Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  14
    Ada S. Jaarsma, Kyle Kinaschuk & Lin Xing (forthcoming). Kierkegaard, Despair and the Possibility of Education: Teaching Existentialism Existentially. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-17.
    Written collaboratively by two undergraduate students and one professor, this article explores what it would mean to teach existentialism “existentially.” We conducted a survey of how Existentialism is currently taught in universities across North America, concluding that, while existentialism courses tend to resemble other undergraduate philosophy courses, existentialist texts challenge us to rethink conventional teaching practices. Looking to thinkers like Kierkegaard, Beauvoir and Arendt for insights into the nature of pedagogy, as well as recent work by Gert Biesta, we lay (...)
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  2. Clémentine Beauvais & Rupert Higham (forthcoming). A Reappraisal of Children’s ‘Potential’. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-15.
    What does it mean for a child to fulfil his or her potential? This article explores the contexts and implications of the much-used concept of potential in educational discourses. We claim that many of the popular, political and educational uses of the term in relation to childhood have a problematic blind spot: interpersonality, and the necessary coexistence for the concept to be receivable of all children’s ‘potentials’. Rather than advocating abandoning the term—a futile gesture given its emotive force—we argue that (...)
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  3.  1
    Kipton E. Jensen (forthcoming). Pedagogical Personalism at Morehouse College. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-19.
    This essay describes a visionary philosophy of education at Morehouse College. The educational process at Morehouse, construed here as a form of pedagogical personalism, is personified in three luminaries of Morehouse College: Benjamin Elijah Mays, Howard Washington Thurman, and Martin Luther King. The educational process at Morehouse should be interpreted as an ambivalent response to segregation and discrimination in Jim Crow America. Like all black institutions in the South, Morehouse was subject to racist constraints; Morehouse was created and existed in (...)
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  4.  2
    Stephen Boulter (forthcoming). Education From a Biological Point of View. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-16.
    There appears to be an irresolvable disagreement between “progressives” and “conservatives” regarding the ultimate aims of education. This paper argues that the dispute is irresolvable as it currently stands because the traditional progressive/conservative dichotomies are false and based on distorted half-truths. The current impasse is due to the fact that educationalists and philosophers alike have hitherto misunderstood the fundamental purpose of educational activities. The central claim of this paper is that a biological perspective on education allows one to (...)
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  5. S. Daniel Breslauer (forthcoming). Martin Buber’s Myth of Zion: National Education or Counter-Education? Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-19.
    If national education is, as Ilan Gur-Ze’ev thinks, inevitably a matter of agents for and victims of a national system, only a “counter-education” can correct it. Martin Buber shared many of Gur-Ze’ev’s concerns, but advocated a more positive view of national education. This essay examines Buber’s development of his pedagogical theory in its context, notes his influence on several educational models, investigates how his view of national education either continues or is ignored in the modern State of (...)
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  6.  1
    Gail Corrado (forthcoming). Scripts, Tricks and Capability Theory: Using an Empirical Window Into the Logic of Achievement to Illustrate How a Critical Addition to Capability Theory Might Work to Guide Action. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-16.
    Capability theory improves our understanding of well being because it takes account of the “conversion” problem: income/wealth/commodities. need to be made effectively available to really increase well being. However, just as IWCs need to be converted into functionings in order to be effective in bringing additional possibilities to a person, our institutions, abilities and environments need to be converted as well to allow them to be used effectively in the same pursuit. Freedom of the press and speech, education and certainly (...)
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  7. Sarah J. DesRoches (forthcoming). An Education of Shared Fates: Recasting Citizenship Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-13.
    In this paper I explore how citizenship education might position students as always/everywhere political to diminish the pervasive belief that one either is or is not a “political person.” By focusing on how liberal and radical democracy are both necessary frameworks for engaging with issues of power, I address how we might reframe citizenship education to highlight the ubiquity of politics, offering a deepened sense of democracy. This reframing of citizenship education entails highlighting how liberalism and radical democracy are mutually (...)
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  8.  2
    Melina Duarte (forthcoming). Educating Citizens for Humanism: Nussbaum and the Education Crisis. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-14.
    “What purpose does your knowledge serve?” In her book, Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities, Martha Nussbaum states the difference between a democratic education for citizenship and an education for profit, and draws attention to the current education crisis caused by an overvaluation of the latter over the former. An education for democratic citizenship aims to develop three key abilities: critical thinking, the capacity to understand and to transcend parochial attachments, and empathy. An education for profit, however, requires (...)
