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  1. Michael W. Barclay (1992). The Utility of Hermeneutic Interpretation in Psychotherapy. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (2):103-118.
    Examines how a hermeneutic psychotherapy might be possible by adapting interpretive theory arising in the human sciences and in response to the critiques that continue to question hermeneutics proper. Based on the work of several noted researchers, including M. Foucault , M. Merleau-Ponty , and H. Dreyfus and P. Rabinow , such topics as the relationship of psychoanalysis and phenomenology, the distinction of hermeneutics and interpretive analytics, hermeneutics and the deep self, and hermeneutics and psychoanalysis are discussed. 2012 APA, all (...)
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  2. William H. Helme (1992). Reformulating Psychology as a Human Science. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (2):119-136.
    Proposes a new formulation of psychology as a human science that integrates 5 unique qualities of the human experience and behavior: symbolic communication, social focus and context, self-knowledge of intentional behavior, organization of behavior as "narratives" of intentional events, and the key "role of knowing self" in human comprehension and action. These qualities are integrated on the basis of scientific comprehension of lawful processes in the natural sciences and new developments in neuroscience, information, and cognitive science. 2012 APA, all rights (...)
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  3. Arnold Kozak (1992). The Epistemic Consequences of Pervasive and Embodied Metaphor: Applications to Psychotherapy. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (2):137-154.
    Examines the pervasive nature of metaphor in conceptual, rational, and narrative experience and demonstrates that conceptual and communicative meaning is dependent on metaphorical understandings. It is suggested that these understandings are primary and derived from embodied experience and cannot be understood outside of this experience. Metaphors are the expressions of preconceptual experiences that are organized into conceptual thought via image schemata. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  4. Rolf von Eckartsberg (1992). Plurality in Social Psychology. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (2):79-102.
    Argues that social psychology should be considered a polyparadigmatic enterprise based on human science social psychology theories and discusses the nature of a paradigm and the social character of paradigm-construction as a knowledge-building industry. Four major approaches of human science social psychology are presented: existential-phenomenology, hermeneutical dialectics, dialogal existentialism, and critical emancipatory theory. These approaches are discussed in terms of the changing meanings of intentionality. "Way of Life Psychology" is presented as a discipline capable of integrating the contributions of the (...)
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  5. Simms Eva-Maria (1992). Review of Technology as Symptom and Dream. [REVIEW] Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (1):63-66.
    Reviews the book, Technology as symptom and dream by Robert D. Romanyshyn . This book is an empassioned call to reexamine the history of technology and to remember the desire that propelled it. Faced with the atom bomb and space flight, we can no longer ignore, Romanyshyn argues, the possibility of the final destruction of our planet. True to his vocation as a psychologist, Romanyshyn finds that the path toward preventing the suicide of mankind lies in re-examining, reflecting and retelling (...)
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  6. George S. Howard (1992). No Middle Voice. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (1):12-26.
    Discusses the Whorf-Sapir hypothesis, which maintains that nature be dissected along the lines laid down by native language. One characteristic of most modern languages is that subject–verb relationships can be expressed only in active and passive voices . Modern languages might force people into dichotomous thinking patterns, since human action is couched primarily in one voice or the other. Throughout history, several languages have possessed middle voices which allow for a more complex relationship between a subject and verb than can (...)
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  7. T. Lincoln Peterson (1992). Review of Challenging the Therapeutic State: Critical Perspectives on Psychiatry and the Mental Health System. [REVIEW] Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (1):59-62.
    Reviews the special issue of The Journal of Mind and Behavior, Challenging the therapeutic state: Critical perspectives on psychiatry and the mental health system, edited by D. Cohen . This special issue serves as an update on the critique of the medical model in psychiatry. In editing this volume, Cohen has assembled a collection of work from authors in many disciplines—including some laypersons—who are concerned with what they see as the frightening power of the "Therapeutic State." While the work of (...)
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  8. Kaisa Puhakka (1992). Discovery as Seeing: Lessons From Radical Empiricism and Meditative Practice. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (1):48-58.
    Suggests that genuine discovery in the context of qualitative research implies a distance between what is seen in the phenomenological sense and what has already been described. The ingenuity of William James's descriptions of hitherto undescribed aspects of everyday experience are rooted in an openness to seeing that characterizes his "radical empiricism." James was a pathfinder and explorer who did introspection and discovered the phenomena of transitive consciousness. The concepts of seeing as the mode of discovery, problematics of the intentionality (...)
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  9. Emily M. Reynolds (1992). Socially Constructing Sexuality: Toward a Postmodernist Theory of Sexual Intimacy. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (1):38-47.
    Takes issue with the biological focus of traditional theories of sexuality, drawing on postmodern trends such as hermeneutics and social constructionism. It is argued that traditional theories are characterized by a reductionism that precludes meaningfulness and an individualism that precludes genuine intimacy. The theories thus offer an essentially barren account of what is otherwise a richly meaningful human activity. A more fruitful account of human sexuality begins with acknowledging that sexuality is a fundamentally social and meaningful phenomenon and that it (...)
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  10. Jeff Sugarman (1992). Round the Epistemological Bend: A Comment on “Levels of Analysis and the Received View-Hermeneutics Controversy”. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (1):27-37.
    Comments on the article, "Levels of analysis and the received view-hermeneutics controversy," by E. Morgan . The absence of criteria with which to compare and evaluate the legitimacy of dissimilar clinical psychology theories has fueled the quest for a "superordinate epistemology." This paper addresses Morgan's use of a constructivist analysis to make claims regarding the constitutive nature of a superordinate epistemology. It is argued that constructivism, as a post-epistemological position, is inappropriate to the task Morgan sets. Also, it is held (...)
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  11. Guy A. M. Widdershoven (1992). Hermeneutics and Relativism: Wittgenstein, Gadamer, Habermas. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 12 (1):1-11.
    Presents 3 hermeneutic answers to the problem of relativism. The 1st answer is drawn from L. Wittgenstein's anthropological hermeneutics. Wittgenstein went beyond relativism by making explicit universal anthropological categories that are specified differently in different cultures. The 2nd answer lies in H.-G. Gadamer's historical hermeneutics. By introducing the concepts of tradition and fusion of horizons, Gadamer evades both absolutism and relativism. The 3rd answer is developed by J. Habermas in his critical hermeneutics. By situating communicative action in the life-world, and (...)
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