Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  43
    Mark Alfano & Brian Robinson (forthcoming). Gossip as a Burdened Virtue. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    Gossip is often serious business, not idle chitchat. Gossip allows those oppressed to privately name their oppressors as a warning to others. Of course, gossip can be in error. The speaker may be lying or merely have lacked sufficient evidence. Bias can also make those who hear the gossip more or less likely to believe the gossip. By examining the social functions of gossip and considering the differences in power dynamics in which gossip can occur, we contend that gossip may (...)
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  2.  23
    Henrik Andersson (forthcoming). Parity and Comparability—a Concern Regarding Chang’s Chaining Argument. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-9.
    According to Ruth Chang the three standard positive value relations: “better than”, “worse than” and “equally good” do not fully exhaust the conceptual space for positive value relations. According to her, there is room for a fourth positive value relation, which she calls “parity”. Her argument for parity comes in three parts. First, she argues that there are items that are not related by the standard three value relations. Second, that these items are not incomparable, and third, that the phenomena (...)
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  3.  8
    Alfred Archer (forthcoming). Review: Steve Bein Compassion and Moral Guidance . 2013, ISBN 978-0-8248-3641-2, 222 Pages, 45 Dollars. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
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  4.  12
    William Bülow (forthcoming). William Irwin: The Free Market Existentialist: Capitalism Without Consumerism. John Wiley & Sons. 2015. 978-1-119-12128-2. 216 Pp. Paperpack. €20.30. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
  5.  7
    Jovana Davidovic (forthcoming). Should the Changing Character of War Affect Our Theories of War? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    War has changed so much that it barely resembles the paradigmatic cases of armed conflict that just war theories and international humanitarian law seemed to have had in mind even a few decades ago. The changing character of war includes not only the use of new technology such as drones, but probably more problematically the changing temporal and spatial scope of war and the changing character of actors in war. These changes give rise to worries about what counts as (...)
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  6.  2
    Elizabeth Finneron-Burns (forthcoming). Contractualism and the Non-Identity Problem. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    This paper argues that T.M. Scanlon’s contractualism can provide a solution to the non-identity problem. It first argues that there is no reason not to include future people in the realm of those to whom we owe justification, but that merely possible people are not included. It then goes on to argue that a person could reasonably reject a principle that left them with a barely worth living life even though that principle caused them to exist, and that current (...)
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  7.  60
    Robert William Fischer (forthcoming). Disgust as Heuristic. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    Suppose that disgust can provide evidence of moral wrongdoing. What account of disgust might make sense of this? A recent and promising theory is the social contagion view, proposed by Alexandra Plakias. After criticizing both its descriptive and normative claims, I draw two conclusions. First, we should question the wisdom of drawing so straight a line from biological poisons and pathogens to social counterparts. Second, we don’t need to explain the evidential value of disgust by appealing to what the response (...)
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  8.  20
    Sofia Jeppsson (forthcoming). Reasons, Determinism and the Ability to Do Otherwise. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    It has been argued that in a deterministic universe, no one has any reason to do anything. Since we ought to do what we have most reason to do, no one ought to do anything either. Firstly, it is argued that an agent cannot have reason to do anything unless she can do otherwise; secondly, that the relevant ‘can’ is incompatibilist. In this paper, I argue that even if the first step of the argument for reason incompatibilism succeeds, the second (...)
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  9.  8
    Zi Lin (forthcoming). The Leverage Approach for Sufficiency? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-8.
    Sufficiency principles generally state that it is especially important for justice that people have enough of certain goods, but it can be hard to give a convincing answer as to what level of goods counts as enough. This paper examines a recent sufficiency view by George Sher, who argues that the threshold level of resources and opportunities that the state should provide for each citizen is whatever level gives one enough leverage to obtain further resources and opportunities without inordinate difficulty (...)
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  10.  57
    Errol Lord (forthcoming). Justifying Partiality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-22.
    It's an undeniable fact about our moral lives that we are partial towards certain people and projects. Despite this, it has traditionally been very hard to morally justify partiality. In this paper I defend a novel partialist theory. The context of the paper is the debate between three different views of how partiality is justified. According to the first view, partiality is justified by facts about our ground projects. According to the second view, partiality is justified by facts about our (...)
