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  1. Lior Barshack (2014). Dignity, Descent, and the Rights to Family Life. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (2):161-193.
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  2. Martha M. Ertman (2014). Unexpected Links Between Baby Markets and Intergenerational Justice. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (2):271-295.
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  3. Pamela Laufer-Ukeles (2014). The Lost Children: When the Right to Children Conflicts with the Rights of Children. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (2):219-270.
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  4. Shahar Lifshitz (2014). Neither Nature nor Contract: Toward an Institutional Perspective on Parenthood Essay. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (2):297-333.
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  5. Daniel Mishori (2014). Reclaiming Commons Rights: Resources, Public Ownership and the Rights of Future Generations. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (2):335-366.
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  6. J. E. Penner (2014). Intergenerational Justice and the “Hereditary Principle. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (2):195-217.
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  7. Gregory S. Alexander (2014). Intergenerational Communities. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (1):21-57.
    Under the human flourishing theory of property, owners have obligations, positive as well as negative, that they owe to members of the various communities to which they belong. But are the members of those communities limited to living persons, or do they include non-living persons as well, i.e., future persons and the dead? This Article argues that owners owe two sorts of obligation to non-living members of our generational communities, one general, the other specific. The general obligation is to provide (...)
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  8. Elizabeth Bartholet (2014). Intergenerational Justice for Children: Restructuring Adoption, Reproduction and Child Welfare Policy. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (1):103-130.
    An intergenerational justice perspective requires that we look at the condition of the existing generation of children and those to be born in the future. Many millions of the existing generation of children are now in trouble and at high risk of never fulfilling their human potential. These children are in turn unlikely, if they live to produce children, to be capable of providing the nurturing parenting that the next generation will need.The article’s starting premises are that we should count (...)
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  9. Daphna Hacker (2014). Intergenerational Wealth Transfer and the Need to Revive and Metamorphose the Israeli Estate Tax. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (1):59-101.
    This article suggests enacting an accession tax instead of the estate duty – which was repealed in Israel in 1981. This suggestion evolves from historical and normative explorations of the tension between perceptions of familial intergenerational property rights and justifications for the “death tax,” as termed by its opponents, i.e., estate and inheritance tax. First, the Article explores this tension as expressed in the history of the Israeli Estate Duty Law. This chronological survey reveals a move from the State’s taken-for-granted (...)
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  10. David Heyd (2014). Parfit on the Non-Identity Problem, Again. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (1):1-20.
    In his recent work, Parfit returns to the examination of the non-identity problem, but this time not in the context of a theory of value but as part of a Scanlonian theory of reasons for action. His project is to find a middle ground between pure impersonalism and the narrow person-affecting view so as to do justice to some of our fundamental intuitions regarding procreative choices. The aim of this article is to show that despite the sophisticated and challenging thought (...)
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  11. Shelly Kreiczer-Levy (2014). Intergenerational Relations and the Family Home. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (1):131-160.
    This article examines the issue of intergenerational cohabitation in the family home. Its primary purpose is to demonstrate that current analysis of internal conflicts in the home is lacking, both in terms of identifying the parties’ interests and characterizing the tensions involved. It focuses on a specific three-way conflict between two parents and their adult child and identifies each of their points of view: one parent who wants the adult child to move out, one parent who wants to continue to (...)
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