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Forthcoming articles
  1. Dustin Stokes & Vincent Bergeron (forthcoming). Modular Architectures and Informational Encapsulation: A Dilemma. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-24.
    Amongst philosophers and cognitive scientists, modularity remains a popular choice for an architecture of the human mind, primarily because of the supposed explanatory value of this approach. Modular architectures can vary both with respect to the strength of the notion of modularity and the scope of the modularity of mind. We propose a dilemma for modular architectures, no matter how these architectures vary along these two dimensions. First, if a modular architecture commits to the informational encapsulation of modules, as it (...)
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  2. Kristen Intemann (forthcoming). Distinguishing Between Legitimate and Illegitimate Values in Climate Modeling. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-16.
    While it is widely acknowledged that science is not “free” of non-epistemic values, there is disagreement about the roles that values can appropriately play. Several have argued that non-epistemic values can play important roles in modeling decisions, particularly in addressing uncertainties ; Risbey 2007; Biddle and Winsberg 2010; Winsberg : 111-137, 2012); van der Sluijs 359-389, 2012). On the other hand, such values can lead to bias ; Bray ; Oreskes and Conway 2010). Thus, it is important to identify when (...)
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  3. Simonluca Pinna (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Quantum Gravity – Lessons From Nicolai Hartmann. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-18.
    An astonishing thesis in the philosophy of quantum gravity is that spacetime ”disappears” at the fundamental level of reality, and that the geometrical notions of ”length” and ”duration” are derived from the dynamics of the basic non–geometrical building blocks of the theory. Unveiling here the analysis of the concepts of spacetime, measure, and magnitude, given by the philosopher Nicolai Hartmann, I argue that the ”disappearance” thesis is too strong. The fundamental geometrical notions are, on the contrary, primitive and cannot be (...)
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  4. Gregor Betz (forthcoming). Are Climate Models Credible Worlds? Prospects and Limitations of Possibilistic Climate Prediction. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-25.
    Climate models don’t give us probabilistic forecasts. To interpret their results, alternatively, as serious possibilities seems problematic inasmuch as climate models rely on contrary-to-fact assumptions: why should we consider their implications as possible if their assumptions are known to be false? The paper explores a way to address this possibilistic challenge. It introduces the concepts of a perfect and of an imperfect credible world, and discusses whether climate models can be interpreted as imperfect credible worlds. That would allow one to (...)
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  5. M. Bryson Brown & Graham Priest (forthcoming). Chunk and Permeate II: Bohr’s Hydrogen Atom. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-18.
    Niels Bohr’s model of the hydrogen atom is widely cited as an example of an inconsistent scientific theory because of its reliance on classical electrodynamics together with assumptions about interactions between matter and electromagnetic radiation that could not be reconciled with CED. This view of Bohr’s model is controversial, but we believe a recently proposed approach to reasoning with inconsistent commitments offers a promising formal reading of how Bohr’s model worked. In this paper we present this new way of reasoning (...)
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  6. Gavin A. Schmidt & Steven Sherwood (forthcoming). A Practical Philosophy of Complex Climate Modelling. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-21.
    We give an overview of the practice of developing and using complex climate models, as seen from experiences in a major climate modelling center and through participation in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project . We discuss the construction and calibration of models; their evaluation, especially through use of out-of-sample tests; and their exploitation in multi-model ensembles to identify biases and make predictions. We stress that adequacy or utility of climate models is best assessed via their skill against more naïve predictions. (...)
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  7. Katie Siobhan Steele (forthcoming). Bayesians Care About Stopping Rules Too. European Journal for Philosophy of Science.
     
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