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  11.  59
    Fritz J. McDonald (forthcoming). Review of Korsgaard's The Constitution of Agency (2008, OUP). [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
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  12.  34
    Kristina Meshelski (forthcoming). Procedural Justice and Affirmative Action. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-19.
    There is widespread agreement among both supporters and opponents that affirmative action either must not violate any principle of equal opportunity or procedural justice, or if it does, it may do so only given current extenuating circumstances. Many believe that affirmative action is morally problematic, only justified to the extent that it brings us closer to the time when we will no longer need it. In other words, those that support affirmative action believe it is acceptable in nonideal theory, but (...)
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  13.  15
    Alex Rajczi (forthcoming). On the Incoherence Objection to Rule-Utilitarianism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-20.
    For a long time many philosophers felt the incoherence objection was a decisive objection to rule-consequentialism, but that position has recently become less secure, because Brad Hooker has offered a clever new way for rule-consequentialists to avoid the incoherence objection. Hooker’s response defeats traditional forms of the incoherence objection, but this paper argues that another version of the problem remains. Several possible solutions fail. One other does not, but it introduces other problems into the theory. I conclude that the new (...)
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  14.  5
    Uwe Steinhoff (forthcoming). The Liability of Justified Attackers. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    McMahan argues that justification defeats liability to defensive attack (which would undermine the thesis of the "moral equality of combatants"). In response, I argue, first, that McMahan’s attempt to burden the contrary claim with counter-intuitive implications fails; second, that McMahan’s own position implies that the innocent civilians do not have a right of self-defense against justified attackers, which neither coheres with his description of the case (the justified bombers infringe the rights of the civilians) nor with his views about rights (...)
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  15.  17
    Krista K. Thomason (forthcoming). Guilt and Child Soldiers. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    The use of child soldiers in armed conflict is an increasing global concern. Although philosophers have examined whether child soldiers can be considered combatants in war, much less attention has been paid to their moral responsibility. While it is tempting to think of them as having diminished or limited responsibility, child soldiers often report feeling guilt for the wrongs they commit. Here I argue that their feelings of guilt are both intelligible and morally appropriate. The feelings of (...)
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  16. Agustin Vicente (forthcoming). Prostitution and the Ideal State: A Defense of a Policy of Vigilance. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    The debate concerning prostitution is centered around two main views: the liberal view and the radical feminist view. The typical liberal view is associated with decriminalization and normalization of prostitution; radical feminism stands in favor of prohibition or abolition. Here, I argue that neither of the views is right. My argument does not depend on the plausible (or actual) side effects of prohibition, abolition, or normalization; rather, I am concerned with the ideals involved. I will concede to liberals their claim (...)
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  17.  6
    Jan Willem Wieland (forthcoming). Willful Ignorance. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    Michelle Moody-Adams suggests that “the main obstacle to moral progress in social practices is the tendency to widespread affected ignorance of what can and should already be known.” This explanation is promising, though to understand it we need to know what willful (affected, motivated, strategic) ignorance actually is. This paper presents a novel analysis of this concept, which builds upon Moody-Adams (1994) and is contrasted with a recent account by Lynch (2016).
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  18.  2
    Jake Wojtowicz (forthcoming). Bernard Williams: Essays and Reviews 1959–2002. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
    A Review of Bernard Williams's Essays and Reviews.
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  19.  3
    Federico Zuolo (forthcoming). Dignity and Animals. Does It Make Sense to Apply the Concept of Dignity to All Sentient Beings? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    Although the idea of dignity has always been applied to human beings and although its role is far from being uncontroversial, some recent works in animal ethics have tried to apply the idea of dignity to animals. The aim of this paper is to discuss critically whether these attempts are convincing and sensible. In order to assess these proposals, I put forward two formal conditions that any conception of dignity must meet and outline three main approaches which might justify the (...)
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  20.  4
    Crystal Allen Gunasekera (forthcoming). Liability and Narrowly Targeted Wars. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
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  21.  63
    Enzo Rossi (forthcoming). Facts, Principles, and Politics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    Should our factual understanding of the world influence our normative theorising about it? G.A. Cohen has argued that our ultimate normative principles should not be constrained by facts. David Estlund and others have defended subsets of that claim. In this paper I dispute those positions by arguing that, in order to resist the conclusion that ultimate normative principles rest on facts about possibility or conceivability, one has to embrace an unsatisfactory account of how principles generate normative political judgments. So political (...)
