty and suffering, or the intensification of life, which Bearn courageously explores. The article addresses several important (...)
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  19.  3
    Geoffrey M. Wilkinson (2015). The Frog and the Basilisk. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):44-51.
    The Judeo-Christian creation myth has a lot to answer for even in our supposedly secular age. In and after the European Enlightenment, the deity who had made heaven and earth became the prototype of impersonal forces—notably Universal Reason, Progress, and History—then believed to be at work in the world. These apparent secularizations of the Word of God, each of which failed in its own way, were expressions of a collective fear of the unintelligible, that is, of the very idea that (...)
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  20.  4
    David Williams (2015). In Response to Thomas Rhydwen. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):79-81.
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  21.  6
    Jason M. Wirth & Michael Schwartz (2015). In This Issue. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):6-7.
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