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  1. Charles Altiei (2013). Aesthetics of Affects. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 8 (19):48-53.
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  2. Mamikon Asatryan (2013). The Key to the Economic and Socio-Political Fallacies of Marxism. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 8 (19):11-21.
    The defeat of the USSR and of the world system of socialism, which was of a world-wide significance, raised a key question of its underlying causes. As an answer to that question, it is shown that the defeat was by no way accidental as it was brought forth not only because of mistakes in the application of Marxism but also of significant economic and socio-political fallacies. The key is in the fallacies, which are hidden deeply inside the methodology of Marxism (...)
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  3. Rockwell F. Clancy (2013). Complicating the Dualisms: History Versus Becoming. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 8 (19):55-57.
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  4. John F. DeCarlo (2013). Introduction. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 8 (19):22-32.
    Busting the Hermenuetical Ghosts: Steering clear of pre-modern, Romantic, Freudian, and post-modern readings, DeCarlo asserts how Shakespeare's Hamlet text foreshadows the modern philosophical thought of Descartes, Kant, and Heidegger, particularly in regard to the intellectual issues of thought and doubt, time and action, and being and death.
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  5. Heidi L. Pennington (2013). But Why Must Readers Be Made to Feel... Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 8 (19):33-47.
    In this article, I investigate the ethical potential of Victorian literature that markedly discourages readerly sympathy with the protagonists. Generating sympathy for fictional characters was, and often still is, considered to be the primary way in which the novel promotes ethical thoughts, feelings, and behavior in readers. For this reason, the ethical prospects of novels that fail or refuse to make their main characters appealing and instead inspire aversion in readers have received very little critical attention. Taking an unpopular novel (...)
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  6. Arjun Poudel (2013). European Avant-Garde Studies and the Future of Europe. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 8 (19):53-55.
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  7. Charles Ross (2013). Murrin, Lewis, Greenblatt, and the Aristotelian Self-Swerve. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 8 (19):1-10.
    Michael Murrin’s work on allegory provides an instructive contrast to Stephen Greenblatt’s Aristotelian conception of art as representation. This essay argues that Christian Platonism created the allegorical mode in which Spenser wrote, allowing a different perspective of the self than the one Greenblatt describes in Renaissance Self-Fashioning. The essay then suggests that those Christian thinkers who rejected Lucretius and Epicureanism did so for philosophical reasons deeply grounded in Plato’s thought–reasons that in the twentieth century found a home in the work (...)
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  8. J. Chris Westgate (2013). Philosophical Tensions in Modern Dramatic Literature. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 8 (19):57-58.
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  9. Heidi L. Pennington (2013). " But Why Must Readers Be Made to Feel....": Repulsing Readerly Sympathy for Ethical Ends in the Victorian Realist Novel. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 7 (19):33-47.
    In this article, I investigate the ethical potential of Victorian literature that markedly discourages readerly sympathy with the protagonists. Generating sympathy for fictional characters was, and often still is, considered to be the primary way in which the novel promotes ethical thoughts, feelings, and behavior in readers. For this reason, the ethical prospects of novels that fail or refuse to make their main characters appealing and instead inspire aversion in readers have received very little critical attention. Taking an unpopular novel (...)
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