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  1. Jacquineau Azétsop & Michael Ochieng (2015). The Right to Health, Health Systems Development and Public Health Policy Challenges in Chad. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):1.
    There is increasing consensus that the right to health can provide ethical, policy and practical groundings for health systems development. The goals of the right to health are congruent with those of health systems development, which are about strengthening health promotion organizations and actions so as to improve public health. The poor shape and performance of health systems in Chad question the extent of realization of the right to health. Due to its comprehensiveness and inclusiveness, the right to health has (...)
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  2. Solomon Benatar (2015). Explaining and Responding to the Ebola Epidemic. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):5.
    The Ebola epidemic in West Africa is not merely a biomedical problem that can be seen in isolation and dealt with only through emergency medical rescue processes. The ethical dilemmas surfaced by this epidemic are also not confined to the usual micro-ethical problems associated with medical care and medical research. The pandemic, as one of many manifestations of failed human and social development that has brought the world to dangerous ‘tipping points’, requires deep introspection and action to address upstream causal (...)
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  3. Martina Darragh, Liana Buniak & James Giordano (2015). A Four-Part Working Bibliography of Neuroethics: Part 2 – Neuroscientific Studies of Morality and Ethics. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):2.
    Moral philosophy and psychology have sought to define the nature of right and wrong, and good and evil. The industrial turn of the twentieth century fostered increasingly technological approaches that conjoined philosophy to psychology, and psychology to the natural sciences. Thus, moral philosophy and psychology became ever more vested to investigations of the anatomic structures and physiologic processes involved in cognition, emotion and behavior - ultimately falling under the rubric of the neurosciences. Since 2002, neuroscientific studies of moral thought, emotions (...)
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  4. Iona Heath (2015). Arm in Arm with Righteousness. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):7.
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  5. Andrea Lavazza (2015). Erasing Traumatic Memories: When Context and Social Interests Can Outweigh Personal Autonomy. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):3.
    Neuroscientific research on the removal of unpleasant and traumatic memories is still at a very early stage, but is making rapid progress and has stirred a significant philosophical and neuroethical debate. Even if memory is considered to be a fundamental element of personal identity, in the context of memory-erasing the autonomy of decision-making seems prevailing. However, there seem to be situations where the overall context in which people might choose to intervene on their memories would lead to view those actions (...)
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  6. Kiloran H. M. Metcalfe, Calum A. Worsley, Casey B. Swerner, Devan Sinha, Ravi Solanki, Krithi Ravi & Raj S. Dattani (2015). The 2014 Varsity Medical Ethics Debate: Should We Allow Genetic Information to Be Patented? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):8.
    The 2014 Varsity Medical Ethics debate convened upon the motion: “This house believes that genetic information should not be commoditised”. This annual debate between students from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, now in its sixth year, provided the starting point for arguments on the subject. The present article brings together and extends many of the arguments put forward during the debate. We explore the circumstances under which genetic material should be considered patentable, the possible effects of this on the (...)
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  7. Susan M. Setta & Sam D. Shemie (2015). An Explanation and Analysis of How World Religions Formulate Their Ethical Decisions on Withdrawing Treatment and Determining Death. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):6.
    This paper explores definitions of death from the perspectives of several world and indigenous religions, with practical application for health care providers in relation to end of life decisions and organ and tissue donation after death. It provides background material on several traditions and explains how different religions derive their conclusions for end of life decisions from the ethical guidelines they proffer.
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  8. Yuliya Zaytseva, Raymond C. K. Chan, Ernst Pöppel & Andreas Heinz (2015). Luria Revisited: Cognitive Research in Schizophrenia, Past Implications and Future Challenges. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):4.
    Contemporary psychiatry is becoming more biologically oriented in the attempt to elicit a biological rationale of mental diseases. Although mental disorders comprise mostly functional abnormalities, there is a substantial overlap between neurology and psychiatry in addressing cognitive disturbances. In schizophrenia, the presence of cognitive impairment prior to the onset of psychosis and early after its manifestation suggests that some neurocognitive abnormalities precede the onset of psychosis and may represent a trait marker. These cognitive alterations may arise from functional disconnectivity, as (...)
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