Year:

  1.  9 DLs
    C'Zar Bernstein (2015). Gun Violence Agnosticism. Essays in Philosophy 16 (2).
    In this paper, I shall argue that the evidence supports, at the very best for the anti-gun side, agnosticism about the negative criminogenic effects of gun ownership. Given the plausible proposition that there is at least a prima facie moral right (a right that can be outweighed given sufficiently weighty considerations) to keep and bear arms, I argue that agnosticism supports the proposition that there ought to be a legal right to keep and bear arms.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2.  2 DLs
    Timothy Hsiao (2015). Against Gun Bans and Restrictive Licensing. Essays in Philosophy 16 (2).
    Arguments in favor of an individual moral right to keep and bear firearms typically appeal to the value of guns as a reasonable means of self-defense. This is, for the most part, an empirical claim. If it were shown that allowing private gun ownership would lead to an overall net increase in crime or other social harms, then the strength of a putative right to own a gun would be diminished. But would it be defeated completely? I do not think (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3.  2 DLs
    Michael Kocsis (2015). Gun Ownership and Gun Culture in the United States of America. Essays in Philosophy 16 (2).
    Almost everyone agrees that gun ownership is part of the complex fabric of values and traditions that comprise American society. All sides in the gun ownership debate understand that firearms are embedded deeply in America’s society and culture. But whereas for some the right to own guns is a non-negotiable promise guaranteed constitutionally, for others it is far more an element of the American experience than is desirable. This essay examines three arguments which have not usually received full treatment in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4.  5 DLs
    Vincent C. Müller (2015). Gun Control: A European Perspective. Essays in Philosophy 16 (2).
    From a European perspective the US debate about gun control is puzzling because we have no such debate: It seems obvious to us that dangerous weapons need tight control and that ‘guns’ fall under that category. I suggest that this difference occurs due to different habits that generate different attitudes and support this explanation with an analogy to the habits about knives. I conclude that it is plausible that individual knife-people or gun-people do not want tight regulatory legislation—but tight knife (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5.  2 DLs
    Howard Ponzer (2015). Limited Government and Gun Control. Essays in Philosophy 16 (2).
    In the following, the author presents a case for federally mandated gun control regulations. Specifically, the author argues—with reference to The Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights—that the principle of limited government often used against federal gun control laws actually provides legitimate justification for them. The aim is to persuade gun advocates to accept such regulations from their own point of view.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6.  6 DLs
    Christopher A. Riddle (2015). On Risk & Responsibility: Gun Control and the Ethics of Hunting. Essays in Philosophy 16 (2).
    This article explores gun control and the ethics of hunting and suggests that hunting ought not to be permitted, and not because of its impact on those animals that are hunted, but because of the risk other humans are subjected to as a result of some being permitted to own guns for mere preference satisfaction. This article examines the nature of freedom, its value, and how responsibility for the exercising of that freedom ought to be regarded when it involves subjecting (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7.  23 DLs
    Fuat Gursozlu (2015). Democracy and the Square: Recognizing the Democratic Value of the Recent Public Sphere Movements. Essays in Philosophy 16 (1):26-42.
    The paper considers the democratic value of the recent public sphere movements—from Occupy Wall Street to Taksim Gezi Park, from Tahrir Square to Sofia. It argues that the mainstream models of democracy fail to grasp the significance of these movements and the emergent political forms within these movements due to their narrow account of politics and democracy. To fully grasp the democratic value of recent public sphere movements, we should approach them from an agonistic perspective. Once democratic politics is viewed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues