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Forthcoming articles
  1.  4
    Ben Dixon (forthcoming). Deriving Moral Considerability From Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac. Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-17.
    I argue that a reasonable understanding of Leopold’s ‘Land Ethic’ is one that identifies possession of health as being a sufficient condition for moral consideration. With this, Leopold extends morality not only to biotic wholes, but to individual organisms, as both can have their health undermined. My argument centers on explaining why Leopold thinks it reasonable to analogize ecosystems both to an organism and to a community: both have a health. My conclusions undermine J. Baird Callicott’s rhetorical dismissal of the (...)
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  2. Robert K. Garcia & Jonathan Newman (forthcoming). Is It Possible to Care for Ecosystems? Policy Paralysis and Ecosystem Management. Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    Conservationists have two (non-mutually exclusive) types of arguments for why we should conserve ecosystems, instrumental and intrinsic value arguments. Instrumental arguments contend that we ought to conserve ecosystems because of the benefits that humans, or other morally relevant individuals, derive from ecosystems. Conservationists are often loath to rely too heavily on the instrumental argument because it could potentially force them to admit that some ecosystems are not at all useful to humans, or that if they are, they are not more (...)
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  3. Christian Baatz (forthcoming). Reply to My Critics: Justifying the Fair Share Argument. Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-9.
    In an earlier article I argued that individuals are obligated not to exceed their fair share of emissions entitlements, that many exceed their fair share at present and thus ought to reduce their emissions as far as can reasonably be demanded. The peer commentators raised various insightful and pressing concerns, but the following objections seem particularly important: It was argued that the fair share argument is insufficiently justified, that it is incoherent, that it would result in more far-reaching duties than (...)
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  4.  1
    Natalie Blanton (forthcoming). Total Liberation: The Power and Promise of Animal Rights and the Radical Earth Movement. Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-3.
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  5.  7
    Thom Brooks (forthcoming). How Not to Save the Planet. Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-17.
    Climate change presents us with perhaps the most pressing challenge today. But is it a problem we can solve? This article argues that existing conservationist and adaptation approaches fail to satisfy their objectives. A second issue that these approaches disagree about how best to end climate change, but accept that it is a problem that can be solved. I believe this view is mistaken: a future environmental catastrophe is an event we might at best postpone, but not avoid. This raises (...)
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  6.  2
    Francesco Carpanini (forthcoming). Environmental Ethics: From Theory to Practice. Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-2.
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  7.  2
    Alexander Lee & Jordan Kincaid (forthcoming). Two Problems of Climate Ethics: Can We Lose the Planet but Save Ourselves? Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-4.
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  8.  2
    Clement Loo (forthcoming). Environmental Justice as a Foundation for a Process-Based Framework for Adaptation and Mitigation: A Commentary on Brooks. Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-5.
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  9. Ben Mylius (forthcoming). Change-Oriented Conceptions of Climate: A Response to Thom Brooks’ How Not to Save the Planet. Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-3.
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  10.  2
    Duncan Purves (forthcoming). The Case for Discounting the Future. Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-18.
    Though economists appear to discount future well-being when evaluating the costs of climate change, plausible justifications of this practice have not been forthcoming. The methods of economists thus seem to contravene the requirements of justice by discounting the moral importance of future well-being simply because it exists in the future. I defend the practice of discounting the future against the charge of injustice on grounds that moral theorists of different stripes can accept. I argue that, because public policy choices are (...)
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  11. Jonathan Peter Schwartz (forthcoming). On Staying Focused: Response to Thom Brooks’ How Not To Save the Planet. Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-3.
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  12.  2
    Dan C. Shahar (forthcoming). Treading Lightly on the Climate in a Problem-Ridden World. Ethics, Policy and Environment:1-13.
    ABSTRACTPersonal carbon footprints have become a subject of major concern among those who worry about global climate change. Conventional wisdom holds that individuals have a duty to reduce their impacts on the climate system by restricting their carbon footprints. However, I defend a new argument for thinking that this conventional wisdom is mistaken. Individuals, I argue, have a duty to take actions to combat the world’s problems. But since climate change is only one of a nearly endless list of such (...)
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