Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  21
    Ada S. Jaarsma, Kyle Kinaschuk & Lin Xing (forthcoming). Kierkegaard, Despair and the Possibility of Education: Teaching Existentialism Existentially. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-17.
    Written collaboratively by two undergraduate students and one professor, this article explores what it would mean to teach existentialism “existentially.” We conducted a survey of how Existentialism is currently taught in universities across North America, concluding that, while existentialism courses tend to resemble other undergraduate philosophy courses, existentialist texts challenge us to rethink conventional teaching practices. Looking to thinkers like Kierkegaard, Beauvoir and Arendt for insights into the nature of pedagogy, as well as recent work by Gert Biesta, we lay (...)
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  2.  2
    Clémentine Beauvais & Rupert Higham (forthcoming). A Reappraisal of Children’s ‘Potential’. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-15.
    What does it mean for a child to fulfil his or her potential? This article explores the contexts and implications of the much-used concept of potential in educational discourses. We claim that many of the popular, political and educational uses of the term in relation to childhood have a problematic blind spot: interpersonality, and the necessary coexistence for the concept to be receivable of all children’s ‘potentials’. Rather than advocating abandoning the term—a futile gesture given its emotive force—we argue that (...)
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  3.  4
    Kipton E. Jensen (forthcoming). Pedagogical Personalism at Morehouse College. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-19.
    This essay describes a visionary philosophy of education at Morehouse College. The educational process at Morehouse, construed here as a form of pedagogical personalism, is personified in three luminaries of Morehouse College: Benjamin Elijah Mays, Howard Washington Thurman, and Martin Luther King. The educational process at Morehouse should be interpreted as an ambivalent response to segregation and discrimination in Jim Crow America. Like all black institutions in the South, Morehouse was subject to racist constraints; Morehouse was created and existed in (...)
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  4.  4
    Stephen Boulter (forthcoming). Education From a Biological Point of View. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-16.
    There appears to be an irresolvable disagreement between “progressives” and “conservatives” regarding the ultimate aims of education. This paper argues that the dispute is irresolvable as it currently stands because the traditional progressive/conservative dichotomies are false and based on distorted half-truths. The current impasse is due to the fact that educationalists and philosophers alike have hitherto misunderstood the fundamental purpose of educational activities. The central claim of this paper is that a biological perspective on education allows one to see past (...)
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  5.  1
    Johan Dahlbeck (forthcoming). A Spinozistic Model of Moral Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-18.
    Spinoza’s claim that self-preservation is the foundation of virtue makes for the point of departure of this philosophical investigation into what a Spinozistic model of moral education might look like. It is argued that Spinoza’s metaphysics places constraints on moral education insofar as an educational account would be affected by Spinoza’s denial of the objectivity of moral knowledge, his denial of the existence of free will, and of moral responsibility. This article discusses these challenges in some detail, seeking to construe (...)
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  6.  1
    Sarah J. DesRoches (forthcoming). An Education of Shared Fates: Recasting Citizenship Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-13.
    In this paper I explore how citizenship education might position students as always/everywhere political to diminish the pervasive belief that one either is or is not a “political person.” By focusing on how liberal and radical democracy are both necessary frameworks for engaging with issues of power, I address how we might reframe citizenship education to highlight the ubiquity of politics, offering a deepened sense of democracy. This reframing of citizenship education entails highlighting how liberalism and radical democracy are mutually (...)
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  7.  4
    Vasco D’Agnese (forthcoming). The Eclipse of Imagination Within Educational ‘Official’ Framework and Why It Should Be Returned to Educational Discourse: A Deweyan Perspective. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-20.
    In recent decades, the shift towards the “learnification” of educational discourse has de facto reframed educational purposes and schooling practice, thus reframing what students should know, strive for, and, in a sense, be. In this paper, given the efforts to disrupt the dominance of learning discourse, I seek to engage regarding a specific concern, namely, the progressive removal of imagination within educational official framework. Indeed, imagination has virtually disappeared from the documents, publications, web pages and recommendations of major educational agencies (...)
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  8.  2
    Juan Espindola (forthcoming). Why Historical Injustice Must Be Taught in Schools. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-12.
    In societies that have failed to confront past injustice, the most common justifications for the inclusion of history education within the school curriculum invoke the idea that those who cannot learn from the past are doomed to repeat it; or they appeal to goals such as reconciliation, or to the importance of recognizing and morally redressing the harm done to victims. These justifications are all sound and important. However, they must be supplemented with a justification of a different kind, one (...)
