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Forthcoming articles
  1.  4 DLs
    Dominic Smith (forthcoming). Rewriting the Constitution: A Critique of 'Postphenomenology'. Philosophy and Technology:1-19.
    This paper builds a three-part argument in favour of a more transcendentally focused form of ‘postphenomenology’ than is currently practised in philosophy of technology. It does so by problematising two key terms, ‘constitution’ and ‘postphenomenology’, then by arguing in favour of a ‘transcendental empiricist’ approach that draws on the work of Foucault, Derrida, and, in particular, Deleuze. Part one examines ‘constitution’, as it moves from the context of Husserl’s phenomenology to Ihde and Verbeek’s ‘postphenomenology’. I argue that the term tends (...)
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  2.  4 DLs
    Sadjad Soltanzadeh (forthcoming). Questioning Two Assumptions in the Metaphysics of Technological Objects. Philosophy and Technology:1-9.
    There are at least two assumptions which, except for very few occasions, have not been discussed by philosophers who have written on the metaphysics of technological objects. The first assumption is that to be a technology is an absolute matter and that all technological objects are equally technological. The second assumption is that the property of being technological is abstracted from existing things which happen to have this property in common. I appeal to the definition of technological objects as problem-solving (...)
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  3.  5 DLs
    Litska Strikwerda (forthcoming). Present and Future Instances of Virtual Rape in Light of Three Categories of Legal Philosophical Theories on Rape. Philosophy and Technology:1-20.
    This paper is about the question of whether or not virtual rape should be considered a crime under current law. A virtual rape is the rape of an avatar (a person’s virtual representation) in a virtual world. In the future, possibilities for virtual rape of a person him- or herself will arise in virtual reality environments involving a haptic device or robotics. As the title indicates, I will study both these present and future instances of virtual rape in light of (...)
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  4.  12 DLs
    William Bülow & Cathrine Felix (forthcoming). On Friendship Between Online Equals. Philosophy and Technology:1-14.
    There is an ongoing debate about the value of virtual friendship. In contrast to previous authorships, this paper argues that virtual friendship can have independent value. It is argued that within an Aristotelian framework, some friendships that are perhaps impossible offline can exist online, i.e., some offline unequals can be online equals and thus form online friendships of independent value.
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  5.  2 DLs
    Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Michael Hauskeller, Sandra Braman, Xavier Guchet & Tamar Sharon (forthcoming). Book Symposium on Human Nature in an Age of Biotechnology: The Case for Mediated Posthumanism By Tamar Sharon Springer, Dordrecht, 2014. Philosophy and Technology:1-19.
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  6.  2 DLs
    Jan Kyrre Berg Friis (forthcoming). Measure and the Measureless. Philosophy and Technology.
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  7.  2 DLs
    Jan Kyrre Berg Friis (forthcoming). Interpreting the Visual. Philosophy and Technology.
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  8.  4 DLs
    Donald Gillies (forthcoming). Technological Origins of the Einsteinian Revolution. Philosophy and Technology:1-30.
    The Einsteinian revolution, which began around 1905, was one of the most remarkable in the history of physics. It replaced Newtonian mechanics, which had been accepted as completely correct for nearly 200 years, by the special and general theories of relativity. It also eliminated the aether, which had dominated physics throughout the nineteenth century. This paper poses the question of why this momentous scientific revolution began. The suggested answer is in terms of the remarkable series of discoveries and inventions which (...)
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  9.  1 DLs
    Ejvind Hansen (forthcoming). Hackers in Hiding: A Foucaultian Analysis. Philosophy and Technology:1-15.
    On several occasions Michel Foucault advocated a methodological turn towards what he called a ‘happy positivism’. Foucault’s emphasis on the surface does not deny the importance of structures of hiding, but understands it as a game in which the structures of hiding are viewed as contingently given. In this paper, I will analyse the conflict between the hacker movement and the field of corporate interests. I argue that the introduction of graphical user interfaces and the maintaining of copyright interests are (...)
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  10.  7 DLs
    Stephen Hetherington (forthcoming). Technological Knowledge-That As Knowledge-How: A Comment. Philosophy and Technology:1-6.
    Norström has argued that contemporary epistemological debates about the conceptual relations between knowledge-that and knowledge-how need to be supplemented by a concept of technological knowledge—with this being a further kind of knowledge. But this paper argues that Norström has not shown why technological knowledge-that is so distinctive because Norström has not shown that such knowledge cannot be reduced conceptually to a form of knowledge-how. The paper thus applies practicalism to the case of technological knowledge-that. Indeed, the paper shows why Norström’s (...)
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  11.  4 DLs
    Robin K. Hill (forthcoming). What an Algorithm Is. Philosophy and Technology:1-25.
