Year:

  1.  3
    Lei Legeng (2015). Dialectical Interpretation of the So-Called “It's Difficult to Be Muddled” by Zheng Banqiao. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (4):68-81.
    Editor’s: This article gives a dialectical reading of Zheng Banqiao’s calligraphy-saying Nande hutu to come to a deep understanding of its multi-layered meaning. The author sets out with defining the notions of “muddledness” and “smartness” as two different ways of living. He further emphasizes the practical dimension of the philosophy of life underlying Nande hutu and goes deeper into several concrete domains of application in daily life by referring to historical figures and events. The dialectics of the saying is also (...)
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  2.  5
    Mieke Matthyssen (2015). Zheng Banqiao’s Nande Hutu and “the Art of Being Muddled” in Contemporary China. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (4):3-25.
    :In 1751, Zheng Banqiao wrote his famous calligraphy Nande hutu. Inquiries into the calligraphy reveal different dimensions of the saying. Its most popular interpretation can be found in self-improvement books on “the art of being muddled”. What academic, official, and popular discourses on the saying have in common is their dialectical reasoning and frequent references to other popular related sayings, to quotes from the ancient classics, and to ancient heroes and historical figures. This issue will explore a few interpretations of (...)
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  3.  1
    Li Qiao (2015). The “Being Muddled Is Difficult” of Zheng Banqiao. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (4):26-31.
    Editor's: In this essay, author Li Qiao first briefly introduces the calligraphy Nande hutu and its author, Zheng Banqiao. Further, through analysis of the different components of the postscript of the calligraphy, he elaborates on two common interpretations of the saying, that is an active and enterprising and a passive, “muddling through” interpretation. The author argues that because the contemporary interpretations contain much of the passive, “take-it-easy” component, it is very popular nowadays.The essay dates from 1986, which was a period (...)
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  4.  3
    Li Shaolong (2015). The “Being Muddled Is Difficult” Thought in Traditional Chinese Culture. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (4):32-57.
    Editor’s: This article by Li Shaolong defines the thought of “being muddled is difficult” as a special feature of the mode of thinking and surviving in Chinese culture. The author argues that the occurrence of the thought of “being muddled is difficult” was a necessity of the development of Chinese culture. According to the author, the core connotation of Nande hutu is not being muddled in a conventional sense, nor is it deference and retreat in a pure sense. Rather, it (...)
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  5.  1
    Yang Tao (2015). Chapter 6: Living: The Rules of Being Muddled to Be Carefree and Enjoy Life. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (4):82-102.
    Editor’s: This text is the partial translation of one of the nine chapters from the self-improvement book titled The Art of Being Muddled in Social Conduct and Handling Affairs. This chapter in particular discusses “being muddled” as an efficient, harmony-oriented philosophy of life for navigating more positively through life and for obtaining inner peace of mind. The domains of life covered range from family life to business negotiations, and almost en passant, life issues as serious as suicide. All statements and (...)
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  6.  3
    Wang Zisong (2015). “Being Muddled Is Difficult” Is Not Needed: An Analytic Discussion Starting From Aristotle. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (4):58-67.
    Editor’s: Around the 300th anniversary of Zheng Banqiao, many articles appeared dealing with the artist Zheng Banqiao and his works of art. Some of these dealt specifically with his calligraphy Nande hutu. Most of these articles address its philosophical meaning or socio-historical context. In this essay, author Wang Zisong elaborates on how the Chinese philosophy of muddled, synthetic thinking relates to Aristotelian, analytical thinking. The author first reflects on the origins of Western analytical, logical and categorical thinking, and argues that (...)
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  7.  2
    Yong Huang (2015). Yin,Zhi, andRen: A New Round of Debate ConcerningAnalects13.18. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (3):3-16.
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  8.  3
    Liao Mingchun (2015). A New Interpretation ofAnalects13.18. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (3):17-39.
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  9.  2
    Guo Qiyong & Zhang Zhiqiang (2015). Mutual Concealment Between Relatives Revisited: A Response to Liao Mingchun and Liang Tao. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (3):67-95.
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  10.  2
    Liang Tao (2015). Thinking Through the Notion of “Relatives Covering for Each Other” in Comparison with “Covering and Taking Responsibility for Their Faults”. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (3):40-66.
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  11.  1
    Alexander Berkman (2015). On the Tenth Anniversary of the Russian Revolution. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (2):47-51.
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  12.  1
    Feigan (2015). Marx’s “Dictatorship of the Proletariat”. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (2):22-36.
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  13.  2
    Hei Lang (2015). Anticommunists and Reactionaries. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (2):45-46.
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  14.  1
    John A. Rapp & Daniel M. Youd (2015). Ba Jin as Anarchist Critic of Marxism. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (2):3-21.
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  15.  1
    Hu Wanchun & Tang Kexin (2015). Thoroughly Expose Ba Jin’s Counterrevolutionary True Face. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (2):70-82.
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  16.  1
    Yao Wenyuan (2015). On the Anarchist Ideas in Ba Jin’s NovelDestruction. Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (2):56-69.
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