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  1. Susan Dieleman (2014). Urban Agriculture, the Idyllic Farmer, and Stupid Knowing. Social Philosophy Today 30:47-62.
    In “Farming Made Her Stupid,” Lisa Heldke suggests that those who inhabit the metrocentric position participate in the marginalization of rural people and farmers through a process of “stupidification.” Rural people and farmers become “stupid,” a status that, on Heldke’s account, is worse than ignorant because “stupid people” are thought to be constitutionally incapable of knowing the right sorts of things because they know the wrong sorts of things . It seems reasonable, I suggest in this paper, to think that (...)
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  2. Jeff Gauthier (2014). Introduction. Social Philosophy Today 30:1-3.
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  3. Erinn Gilson (2014). Vote With Your Fork? Responsibility for Food Justice. Social Philosophy Today 30:113-130.
    As popular food writers and activists urge consumers to express their social, political, and ethical commitments through their food choices, the imperative to ‘vote with your fork’ has become a common slogan of emerging food movements in the US. I interrogate the conception of responsibility embedded in this dictate, which has become a de facto model for how to comport ourselves ethically with respect to food. I argue that it implicitly endorses a narrow and problematic understanding of responsibility. To contextualize (...)
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  4. Lisa Heldke & Jens Thomsen (2014). Two Concepts of Authenticity. Social Philosophy Today 30:79-94.
    This paper explores two apparently-unrelated forms of authenticity. One, “restaurant authenticity,” is a subcategory of the larger category of authentic objects, focused specifically on food and especially on ethnic cuisines. “Personal authenticity” refers to a set of traits or qualities in oneself. Contrary to appearances, I argue that the two forms of authenticity intertwine in ways that merit thoughtful attentiveness. I suggest that approaching the question of the authenticity of a cuisine with an attitude of flexibility and responsiveness can, in (...)
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  5. Neil Hibbert & Lisa F. Clark (2014). Democratic Legitimacy, Risk Governance, and GM Food. Social Philosophy Today 30:29-45.
    The use of Genetic Modification in food is the subject of deep political disagreement. Much of the disagreement involves different perceptions of the kinds of risks posed by pursuing GM food, and how these are to be tolerated and regulated. As a result, a primary institutional site of GM food politics is regulatory agencies tasked with risk assessment and regulation. Locating GM food politics in administrative areas of governance regimes produces unique challenges of democratic legitimacy, conventionally secured through legislative channels. (...)
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  6. Christopher Lowry (2014). Medina and Mill on Epistemic Interaction. Social Philosophy Today 30:177-185.
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  7. Joan McGregor (2014). Eat Right. Social Philosophy Today 30:95-111.
    In this paper, I will consider the moral considerations surrounding our food choices, including whether those choices are sustainable. Sustainability means preserving ecological integrity for current and future generations, and includes cultural sustainability which embodies values like justice and care for current and future generations as well as non-human animals. I will explore the widely accepted view that buying local is morally superior. In considering the moral reasons for buying local, I will investigate Peter Singer’s arguments against buying local, which (...)
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  8. José Medina (2014). Response to Beth Sperry, Chris Lowry, and Gaile Pohlhaus. Social Philosophy Today 30:207-216.
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  9. Andrew J. Pierce (2014). The Power and Politics of Disgust. Social Philosophy Today 30:131-143.
    This essay argues, drawing from both philosophical and scientific work on disgust, that since disgust is a universal human emotion with roots in evolutionary adaptation, and since capitalism inevitably produces disgusting food, a critique of capitalism based upon the category of disgust and centered on the food system may be more practically effective than traditional critiques of capitalism. This critique forms the basis of what I call a critical theory of food.
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  10. Gaile Pohlhaus (2014). Resistance and Epistemology. Social Philosophy Today 30:187-195.
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  11. Shane J. Ralston (2014). The Pragmatic Pyramid. Social Philosophy Today 30:63-76.
    Despite the minimal attention paid by philosophers to gardening, the activity has a myriad of philosophical implications—aesthetic, ethical, political, and even edible. The same could be said of community food security and struggles for food justice. Two of gardening’s most significant practical benefits are that it generates communal solidarity and provides sustenance for the needy and undernourished during periods of crisis. In the twentieth century, large-scale community gardening in the U.S. and Canada coincided with relief projects during war-time and economic (...)
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  12. Sally J. Scholz (2014). Women and Whiskey. Social Philosophy Today 30:147-159.
    The pairing of “whiskey” and “women” may at times be seen as an instance of what I call conspiratorial vices. Conspiratorial vices, I argue, are phenomena that, when working together, inform each other in a way that sets their content. Taken individually, the elements of the conspiracy are, at best, ambiguous with regard to their moral status. The conjoining of the concepts yields the status as “vice” and points to something deemed a threat to the social fabric. Through the use (...)
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  13. Elizabeth Sperry (2014). Medina on the Social Construction of Agency and Knowledge. Social Philosophy Today 30:197-205.
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  14. Paul B. Thompson (2014). The GMO Quandary and What It Means for Social Philosophy. Social Philosophy Today 30:7-27.
    Agricultural crops developed using the tools of genetic engineering have become socially institutionalized in three ways that substantially compromise the inherent potential of plant transformation tools. The first is that when farming depends upon debt finance, farmers find themselves in a competitive situation such that efficiency-enhancing technology fuels a trend of bankruptcy and increasing scale of production. As efficiency increasing tools, GMOs are embedded in controversial processes of social change in rural economies. The United States, at least, has chosen not (...)
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  15. William W. Young (2014). Listening and Obedience in the Political Realm. Social Philosophy Today 30:161-174.
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  16. William W. Young Iii (2014). Listening and Obedience in the Political Realm. Social Philosophy Today 30:161-174.
    Listening has received renewed attention in recent political philosophy. A central question in considering the modes of listening appropriate to democratic politics is their relationship to obedience. This paper develops an account of democratic listening, and its contrast with obedience, through the work of Theodor Adorno and Michel Foucault. Adorno’s analysis of the technological imposition of obedience on modern patterns of listening, and Foucault’s account of obedience as central to the rise of modern governmentality, both help to reflect upon the (...)
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