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  9. Vasco D’Agnese (forthcoming). The Eclipse of Imagination Within Educational ‘Official’ Framework and Why It Should Be Returned to Educational Discourse: A Deweyan Perspective. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-20.
    In recent decades, the shift towards the “learnification” of educational discourse has de facto reframed educational purposes and schooling practice, thus reframing what students should know, strive for, and, in a sense, be. In this paper, given the efforts to disrupt the dominance of learning discourse, I seek to engage regarding a specific concern, namely, the progressive removal of imagination within educational official framework. Indeed, imagination has virtually disappeared from the documents, publications, web pages and recommendations of major educational agencies (...)
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  10. Amanda Fulford (forthcoming). Education: Expectation and the Unexpected. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-11.
    This paper considers concepts of expectation and responsibility, and how these drive dialogic interactions between tutor and student in an age of marketised Higher Education. In thinking about such interactions in terms of different forms of exchange, the paper considers the philosophy of Martin Buber and Emmanuel Levinas on dialogic intersubjectivity, and an ethics of responsibility. This enables a richer understanding of the tutorial dialogue in particular, as both teaching and encounter. This has significant implications for education and for the (...)
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  11. Adam J. Greteman (forthcoming). Corrupting Conversations with the Marquis de Sade: On Education, Gender, and Sexuality. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-16.
    In this essay, the author joins a conversation started by Martin regarding gender and education seeking to extend the conversation to address sexuality. To do so, the author brings a reading of the Marquis de Sade to challenge the emphasis on reproduction in education as it relates to gendered and sexual norms. The author, following Martin’s approach in Reclaiming the Conversation, reads one particular text of Sade’s—Philosophy in the Bedroom—to argue for queer possibilities that Sade brings to the conversation around (...)
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  12. Mary Healy (forthcoming). Should Children Have Best Friends? Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-13.
    An important theme in the philosophy of education community in recent years has been the way in which philosophy can be brought to illuminate and evaluate research findings from the landscape of policy and practice. Undoubtedly, some of these practices can be based on spurious evidence, yet have mostly been left unchallenged in both philosophical and educational circles. One of the newer practices creeping into schools is that of ‘No best friend’ policies. In some schools, this is interpreted as suggesting (...)
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  13.  1
    Igor Jasinski & Tyson E. Lewis (forthcoming). The Educational Community as In-Tentional Community. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-13.
    This paper reassesses a perennial concern of philosophy of education: the nature of the educational community and the role of the teacher in relation to such a community. As an entry point into this broader question, we turn to Philosophy for children, which has consistently emphasized the importance of community. Yet, not unlike pragmatist notions of community more broadly, the P4C community has largely focused on the goal-directed, purposive, aspect of the process of inquiry. The purpose of our paper is (...)
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  14.  2
    Yuval Jobani (forthcoming). The Secular University and Its Critics. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-19.
    Universities in the USA have become bastions of secularity in a distinctly religious society. As such, they are subjected to a variety of robust and rigorous religious critiques. In this paper I do not seek to engage in the debate between the supporters of the secular university and its opponents. Furthermore, I do not claim to summarize the history of the critique of the secular university, nor to present an exhaustive map of its current articulations. My purpose is rather more (...)
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  15. Anna Kouppanou (forthcoming). ‘…Einstein’s Most Rational Dimension of Noetic Life and the Teddy Bear…’ An Interview with Bernard Stiegler on Childhood, Education and the Digital‘. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-9.
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  16.  3
    Michelle Maiese (forthcoming). Transformative Learning, Enactivism, and Affectivity. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-20.
    Education theorists have emphasized that transformative learning is not simply a matter of students gaining access to new knowledge and information, but instead centers upon personal transformation: it alters students’ perspectives, interpretations, and responses. How should learning that brings about this sort of self-transformation be understood from the perspectives of philosophy of mind and cognitive science? Jack Mezirow has described transformative learning primarily in terms of critical reflection, meta-cognitive reasoning, and the questioning of assumptions and beliefs. And (...)
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  17.  1
    Yael Naot-Ofarim & Sonia Solomonic (forthcoming). Educational Polyphony. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-13.
    While much has been written about relativism, multiculturalism and dialogue the case of education is special as in education the teacher aims to promote a set of values. This role of the teacher as bearing a worldview to be advanced is rarely addressed in the literature and is the focus of this paper. In the first section we explore the concept of polyphony and the vision it presents for education. We then turn to the idea of dialogue as developed by (...)