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  9.  1
    Howard Gibson & Darren Garside (forthcoming). The Undergraduate Education Studies Dissertation: Philosophical Reflections Upon Tacit Empiricism in Textbook Guidance and the Latent Capacity of Argumentation. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-16.
    The final-year undergraduate dissertation is commonplace in Education Studies programmes across the world and yet its philosophical assumptions are complex and not always questioned. In England there is evidence to suggest a tacit preference for empiricism in textbooks designed to support early researchers. This brings, we suggest, problems associated with dualism, instrumentalism and of accounting for value, redolent of the dilemmas that emerge from Hume’s empiricist epistemology. The paper suggests that if argumentation were explicitly taught to undergraduates it may help (...)
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  10.  1
    Brian R. Gilbert (forthcoming). Review of Tony Wall and David Perrin: Slavoj Žižek: A Žižekian Gaze at Education. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-7.
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  11.  2
    Adam J. Greteman (forthcoming). Corrupting Conversations with the Marquis de Sade: On Education, Gender, and Sexuality. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-16.
    In this essay, the author joins a conversation started by Martin regarding gender and education seeking to extend the conversation to address sexuality. To do so, the author brings a reading of the Marquis de Sade to challenge the emphasis on reproduction in education as it relates to gendered and sexual norms. The author, following Martin’s approach in Reclaiming the Conversation, reads one particular text of Sade’s—Philosophy in the Bedroom—to argue for queer possibilities that Sade brings to the conversation around (...)
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  12.  3
    Mary Healy (forthcoming). Should Children Have Best Friends? Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-13.
    An important theme in the philosophy of education community in recent years has been the way in which philosophy can be brought to illuminate and evaluate research findings from the landscape of policy and practice. Undoubtedly, some of these practices can be based on spurious evidence, yet have mostly been left unchallenged in both philosophical and educational circles. One of the newer practices creeping into schools is that of ‘No best friend’ policies. In some schools, this is interpreted as suggesting (...)
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  13.  2
    David Kennedy (forthcoming). Anarchism, Schooling, and Democratic Sensibility. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-18.
    This paper seeks to address the question of schooling for democracy by, first, identifying at least one form of social character, dependent, after Marcuse, on the historical emergence of a “new sensibility.” It then explores one pedagogical thread related to the emergence of this form of subjectivity over the course of the last two centuries in the west, and traces its influence in the educational counter-tradition associated with philosophical anarchism, which is based on principles of dialogue and social reconstruction as (...)
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  14.  2
    Tyson E. Lewis (forthcoming). Review of Samuel D. Rocha, Folk Phenomenology: Education, Study, and the Human Person. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-5.
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  15.  6
    Michelle Maiese (forthcoming). Transformative Learning, Enactivism, and Affectivity. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-20.
    Education theorists have emphasized that transformative learning is not simply a matter of students gaining access to new knowledge and information, but instead centers upon personal transformation: it alters students’ perspectives, interpretations, and responses. How should learning that brings about this sort of self-transformation be understood from the perspectives of philosophy of mind and cognitive science? Jack Mezirow has described transformative learning primarily in terms of critical reflection, meta-cognitive reasoning, and the questioning of assumptions and beliefs. And within mainstream philosophy (...)
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  16.  2
    Alin Olteanu, Maria Kambouri & Andrew Stables (forthcoming). Predicating From an Early Age: Edusemiotics and the Potential of Children’s Preconceptions. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-20.
    This paper aims to explain how semiotics and constructivism can collaborate in an educational epistemology by developing a joint approach to prescientific conceptions. Empirical data and findings of constructivist research are interpreted in the light of Peirce’s semiotics. Peirce’s semiotics is an anti-psychologistic logic and relational logic. Constructivism was traditionally developed within psychology and sociology and, therefore, some incompatibilities can be expected between these two schools. While acknowledging the differences, we explain that constructivism and semiotics share the assumption of realism (...)
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  17. M. A. Peters (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Legacy for Education Revisited. Studies in Philosophy and Education.
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  18.  3
    John Quay (forthcoming). From Human–Nature to Cultureplace in Education Via an Exploration of Unity and Relation in the Work of Peirce and Dewey. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-14.