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  22.  11
    Daniel Tigard (forthcoming). Judicial Discretion and the Problem of Dirty Hands. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
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  23.  6
    Kevin Vallier (forthcoming). In Defense of the Asymmetric Convergence Model of Public Justification: A Reply to Boettcher. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
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  24. Andreas Albertsen (forthcoming). Shlomi Segall , Equality and Opportunity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  25.  3
    Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Christoph Luetge, Hannes Rusch, & Matthias Uhl , Experimental Ethics: Toward an Empirical Moral Philosophy. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-4.
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  26.  8
    Eamon Aloyo (forthcoming). Reconciling Just Causes for Armed Humanitarian Intervention. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    Michael Walzer argues that the just cause for humanitarian intervention is not met if there are only “ordinary” levels of human rights abuses within a state because he believes that respecting the right to collective self-determination is more morally important than protecting other individual rights. Several prominent critics of Walzer advocate for a more permissive account of a just cause. They argue that protecting individuals’ human rights is more morally important than respecting a right to collective self-determination. I argue that (...)
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  27.  14
    Tammy Harel Ben-Shahar (forthcoming). Equality in Education – Why We Must Go All the Way. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    In this paper I present and defend a highly demanding principle of justice in education that has not been seriously discussed thus far. According to the suggested approach, “all the way equality”, justice in education requires nothing short of equal educational outcome between all individual students. This means not merely between equally able children, or between children from different groups and classes, but rather between all children, regardless of social background, race, sex and ability. This approach may seem implausible at (...)
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  28.  14
    Matteo Bonotti (forthcoming). Review Of: Brian Leiter, Why Tolerate Religion? [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  29.  2
    Matteo Bonotti (forthcoming). Annamari Vitikainen , The Limits of Liberal Multiculturalism: Towards an Individuated Approach to Cultural Diversity. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire; New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan. Vii + 226 Pp. Hardback € 81,99 ISBN 1137404612. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  30.  32
    D. Justin Coates (forthcoming). The Epistemic Norm of Blame. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    In this paper I argue that it is inappropriate for us to blame others if it is not reasonable for us to believe that they are morally responsible for their actions. The argument for this claim relies on two controversial claims: first, that assertion is governed by the epistemic norm of reasonable belief, and second, that the epistemic norm of implicatures is relevantly similar to the norm of assertion. I defend these claims, and I conclude by briefly suggesting how this (...)
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  31.  2
    Andrew I. Cohen (forthcoming). Corrective Vs. Distributive Justice: The Case of Apologies. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This paper considers the relation of corrective to distributive justice. I discuss the shortfalls of one sort of account that holds these are independent domains of justice. To support a more modest claim that these are sometimes independent domains of justice, I focus instead on the case of apologies. Apologies are sometimes among the measures specified by corrective justice. I argue that the sorts of injustices that apologies can help to correct need not always be departures from ideals specified by (...)
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  32. M. Victoria Costa (forthcoming). Cosmopolitanism as a Corrective Virtue. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This paper defends an account of cosmopolitanism as a corrective virtue of the sort endorsed by Philippa Foot. In particular, it argues that cosmopolitanism corrects a common and dangerous tendency to form overly strong identifications with political entities such as countries, nations, and cultures. The account helps to unify the current heterogeneous collection of cosmopolitan theories, as is illustrated by a discussion of the cultural cosmopolitanism of Jeremy Waldron, and the political cosmopolitanism of Simon Keller. The account also helps distinguish (...)
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  33.  9
    Christopher Cowie (forthcoming). Revisionist Responses to the Amoralism Objection: A Reply to Julia Markovits. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    Some subjectivist views of practical reasons entail that some people, in some cases, lack sufficient reasons to act as morality requires of them. This is often thought to form the basis of an objection to these subjectivist views: ‘the amoralism objection’. This objection has been developed at length by Julia Markovits in her recent book Moral Reason. But Markovits—alongside many other proponents of this objection—does not explicitly consider that her objection is premised on a claim that her opponents deny (...)