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  18. M. A. Peters (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Legacy for Education Revisited. Studies in Philosophy and Education.
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  19. John Quay (forthcoming). From Human–Nature to Cultureplace in Education Via an Exploration of Unity and Relation in the Work of Peirce and Dewey. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-14.
    In outdoor education discourse the notion of relation is often employed to convey basic connections between humanity and nature as human–nature relationships, yet the sense of relation itself is rarely questioned. Drawing on the work of Peirce and Dewey, I explore the ramifications of a more nuanced understanding of relation, specifically how relation works with and within differing senses of unity. These ramifications have consequences for how we understand human–nature relationships, which I argue are better conveyed in terms of culture–place. (...)
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  20.  6
    Yam San Chee (forthcoming). Interrogating the Learning Sciences as a Design Science: Leveraging Insights From Chinese Philosophy and Chinese Medicine. Studies in Philosophy and Education.
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  21. Glen L. Sherman (forthcoming). Service Learning in Light of Emmanuel Levinas. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-16.
    Emmanuel Levinas, a twentieth century French Continental philosopher, proposed an original understanding of ethics which has serious implications for the particular activities within higher education designated as service learning and community service. First I will define service learning and community service and briefly review the theoretical and philosophical justifications typically employed to substantiate and ground these activities within higher education. Next, I will explicate key aspects from Levinas’ ethical philosophy important for reconceptualizing service learning, and discuss their significance for related (...)
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  22.  12
    Alexander M. Sidorkin (forthcoming). Campbell’s Law and the Ethics of Immensurability. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-12.
    The paper examines “Campbell’s Law”: “The more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision-making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it is intended to monitor.” The examination of measurability leads to explaining the reason for existence of a class of unmeasurable phenomena. The author describes a kind of habitus in which a strong taboo against measuring must exist by necessity, not by (...)
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  23. Geir Sigurðsson (forthcoming). Transformative Critique: What Confucianism Can Contribute to Contemporary Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-16.
    Critical thinking is currently much celebrated in the contemporary West and beyond, not least in higher education. Tertiary education students are generally expected to adopt a critical attitude in order to become responsible and constructive participants in the development of modern democratic society. Currently, the perceived desirability of critical thinking has even made it into a seemingly successful marketable commodity. A brief online search yields a vast number of books that are mostly presented as self-help manuals to enable readers to (...)
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  24. A. Stables (forthcoming). The Unnatural Nature of Nature and Nurture. Studies in Philosophy and Education.
     
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  25.  3
    Mar Rosàs Tosas (forthcoming). Educational Leadership Reconsidered: Arendt, Agamben, and Bauman. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-17.
    In this paper we claim educational leadership as an autonomous discipline whose goals and strategies should not mirror those typical of business and political leadership. In order to define the aims proper to educational leadership we question three common assumptions of what it is supposed to carry out. First, we turn to Hannah Arendt and her contemporary critics to maintain that education aims at opening up exceptions within the normal course of events rather than simply preserving it. This way, education (...)
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  26.  1
    Daniel Tröhler & Jürgen Oelkers (forthcoming). Historiography of Education: Philosophical Questions and Case Studies. Studies in Philosophy and Education.
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  27.  6
    Matt S. Whitt (forthcoming). Other People’s Problems: Student Distancing, Epistemic Responsibility, and Injustice. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-18.
    In classes that examine entrenched injustices like sexism or racism, students sometimes use “distancing strategies” to dissociate themselves from the injustice being studied. Education researchers argue that distancing is a mechanism through which students, especially students of apparent privilege, deny their complicity in systemic injustice. While I am sympathetic to this analysis, I argue that there is much at stake in student distancing that the current literature fails to recognize. On my view, distancing perpetuates socially sanctioned forms of ignorance and (...)
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  28. Ana Cristina Zimmermann & W. John Morgan (forthcoming). A Time for Silence? Its Possibilities for Dialogue and for Reflective Learning. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-15.
    From the beginning of history sounds have played a fundamentally important role in humanity’s development as ways of expression and of communication. However in contemporary western society, and indeed globally, we are experiencing an excess of speech and a relentless encouragement to expression. Such excess indicates a misunderstanding about what expression and dialogue should be. This condition encourages us to think about silence, solitude and contemplation and the role they might play in restoring the realm of personal understanding of the (...)
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