Year:

  1. Elisa Aaltola (2016). Wilderness Experiences as Ethics: From Elevation to Attentiveness. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):283-300.
    Wilderness experiences were celebrated by the Great Romantics, and figures such as Wordsworth and Thoreau emphasized the need to seek direct contact with the non-human world. Later deep ecologists accentuated the way in which wilderness experiences can spark moral epiphanies and lead to action on behalf of the natural environment. In recent years, psychological studies have manifested how the observations made by the Romantics, nature authors and deep ecologists apply to laypeople: contact with the wilderness does tend to lead to (...)
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  2.  6
    Richard Christian (2016). Nature’s Legacy: On Rohwer and Marris and Genomic Conservation. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):265-267.
    Rohwer & Marris claim that “many conservation biologists” believe that there is a prima facie duty to preserve the genetic integrity of species. (A prima facie duty is a necessary pro tanto moral reason.) They describe three possible arguments for that belief and reject them all. They conclude that the biologists they cite are mistaken, and that there is no such duty: duties to preserve genetic integrity are merely instrumental: we ought act to preserve genetic integrity only because doing so (...)
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  3.  1
    Shlomo Cohen (2016). Genetic Integrity, Authenticity, and Aesthetic Worth. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):271-274.
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  4.  3
    Miranda del Corral (2016). Respect, Protection and Restoration: Preservation as a Negative or a Positive Duty. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):268-270.
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  5.  5
    Martin Drenthen (2016). The Return of the Wild in the Anthropocene. Wolf Resurgence in the Netherlands. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):318-337.
    In most rewilding projects, humans are still the agents in control: it is us who decide to no longer want to fully control nature. Spontaneous rewilding changes the nature of this game. Once we are confronted with species that have their own agency, that cannot fully be controlled, and that behave in ways that we do not always like, then it proves hard to co-exist and tolerate nature’s autonomy. Nowhere is this more clearly visible than with the resurging wolf, whose (...)
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  6.  1
    Laura García-Portela (2016). Political Responsibility Refocused: Thinking Justice After Iris Marion Young. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):351-354.
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  7.  1
    Simon P. James (2016). Cultural Ecosystem Services: A Critical Assessment. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):338-350.
    This paper is about the practice of evaluating ecosystems on the basis of the cultural services they provide. My first aim is to assess the various objections that have been made to this practice. My second is to argue that when particular places are integral to people’s lives, their value cannot be adequately conceived in terms of the provision of cultural ecosystem services. It follows, I conclude, that the ecosystem services framework can provide only a very limited account of the (...)
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  8.  4
    Kevin Meeker (2016). Genetic Integrity and the Very Idea of a Prima Facie Duty. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):256-258.
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  9.  11
    Roberta L. Millstein (2016). Re-Examining the Darwinian Basis for Aldo Leopold’s Land Ethic. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):301-317.
    Many philosophers have become familiar with Leopold’s <span class='Hi'>land</span> ethic through the writings of J. Baird Callicott, who claims that Leopold bases his <span class='Hi'>land</span> ethic on a ‘protosociobiological’ argument that Darwin gives in the Descent of Man. On this view, which has become the canonical interpretation, Leopold’s <span class='Hi'>land</span> ethic is based on extending our moral sentiments to ecosystems. I argue that the evidence weighs in favor of an alternative interpretation of Leopold; his reference to Darwin does not refer (...)
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  10.  1
    David M. Peña-Guzmán, G. K. D. Peña-Guzmán & Albrecht Schulte-Hostedde (2016). Genetic Integrity, Conservation Biology and the Ethics of Non-Intervention. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):259-261.
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  11.  1
    Yasha Rohwer & Emma Marris (2016). Is There a Prima Facie Duty to Preserve Genetic Integrity in Conservation Biology? Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):233-247.
    Some conservation biologists invoke the concept of ‘genetic integrity,’ which they generally assume is a good worth preserving without explicit justification. We examine the question of whether or not there is a prima facie duty to preserve genetic integrity in conservation biology. We examine several possible justifications for the potential duty found in the conservation biology literature. We argue, contra a dominant trend of thought in conservation biology, that there is no prima facie duty to preserve genetic integrity and that (...)
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  12.  3
    Per Sandin (2016). The Profession and the Killer App, or What Environmental Ethicists Might Learn From Bioethics: A Commentary. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):275-282.
    In terms of output in the form of published work and attraction of resources, bioethics seems to be a more vibrant field than environmental ethics. In this commentary it is argued that bioethics is, in some respect, less humanistic than environmental ethics and that two factors––bioethics’ strong connection to a profession, and its access to an intellectual ‘killer app’––offer ways in which environmental ethicists might learn from the ‘success story’ of bioethics.
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  13.  4
    Attila Tanyi (2016). On the Intrinsic Value of Genetic Integrity. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):248-251.
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  14.  2
    Jennifer Welchman (2016). ‘Attack of the Hybrid Swarm?’. Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):252-255.
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