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  34.  21
    Daniel Crow (forthcoming). Causal Impotence and Evolutionary Influence: Epistemological Challenges for Non-Naturalism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    Two epistemological critiques of non-naturalism are not always carefully distinguished. According to the Causal Objection, the fact that moral properties cannot cause our moral beliefs implies that it would be a coincidence if many of them were true. According to the Evolutionary Objection, the fact that evolutionary pressures have influenced our moral beliefs implies a similar coincidence. After distinguishing these epistemological critiques, I provide an extensive defense of the Causal Objection that also strengthens the Evolutionary Objection. In particular, I formulate (...)
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  35.  9
    Adam Cureton (forthcoming). Unity of Reasons. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-19.
    There are at least two basic normative notions: rationality and reasons. The dominant normative account of reasons nowadays, which I call primitive pluralism about reasons, holds that some reasons are normatively basic and there is no underlying normative explanation of them in terms of other normative notions. Kantian constructivism about reasons, understood as a normative rather than a metaethical view, holds that rationality is the primitive normative notion that picks out which non-normative facts are reasons for what and explains why (...)
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  36.  3
    Daniel Eggers (forthcoming). Nothing New in Ecumenia? Hare, Hybrid Expressivism and de Dicto Beliefs. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    One important trend in the debate over expressivism and cognitivism is the emergence of ‘hybrid’ or ‘ecumenical’ theories. According to such theories, moral sentences express both beliefs, as cognitivism has it, and desire-like states, as expressivism has it. One may wonder, though, whether the hybrid move is as novel as its advocates seem to take it to be—or whether it simply leads us back to the conceptions of early expressivists, such as Charles Stevenson or Richard Hare. Michael Ridge has recently (...)
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  37.  21
    Melis Erdur (forthcoming). A Moral Argument Against Moral Realism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-12.
    If what is morally right or wrong were ultimately a function of our opinions, then even such reprehensible actions as genocide and slavery would be morally right, had we approved of them. Many moral philosophers find this conclusion objectionably permissive, and to avoid it they posit a moral reality that exists independently of what anyone thinks. The notion of an independent moral reality has been subjected to meticulous metaphysical, epistemological and semantic criticism, but it is hardly ever examined from a (...)
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  38.  6
    Yuliya Fadeeva (forthcoming). Ben Bramble, Bob Fischer The Moral Complexities of Eating Meat. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  39.  40
    Julian Fink (forthcoming). The Ladder of Rationality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-5.
    This paper is a review and critical discussion of John Broome’s Rationality Through Reasoning. In particular, it engages critically with Broome’s view on the independence of normative reasons and rationality, his construal of the capacity, property, and requirement senses of “rationality”, and his account of reasoning as a conscious, rule-following operation on mental contents.
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  40.  5
    Julian Fink (forthcoming). Erratum To: The Ladder of Rationality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-1.
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  41.  6
    Jessica Flanigan (forthcoming). Obstetric Autonomy and Informed Consent. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-20.
    I argue that public officials and health workers ought to respect and protect women’s rights to make risky choices during childbirth. Women’s rights to make treatment decisions ought to be respected even if their decisions expose their unborn children to unnecessary risks, and even if it is wrong to put unborn children at risk. I first defend a presumption of medical autonomy in the context of childbirth. I then draw on women’s birth stories to show that women’s medical autonomy is (...)
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  42.  4
    Andrew T. Forcehimes & Robert B. Talisse (forthcoming). Belief and the Error Theory. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-8.
    A new kind of debate about the normative error theory has emerged. Whereas longstanding debates have fixed on the error theory’s plausibility, this new debate concerns the theory’s believability. Bart Streumer is the chief proponent of the error theory’s unbelievability. In this brief essay, we argue that Streumer’s argument prevails against extant critiques, and then press a criticism of our own.
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  43.  1
    Frits Gåvertsson (forthcoming). Review: Samuel Scheffler’s Death and the Afterlife New York, Oxford University Press USA 2013, ISBN: 978-0-19-998250-9 224 Pp. € 26, 66. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-4.
