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  1. J. P. Bishop (2014). Christian Morality in a Post-Christian Medical System. Christian Bioethics 20 (3):319-329.
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  2. P. C. Burcham (2014). Science in Two Minds: Reflections on the Missional Disunity Within Contemporary Medicine. Christian Bioethics 20 (3):359-375.
  3. T. M. McConnell & R. A. McConnell (2014). The Need for Dialogical Encounter: An Account of Christian Parents' Making Decisions on Behalf of Their Severely Handicapped Child. Christian Bioethics 20 (3):376-389.
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  4. R. R. Nash (2014). On Allen Verhey, In Memoriam. Christian Bioethics 20 (3):390-391.
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  5. P. G. Tyson (2014). The Wounds of Faith and Medicine, and the Balm of Paradox. Christian Bioethics 20 (3):330-358.
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  6. B. Goss & R. Vitz (2014). Natural Law Among Moral Strangers. Christian Bioethics 20 (2):283-300.
    Our goal in this paper is two-fold. First, we aim to clarify two ways in which contemporary Christian bioethicists have erred, on Engelhardt’s account, in their attempts to do bioethics within a distinctively non-Christian idiom, namely, either (1) by rejecting a principal metaethical thesis or (2) by misrepresenting a principal moral-epistemological thesis of natural-law ethics, properly construed. Second, we intend to show not only that Engelhardt can and should endorse the Christian bioethicists’ use of non-Christian moral idioms in the public (...)
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  7. D. T. Ball (2014). Calvin and the Duty to Respect a Patient's Trust. Christian Bioethics 20 (1):112-122.
    Contemporary bioethical theory relies upon the concept of informed consent to protect against abuses of patient autonomy. Due to the complexity of the informed consent process, however, many patients rely more on their trust in their health care providers than they do upon their own ability to decide whether or not to give informed consent. Reformation theologian John Calvin placed a strong emphasis on the decision-maker's duty to respect the trust that others repose in the decision-maker. In keeping with Calvin's (...)
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  8. C. C. Carlton (2014). Can Beauty Save Calvin? A Reply to Kornu. Christian Bioethics 20 (1):59-66.
    This article argues that Dr. Kornu has failed to demonstrate how Jonathan Edward’s theology of beauty can substantively contribute to a contemporary Christian theology of medicine. Edward’s appropriation of Neo-Platonic language is contrasted with the use of the same language by the Orthodox Church Fathers. It is argued that the absence of a mystical understanding of theology, sacramental church structure, and ascetical discipline within the Reformed Tradition renders any attempt to appropriate a Neo-Platonic understanding of beauty ineffectual.
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  9. K. Kornu (2014). The Beauty of Healing: Covenant, Eschatology, and Jonathan Edwards' Theological Aesthetics Toward a Theology of Medicine. Christian Bioethics 20 (1):43-58.
    Jonathan Edwards, despite being considered one of the greatest American philosopher-theologians, has yet to grace the bioethics scene. In this essay, I contend that Edwards’ synthesis of Reformed theology and unique concept of beauty can provide a significant metaethics to Reformed theological ethics and contemporary bioethics. First, I explore Edwards’ notion of beauty and how its theocentrism integrates divine communication and creational typology in the context of redemptive history. Second, I develop a biblical framework for a covenantal, eschatological theology of (...)
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  10. D. R. Maddox (2014). A New Reformation in Medicine. Christian Bioethics 20 (1):97-111.
    Calvin approached every question that confronted him by turning to the Scriptures. His spiritual heirs were the makers of modern medicine. However, the fruit borne by his theology has become rotten, through secularization and the excess of its success. By returning to the Scriptures, and particularly Calvin's understanding of the role of the deacon, we can begin again to do the work Christ has for us in the world, building the true City and reversing the curse.
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  11. R. R. Nash (2014). Calvinism, Reformed Protestantism, and Bioethics: Are the Controversies Predestined? Christian Bioethics 20 (1):123-139.
    This is an essay in controversy theory. It focuses on the question of how Reformed Christian theologians can help their bioethics have appropriate content and secure proper boundaries. After all, one wants to know when Christian bioethics is still Christian. Among the cardinal issues this involves is the challenge to scholars in Reformed Christian bioethics to define their field and give normative guidance. This cluster of problems will be addressed by exploring puzzles regarding the character of Reformed Christian theology in (...)
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  12. R. R. Nash (2014). Reformed Christian Bioethics: Developing a Field of Scholarship. Christian Bioethics 20 (1):5-8.
    What is a Reformed Christian Bioethics? This issue of Christian Bioethics attempts to begin a scholarly answer to this question. Most of the papers are offered by Reformed Protestants. They present a diversity of Reformed thought but at least tend to agree on the primacy of scripture as an authority, the relative authority of historical Reformed figures, and the insufficiency of a purely secular bioethics. As counterpoints to help further define the boundaries of the field two essays by Orthodox Christians (...)
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  13. F. E. Payne (2014). Health and Medicine in the Perspective of the Westminster Confession of Faith. Christian Bioethics 20 (1):67-79.
    The Presbyterian and Reformed tradition, as one representation of Biblical theology and ethics, has considerable application to physical health. This perspective is effectively embodied in the Westminster Confession of Faith which includes “the moral law,” especially as illustrated in the Larger Catechism Questions and Answers on the Ten Commandments. The WCF has many Biblical principles that promote health and prevent disease, for example, the Seventh Commandment can be “extensively demonstrated empirically” that violations promote morbidity and mortality. This result markedly contrasts (...)
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  14. L. M. Perry (2014). The Word for an Addict in Geneva (Calvin on Addiction). Christian Bioethics 20 (1):80-96.
    Addiction is a puzzle for popular understandings of human action. An addicted person may not simply choose to quit, nor can an addiction be reduced to a physiological predisposition to consume. After demonstrating some of the complexities of addiction that confound these misconceptions, I rely on Kent Dunnington’s Addiction and Virtue to situate addiction within the category of ‘habit.’ Then, I turn to John Calvin's brilliant description of the human person to further categorize an addiction as a religious habit. I (...)
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  15. J. C. Tilburt (2014). Introduction: Overhearing Strange Voices Next Door. Christian Bioethics 20 (1):1-4.
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  16. J. C. Tilburt & K. M. Humeniuk (2014). Reframing the Relevance of Calvinism and the Reformed Tradition for 21st Century Bioethics. Christian Bioethics 20 (1):9-22.
    Many in academic bioethics worry that robust theological traditions, when articulated in the public square, damage the prospect of serious reflection about tough cases. Here we challenge that prevailing exclusion-by-default methodological impulse by correcting prevalent stereotypes about one particular Christian tradition that may offer relevant conceptual resources for bioethics. We briefly examine the man, John Calvin, and the Calvinist/Reformed Protestant tradition to show how it has been misconstrued in academic bioethics but can be reconstrued as a constructive, substantive theological starting (...)
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  17. A. Verhey (2014). Can Calvin Save Medicine? A Response to Jeff Bishop. Christian Bioethics 20 (1):23-42.
    The article begins with a summary of Jeffrey Bishop’s The Anticipatory Corpse. Bishop traces the malady of contemporary medicine to its reliance on the corpse as the “epistemologically normative body” and its “metaphysics of efficient causation.” He displays care for the dying as symptomatic of medicine’s malady. He closes the book with the provocative question of whether “only theology can save medicine.” The article then turns to the theology of John Calvin as a possible resource for the re-imagining of medicine, (...)
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