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Forthcoming articles
  1. John Danaher (forthcoming). The Threat of Algocracy: Reality, Resistance and Accommodation. Philosophy and Technology:1-24.
    One of the most noticeable trends in recent years has been the increasing reliance of public decision-making processes (bureaucratic, legislative and legal) on algorithms, i.e. computer programmed step-by-step instructions for taking a given set of inputs and producing an output. The question raised by this article is whether the rise of such algorithmic governance creates problems for the moral or political legitimacy of our public decision-making processes. Ignoring common concerns with data protection and privacy, it is argued that algorithm-driven decision-making (...)
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  2.  6
    Andrew Iliadis, Nandita Biswas Mellamphy, Jean-Hugues Barthélémy, Marc J. De Vries & Nathalie Simondon (forthcoming). Book Symposium on Le Concept D’Information Dans la Science Contemporaine. Philosophy and Technology:1-23.
  3.  6
    Dennis Broeders (forthcoming). The Secret in the Information Society. Philosophy and Technology:1-13.
    Who can still keep a secret in a world in which everyone and everything are connected by technology aimed at charting and cross-referencing people, objects, movements, behaviour, relationships, tastes and preferences? The possibilities to keep a secret have come under severe pressure in the information age. That goes for the individual as well as the state. This development merits attention as secrecy is foundational for individual freedom as well as essential to the functioning of the state. Building on Simmel’s work (...)
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  4.  5
    Henry Dicks (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Biomimicry. Philosophy and Technology:1-21.
    The philosophy of biomimicry, I argue, consists of four main areas of inquiry. The first, which has already been explored by Freya Mathews, concerns the “deep” question of what Nature ultimately is. The second, third, and fourth areas correspond to the three basic principles of biomimicry as laid out by Janine Benyus. “Nature as model” is the poetic principle of biomimicry, for it tells us how it is that things are to be “brought forth”. “Nature as measure” is the ethical (...)
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  5.  3
    Luciano Floridi (forthcoming). On Human Dignity as a Foundation for the Right to Privacy. Philosophy and Technology:1-6.
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  6.  3
    Jan Kyrre Berg Friis (forthcoming). Measure and the Measureless. Philosophy and Technology.
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  7. Jan Kyrre Berg Friis (forthcoming). Interpreting the Visual. Philosophy and Technology.
     
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  8.  2
    Maša Galič, Tjerk Timan & Bert-Jaap Koops (forthcoming). Bentham, Deleuze and Beyond: An Overview of Surveillance Theories From the Panopticon to Participation. Philosophy and Technology:1-29.
    This paper aims to provide an overview of surveillance theories and concepts that can help to understand and debate surveillance in its many forms. As scholars from an increasingly wide range of disciplines are discussing surveillance, this literature review can offer much-needed common ground for the debate. We structure surveillance theory in three roughly chronological/thematic phases. The first two conceptualise surveillance through comprehensive theoretical frameworks which are elaborated in the third phase. The first phase, featuring Bentham and Foucault, offers architectural (...)
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  9.  2
    Katerina Hadjimatheou (forthcoming). Surveillance Technologies, Wrongful Criminalisation, and the Presumption of Innocence. Philosophy and Technology:1-16.
    The potential of surveillance practices to undermine the presumption of innocence is a growing concern amongst critics of surveillance. This paper attempts to assess the impact of surveillance on the presumption of innocence. It defends an account of the presumption of innocence as a protection against wrongful criminalisation against alternatives, and considers both the ways in which surveillance might undermine that protection and the—hitherto overlooked—ways in which it might promote it. It draws on empirical work on the causes of erroneous (...)
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  10. Sune Hannibal Holm (forthcoming). Synthetic Biology and Biological Interests. Philosophy and Technology.
     
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  11.  5
    Karim Jebari (forthcoming). Should Extinction Be Forever? Philosophy and Technology:1-12.
    This article will explore a problem which is related to our moral obligations towards species. Although the re-creation of extinct animals has been discussed to some degree both in lay deliberations as well as by scientists, advocates tend to emphasize the technological and scientific value of such an endeavour, and the “coolness” factor, 32–33, 2013). This article will provide an argument in favour of re-creation based on normative considerations. The environmentalist community generally accepts that it is wrong to exterminate species, (...)
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  12.  16
    Michael Stephen Lopato (forthcoming). Social Media, Love, and Sartre’s Look of the Other: Why Online Communication Is Not Fulfilling. Philosophy and Technology:1-16.
    We live in a world which is more connected than ever before. We can now send messages to a friend or colleague with a touch of a button, can learn about other’s interests before we even meet them, and now leave a digital trail behind us—whether we intend to or not. One question which, in proportion to its importance, has been asked quite infrequently since the dawn of the Internet era involves exactly how meaningful all of these connections are. To (...)
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  13.  1
    Tamar Sharon (forthcoming). Self-Tracking for Health and the Quantified Self: Re-Articulating Autonomy, Solidarity, and Authenticity in an Age of Personalized Healthcare. Philosophy and Technology:1-29.
    Self-tracking devices point to a future in which individuals will be more involved in the management of their health and will generate data that will benefit clinical decision making and research. They have thus attracted enthusiasm from medical and public health professionals as key players in the move toward participatory and personalized healthcare. Critics, however, have begun to articulate a number of broader societal and ethical concerns regarding self-tracking, foregrounding their disciplining, and disempowering effects. This paper has two aims: first, (...)
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  14.  1
    Daniel Trottier (forthcoming). Digital Vigilantism as Weaponisation of Visibility. Philosophy and Technology:1-18.
    This paper considers an emerging practice whereby citizen’s use of ubiquitous and domesticated technologies enable a parallel form of criminal justice. Here, weaponised visibility supersedes police intervention as an appropriate response. Digital vigilantism is a user-led violation of privacy that not only transcends online/offline distinctions but also complicates relations of visibility and control between police and the public. This paper develops a theoretically nuanced and empirically grounded understanding of digital vigilantism in order to advance a research agenda in (...)
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  15.  2
    Jochem Zwier, Vincent Blok & Pieter Lemmens (forthcoming). Phenomenology and the Empirical Turn: A Phenomenological Analysis of Postphenomenology. Philosophy and Technology:1-21.
    This paper provides a phenomenological analysis of postphenomenological philosophy of technology. While acknowledging that the results of its analyses are to be recognized as original, insightful, and valuable, we will argue that in its execution of the empirical turn, postphenomenology forfeits a phenomenological dimension of questioning. By contrasting the postphenomenological method with Heidegger’s understanding of phenomenology as developed in his early Freiburg lectures and in Being and Time, we will show how the postphenomenological method must be understood as mediation theory, (...)
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