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  44.  4
    Thomas Grote (forthcoming). Berit Brogaard: On Romantic Love: Simple Truths About a Complex Emotion, Oxford University Press, 2015. 288 Pages Hardcover $ 21.95 ISBN: 9780199370733. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  45.  4
    Thomas Grote (forthcoming). Review of Elijah Milgram: The Great Endarkenment – Philosophy for an Age of Hyperspecialization. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
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  46. Thomas Grote (forthcoming). James F. Keenan , University Ethics: How Universities Can Build and Benefit From a Culture of Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
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  47.  3
    Tobias Gutmann (forthcoming). Tobias Kasmann: Wertholismus. Zur Einheit des Moralischen Urteils. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  48.  6
    Lisa Herzog (forthcoming). Harry G. Frankfurt, On Inequality. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2015. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  49. Klaus Hoeyer (forthcoming). Webb Keane, Ethical Life. Its Natural and Social Histories. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  50.  5
    Sune Holm (forthcoming). A Right Against Risk-Imposition and the Problem of Paralysis. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    In this paper I examine the prospects for a rights-based approach to the morality of pure risk-imposition. In particular, I discuss a practical challenge to proponents of the thesis that we have a right against being imposed a risk of harm. According to an influential criticism, a right against risk-imposition will rule out all ordinary activities. The paper examines two strategies that rights theorists may follow in response to this “Paralysis Problem”. The first strategy introduces a threshold for when a (...)
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  51.  2
    Elena Irrera (forthcoming). Joachim Aufderheide and Ralf M. Bader : The Highest Good in Aristotle and Kant. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  52.  8
    Simon P. James (forthcoming). Ecosystem Services and the Value of Places. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    In the US Environmental Protection Agency, the World Wide Fund for Nature and many other environmental organisations, it is standard practice to evaluate particular woods, wetlands and other such places on the basis of the ‘ecosystem services’ they are thought to provide. I argue that this practice cannot account for one important way in which places are of value to human beings. When they play integral roles in our lives, particular places have a kind of value which cannot be adequately (...)
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  53.  3
    Anneli Jefferson (forthcoming). Torbjörn Tannsjö: Taking Life: Three Theories on the Ethics of Killing. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
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  54.  29
    Rainer Kattel (forthcoming). Brian Leiter and Neil Sinhababu (Eds), Nietzsche and Morality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    Brian Leiter and Neil Sinhababu (eds), Nietzsche and Morality Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10677-008-9134-6 Authors Rainer Kattel, Tallinn University of Technology Ehitajate tee 5 19086 Tallinn Estonia Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820.
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  55.  7
    Suzy Killmister (forthcoming). Dignity, Torture, and Human Rights. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This paper focuses on a distinct puzzle for understanding the relationship between dignity and human rights. The puzzle is that dignity appears to enter human rights theory in two distinct roles: on the one hand, dignity is commonly pointed to as the foundation of human rights, i.e. that in virtue of which we have human rights. On the other hand, dignity is commonly pointed to as that which is at risk in a subset of human (...)
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  56. Peter P. Kirschenmann (forthcoming). Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen, Personal Value, Oxford University Press: Oxford: 2011, 185 Pp. ISBN 978-0-19-960,378-7 € 59,99. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  57.  2
    Andrea Klonschinski (forthcoming). Jonathan B. Wight: Ethics and Economics: An Introduction to Moral Frameworks. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  58.  12
    Victor Kumar & Richmond Campbell (forthcoming). Honor and Moral Revolution. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    Western philosophers have generally neglected honor as a moral phenomenon worthy of serious study. Appiah’s recent work on honor in moral revolutions is an important exception, but even he is careful to separate honor from morality, regarding it as only “an ally” of morality. In this paper we take Appiah to be right about the psychological, social, and historical role honor has played in three notable moral revolutions, but wrong about the moral nature of honor. We defend two new theses: (...)
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  59.  5
    Micah Lott (forthcoming). Agency, Patiency, and The Good Life: The Passivities Objection to Eudaimonism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    Many contemporary eudaimonists emphasize the role of agency in the good life. Mark LeBar, for example, characterizes his own eudaimonist view this way: “It is agentist, not patientist, because it emphasizes that our lives go well in virtue of what we do, rather than what happens, to us or otherwise”. Nicholas Wolterstorff, however, has argued that this prioritizing of agency over patiency is a fatal flaw in eudaimonist accounts of well-being. Eudaimonism must be rejected, Wolterstorff argues, because many life-goods are (...)
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  60.  1
    Michael Milona (forthcoming). Taking the Perceptual Analogy Seriously. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-19.
