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Forthcoming articles
  1.  14
    Claudio Mazzola (forthcoming). Still Foes: Benovsky on Relationism and Substantivalism. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-14.
    It is widely believed that relationism cannot make room for the possibility of intervals of time during which no changes occur. Benovsky has recently challenged this belief, arguing that relationists can account for the possibility of changeless time in much the same way as substantivalists do, thereby concluding that the two views are interchangeable for all theoretical purposes. This paper intends to defend the meaningfulness of the traditional dispute between substantivalists and relationists, by contending that the particular form of relationism (...)
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  2.  1
    Sorin Bangu (forthcoming). Scientific Explanation and Understanding: Unificationism Reconsidered. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-24.
    The articulation of an overarching account of scientific explanation has long been a central preoccupation for the philosophers of science. Although a while ago the literature was dominated by two approaches—a causal account and a unificationist account—today the consensus seems to be that the causal account has won. In this paper, I challenge this consensus and attempt to revive unificationism. More specifically, I aim to accomplish three goals. First, I add new criticisms to the standard anti-unificationist arguments, in order to (...)
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  3.  3
    Till Grüne-Yanoff (forthcoming). Interdisciplinary Success Without Integration. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-18.
    Some scholars see interdisciplinarity as a special case of a broader unificationist program. They accept the unification of the sciences as a regulative ideal, and derive from this the normative justification of interdisciplinary research practices. The crucial link for this position is the notion of integration: integration increases the cohesion of concepts and practices, and more specifically of explanations, ontologies, methods and data. Interdisciplinary success then consists in the integration of fields or disciplines, and this constitutes success in the sense (...)
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  4.  1
    Colin Howson (forthcoming). Regularity and Infinitely Tossed Coins. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-6.
    Timothy Williamson has claimed to prove that regularity must fail even in a nonstandard setting, with a counterexample based on tossing a fair coin infinitely many times. I argue that Williamson’s argument is mistaken, and that a corrected version shows that it is not regularity which fails in the non-standard setting but a fundamental property of shifts in Bernoulli processes.
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  5.  1
    Tarja Knuuttila & Andrea Loettgers (forthcoming). Model Templates Within and Between Disciplines: From Magnets to Gases – and Socio-Economic Systems. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-24.
    One striking feature of the contemporary modelling practice is its interdisciplinary nature. The same equation forms, and mathematical and computational methods, are used across different disciplines, as well as within the same discipline. Are there, then, differences between intra- and interdisciplinary transfer, and can the comparison between the two provide more insight on the challenges of interdisciplinary theoretical work? We will study the development and various uses of the Ising model within physics, contrasting them to its applications to socio-economic systems. (...)
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  6.  3
    Inkeri Koskinen & Uskali Mäki (forthcoming). Extra-Academic Transdisciplinarity and Scientific Pluralism: What Might They Learn From One Another? European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-26.
    The paper looks at challenges related to the ideas of integration and knowledge systems in extra-academic transdisciplinarity. Philosophers of science are only starting to pay attention to the increasingly common practice of introducing extra-academic perspectives or engaging extra-academic parties in academic knowledge production. So far the rather scant philosophical discussion on the subject has mainly concentrated on the question whether such engagement is beneficial in science or not. Meanwhile, there is quite a large and growing literature on extra-academic TD, mostly (...)
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  7. Chiara Lisciandra (forthcoming). Robustness Analysis and Tractability in Modeling. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-17.
    In the philosophy of science and epistemology literature, robustness analysis has become an umbrella term that refers to a variety of strategies. One of the main purposes of this paper is to argue that different strategies rely on different criteria for justifications. More specifically, I will claim that: i) robustness analysis differs from de-idealization even though the two concepts have often been conflated in the literature; ii) the comparison of different model frameworks requires different justifications than the comparison of models (...)
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  8.  7
    Eleonora Montuschi (forthcoming). Using Science, Making Policy: What Should We Worry About? European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-22.
    How does science enter policy making, and for what purpose? Surely consulting scientific facts in making policy is done with a view to making policy decisions more reliable, and ultimately more objective. In this paper I address the way/s by which science contributes to achieving objectivity in policy making and social debate, and argue that objectivity is not exhausted by what scientific evidence contributes to either. In policy making and social debates, scientific evidence is taken into account alongside other relevant (...)
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  9.  1
    Geurt Sengers (forthcoming). Presentism and Black Holes. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-15.
    In a recent publication in the European Journal for Philosophy of Science, Romero and Pérez claim to reveal new trouble for the already difficult life of presentism in relativistic spacetimes. Their argument purports to demonstrate the impossibility of postulating a viable present in the presence of black holes, in particular the Schwarzschild geometries. I argue that their argument is flawed, and that the Schwarzschild geometries they consider offer no novel threats to presentism. However, if we consider more general black holes, (...)
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  10.  2
    Maria Şerban (forthcoming). What Can Polysemy Tell Us About Theories of Explanation? European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-16.
    Philosophical accounts of scientific explanation are broadly divided into ontic and epistemic views. This paper explores the idea that the lexical ambiguity of the verb to explain and its nominalisation supports an ontic conception of explanation. I analyse one argument which challenges this strategy by criticising the claim that explanatory talk is lexically ambiguous, 375–394, 2012). I propose that the linguistic mechanism of transfer of meaning, 109–132, 1995) provides a better account of the lexical alternations that figure in the systematic (...)
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  11. Katie Siobhan Steele (forthcoming). Bayesians Care About Stopping Rules Too. European Journal for Philosophy of Science.
     
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  12.  1
    Henry Taylor & Peter Vickers (forthcoming). Conceptual Fragmentation and the Rise of Eliminativism. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-24.
    Pluralist and eliminativist positions have proliferated within both science and philosophy of science in recent decades. This paper asks the question why this shift of thinking has occurred, and where it is leading us. We provide an explanation which, if correct, entails that we should expect pluralism and eliminativism to transform other debates currently unaffected, and for good reasons. We then consider the question under what circumstances eliminativism will be appropriate, arguing that it depends not only on the term in (...)
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