    The algorithm, a building block of computer science, is defined from an intuitive and pragmatic point of view, through a methodological lens of philosophy rather than that of formal computation. The treatment extracts properties of abstraction, control, structure, finiteness, effective mechanism, and imperativity, and intentional aspects of goal and preconditions. The focus on the algorithm as a robust conceptual object obviates issues of correctness and minimality. Neither the articulation of an algorithm nor the dynamic process constitute the algorithm itself. Analysis (...)
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  12.  2 DLs
    Sune Hannibal Holm (forthcoming). Synthetic Biology and Biological Interests. Philosophy and Technology.
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  13.  2 DLs
    Andrew Iliadis, Nandita Biswas Mellamphy, Jean-Hugues Barthélémy, Marc J. De Vries & Nathalie Simondon (forthcoming). Book Symposium on Le Concept D’Information Dans la Science Contemporaine. Philosophy and Technology:1-23.
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  14.  0 DLs
    Michael Stephen Lopato (forthcoming). Social Media, Love, and Sartre’s Look of the Other: Why Online Communication Is Not Fulfilling. Philosophy and Technology:1-16.
    We live in a world which is more connected than ever before. We can now send messages to a friend or colleague with a touch of a button, can learn about other’s interests before we even meet them, and now leave a digital trail behind us—whether we intend to or not. One question which, in proportion to its importance, has been asked quite infrequently since the dawn of the Internet era involves exactly how meaningful all of these connections are. To (...)
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  15.  1 DLs
    Morgan Luck (forthcoming). Against Norström’s Argument for Technological Knowing How Not Being an Instance of Knowing That. Philosophy and Technology:1-7.
    In this paper, I evaluate an argument offered by Per Norström in section 8 of his paper Knowing how, knowing that, knowing technology. The argument is for the proposition that some instance of knowing how is not an instance of knowing that; the instance in question being one of technological know-how. This conclusion contradicts Stanley and Williamson’s proposal that all instances of knowing how are instances of knowing that. I provide reason to think that there are problems with Norström’s argument.
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  16.  8 DLs
    Per Norström (forthcoming). Knowing How, Knowing That, Knowing Technology. Philosophy and Technology:1-13.
    A wide variety of skills, abilities and knowledge are used in technological activities such as engineering design. Together, they enable problem solving and artefact creation. Gilbert Ryle’s division of knowledge into knowing how and knowing that is often referred to when discussing this technological knowledge. Ryle’s view has been questioned and criticised by those who claim that there is only one type, for instance, Jason Stanley and Timothy Williamson who claim that knowing how is really a form of knowing that (...)
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  17.  1 DLs
    Wolfgang Pietsch (forthcoming). The Causal Nature of Modeling with Big Data. Philosophy and Technology:1-35.
    I argue for the causal character of modeling in data-intensive science, contrary to widespread claims that big data is only concerned with the search for correlations. After discussing the concept of data-intensive science and introducing two examples as illustration, several algorithms are examined. It is shown how they are able to identify causal relevance on the basis of eliminative induction and a related difference-making account of causation. I then situate data-intensive modeling within a broader framework of an epistemology of scientific (...)
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  18.  3 DLs
    Steffen Steinert (forthcoming). Taking Stock of Extension Theory of Technology. Philosophy and Technology:1-18.
    In this paper, I will focus on the extension theories of technology. I will identify four influential positions that have been put forward: technology as an extension of the human organism, technology as an extension of the lived body and the senses, technology as an extension of our intentions and desires, and technology as an extension of our faculties and capabilities. I will describe and critically assess these positions one by one and highlight their advantages and their shortcomings and limitations. (...)
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  19.  6 DLs
    Dingmar van Eck (forthcoming). Validating Function-Based Design Methods: An Explanationist Perspective. Philosophy and Technology:1-21.
    Analysis of the adequacy of engineering design methods, as well as analysis of the utility of concepts of function often invoked in these methods, is a neglected topic in both philosophy of technology and in engineering proper. In this paper, I present an approach—dubbed an explanationist perspective—for assessing the adequacy of function-based design methods. Engineering design is often intertwined with explanation, for instance, in reverse engineering and subsequent redesign, knowledge base-assisted designing, and diagnostic reasoning. I argue that the presented approach (...)
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  20.  3 DLs
    Pak-Hang Wong (forthcoming). Consenting to Geoengineering. Philosophy and Technology:1-16.
    Researchers have explored questions concerning public participation and consent in geoengineering governance. Yet, the notion of consent has received little attention from researchers, and it is rarely discussed explicitly, despite being prescribed as a normative requirement for geoengineering research and being used in rejecting some geoengineering options. As it is noted in the leading geoengineering governance principles, i.e. the Oxford Principles, there are different conceptions of consent; the idea of consent ought to be unpacked more carefully if, and when, we (...)
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