    In outdoor education discourse the notion of relation is often employed to convey basic connections between humanity and nature as human–nature relationships, yet the sense of relation itself is rarely questioned. Drawing on the work of Peirce and Dewey, I explore the ramifications of a more nuanced understanding of relation, specifically how relation works with and within differing senses of unity. These ramifications have consequences for how we understand human–nature relationships, which I argue are better conveyed in terms of culture–place. (...)
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  19.  2
    Samuel D. Rocha (forthcoming). Reply to Lewis: Must Poetry Be Poetic? Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-2.
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  20.  3
    Antti Saari (forthcoming). Knowledge Without Contexts? A Foucauldian Analysis of E.L. Thorndike’s Positivist Educational Research. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-15.
    The article discusses the allegedly decontextualized and ahistorical traits in positivist educational research and curriculum by examining its emergence in early twentieth-century empirical education. Edward Lee Thorndike’s educational psychology is analyzed as a case in point. It will be shown that Thorndike’s positivist educational psychology stressed the need to account for the reality of schooling and to produce knowledge of the actual contexts of education. Furthermore, a historical analysis informed by Michel Foucault’s history of the human sciences reveals that there (...)
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  21.  7
    Yam San Chee (forthcoming). Interrogating the Learning Sciences as a Design Science: Leveraging Insights From Chinese Philosophy and Chinese Medicine. Studies in Philosophy and Education.
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  22.  4
    Geir Sigurðsson (forthcoming). Transformative Critique: What Confucianism Can Contribute to Contemporary Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-16.
    Critical thinking is currently much celebrated in the contemporary West and beyond, not least in higher education. Tertiary education students are generally expected to adopt a critical attitude in order to become responsible and constructive participants in the development of modern democratic society. Currently, the perceived desirability of critical thinking has even made it into a seemingly successful marketable commodity. A brief online search yields a vast number of books that are mostly presented as self-help manuals to enable readers to (...)
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  23. A. Stables (forthcoming). The Unnatural Nature of Nature and Nurture. Studies in Philosophy and Education.
     
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  24.  2
    Steven A. Stolz (forthcoming). Nietzsche on Aesthetics, Educators and Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-13.
    This essay argues that much can be gained from a close examination of Nietzsche’s work with respect to education. In order to contextualise my argument, I provide a brief critique of Nietzsche’s thinking on aesthetics, educators and education. I then turn my attention to the work of Thus Spoke Zarathustra, the figures Zarathustra and the Übermensch, and other Nietzschean works with a view to outline what I mean by a Nietzschean education. My central thesis being that a Nietzschean education is (...)
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  25.  2
    Ernst D. Thoutenhoofd (forthcoming). New Techniques of Difference: On Data as School Pupils. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-16.
    Pupils—the learners of both educational thought and of educational practice—exist ever more as data, as do the strictures and goals through which these pupils are pedagogically managed. I elaborate this thought by way of a single example: a particular kind of pupils whose number is reportedly on the increase, namely pupils diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In my analysis I combine Hacking’s nominalist conception of human kinds and Weber’s instrumental rationalism with recent thinking about the effects of digital technologies (...)
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  26.  2
    Daniel Tröhler & Jürgen Oelkers (forthcoming). Historiography of Education: Philosophical Questions and Case Studies. Studies in Philosophy and Education.
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  27.  9
    Rachel Wahl (forthcoming). What Can Be Known and How People Grow: The Philosophical Stakes of the Assessment Debate. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-17.
    Fierce debates over standardized assessments in teacher preparation have revolved around flaws in implementation and the politics of privatization. While important, this focus obscures the philosophical divide between proponents and opponents of standardized assessments. This article examines how faculty in New York State argue for and against a controversial performance assessment for teacher candidates, the edTPA. Revealing the distinctive ways that teacher educators on opposing sides of this debate understand the nature of knowledge, human development, professionalism, and social justice clarifies (...)
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  28.  1
    Tony Wall (forthcoming). Author Response: Provocative Education: From The Dalai Lama’s Cat ® to Dismal Land ®. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-5.
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  29.  1
    Jinting Wu & Mario Wenning (forthcoming). The Postsecular Turn in Education: Lessons From the Mindfulness Movement and the Revival of Confucian Academies. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-21.
    It is part of a global trend today that new relationships are being forged between religion and society, between spirituality and materiality, giving rise to announcements that we live in a ‘postsecular’ or ‘desecularized’ world. Taking up two educational movements, the mindfulness movement in the West and the revival of Confucian education in China, this paper examines what and how postsecular orientations and sensibilities penetrate educational discourses and practices in different cultural contexts. We compare the two movements to reveal a (...)
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