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  1.  1
    Whitney Barnett, Kirsty Brittain, Katherine Sorsdahl, Heather J. Zar & Dan J. Stein (2016). Maternal Participant Experience in a South African Birth Cohort Study Enrolling Healthy Pregnant Women and Their Infants. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):3.
    BackgroundCritical to conducting high quality research is the ability to attract and retain participants, especially for longitudinal studies. Understanding participant experiences and motivators or barriers to participating in clinical research is crucial. There are limited data on healthy participant experiences in longitudinal research, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. This study aims to investigate quantitatively participant experiences in a South African birth cohort study.MethodsMaternal participant experience was evaluated by a self-administered survey in the Drakenstein Child Health Study, a longitudinal birth (...)
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  2.  1
    Kevin G. Donovan & James Giordano (2016). Acknowledgement of Manuscript Reviewers 2015. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):1.
    Contributing reviewersThe editors of Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in Volume 10.
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  3.  6
    Sohair R. Fahmy & Khadiga Gaafar (2016). Establishing the First Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee in Egypt. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):1-6.
    BackgroundAlthough animal research ethics committees are well established in Western countries, this field is weakly developed and its concept is poorly understood in the Middle East and North Africa region.ObjectiveOur main objective was to introduce the concept and requirements of ethical approaches in dealing with experimental animal in research and teaching in Egypt.MethodsDue to its very recent inception, Cairo University, Faculty of Science IACUC decided to operate in accordance with Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals 8th Edition (...)
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  4.  2
    Mark A. Graber & Olivia Bailey (2016). The Wizard Behind the Curtain: Programmers as Providers. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):4.
    It is almost universally accepted that traditional provider-patient relationships should be governed, at least in part, by the ethical principles set forth by Beauchamp and Childress. These principles include autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. Recently, however, the nature of medial practice has changed. The pervasive presence of computer technology in medicine raises interesting ethical questions. In this paper we argue that some software designers should be considered health care providers and thus be subject the ethical principles incumbent upon “traditional” providers. (...)
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  5. Marcelo Saad & Roberta de Medeiros (2016). Programs of Religious/Spiritual Support in Hospitals - Five “Whies” and Five “Hows”. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):5.
    A contemporary orientation of the hospital experience model must encompass the clients’ religious-spiritual dimension. The objective of this paper is to share a previous experience, highlighting at least five reasons hospitals should invest in this direction, and an equal number of steps required to achieve it. In the first part, the text discourses about five reasons to invest in religious-spiritual support programs: 1. Religious-spiritual wellbeing is related to better health; 2. Religious-spiritual appreciation is a standard for hospital accreditation; 3. To (...)
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