    This paper offers a qualified defense of a historically popular view that I call sentimental perceptualism. At a first pass, sentimental perceptualism says that emotions play a role in grounding evaluative knowledge analogous to the role perceptions play in grounding empirical knowledge. Recently, András Szigeti and Michael Brady have independently developed an important set of objections to this theory. The objections have a common structure: they begin by conceding that emotions have some important epistemic role to play, but then go (...)
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  61.  1
    Jean Moritz Müller (forthcoming). Sabine Roeser & Cain Todd : Emotion and Value Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN: 978-0-19-968609-4, 272 Pages, £40.00. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  62.  5
    Hadassa Noorda (forthcoming). Helen Frowe, Defensive Killing. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  63.  1
    Timothy J. Oakberg (forthcoming). There Should Not Be Shame in Sharing Responsibility: An Alternative to May’s Social Existentialist Vision. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    Some of the greatest harms perpetrated by human beings—mass murders, for example—are directly caused by a small number of individuals, yet the full force of the transgressions would not obtain without the indirect contributions of many others. To combat such evils, Larry May argues that we ought to cultivate a sense of shared responsibility within communities. More specifically, we ought to develop a propensity to feel ashamed of ourselves when we choose to be associated with others who transgress. Grant that (...)
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  64.  2
    Francesco Orsi (forthcoming). Iwao Hirose and Andrew Reisner : Weighing and Reasoning. Themes From the Philosophy of John Broome. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  65.  5
    Tom Parr (forthcoming). The Moral Taintedness of Benefiting From Injustice. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    It is common to focus on the duties of the wrongdoer in cases that involve injustice. Presumably, the wrongdoer owes her victim an apology for having wronged her and perhaps compensation for having harmed her. But, these are not the only duties that may arise. Are other beneficiaries of an injustice permitted to retain the fruits of the injustice? If not, who becomes entitled to those funds? In recent years, the Connection Account has emerged as an influential account that purports (...)
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  66.  4
    Maura Priest (forthcoming). Blame After Forgiveness. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    When a wrongdoing occurs, victims, barring special circumstance, can aptly forgive their wrongdoers, receive apologies, and be paid reparations. It is also uncontroversial, in the usual circumstances, that wronged parties can aptly blame their wrongdoer. But controversy arises when we consider blame from third-parties after the victim has forgiven. At times it seems that wronged parties can make blame inapt through forgiveness. If third parties blame anyway, it often appears the victim is justified in protesting. “But I forgave him!” In (...)
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  67.  13
    Philip A. Reed (forthcoming). Empirical Adequacy and Virtue Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    Situationists contend that virtue ethics is empirically inadequate. However, it is my contention that there is much confusion over what “empirical adequacy” or “empirical inadequacy” actually means in this context. My aim in this paper is to clarify the meanings of empirical adequacy in order to see to what extent virtue ethics might fail to meet this standard. I argue that the situationists frequently misconstrue the empirical commitments of virtue ethics. More importantly, depending on what we mean by empirical adequacy, (...)
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  68.  3
    Tim Rojek (forthcoming). Christopher Yeomans: The Expansion of Autonomy: Hegel’s Pluralistic Philosophy of Action. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  69.  4
    Alexandre Gajevic Sayegh (forthcoming). Henry Shue, Climate Justice: Vulnerability and Protection. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  70.  5
    Geoffrey Scarre (forthcoming). On Taking Back Forgiveness. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    I argue that the effectiveness of forgiveness in the healing of relationships is dependent on both the givers and recipients of forgiveness understanding that once it has been granted, forgiveness is not normally able to be retracted. When we forgive, we make a firm commitment not to return to our former state of moral resentment against the offender, replacing it by good-will. This commitment can be broken only where the forgiving party makes some significant cognitive adjustment to her appraisal of (...)
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  71. David Schumann (forthcoming). David Thunder: Review Of: Citizenship and the Pursuit of the Worthy Life. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  72.  1
    Mitu Sengupta (forthcoming). Global Justice and Development. By Julian Culp. Palgrave Macmillan UK, 2014. 215 Pp. ISBN 978-1-137-38992-3. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  73.  4
    Joshua Shaw (forthcoming). What Do Gestational Mothers Deserve? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This paper analyzes the following question: What do women deserve, ethically speaking, when they agree to gestate a fetus on behalf of third parties? I argue for several claims. First, I argue that gestational motherhood’s moral significance has been misunderstood, an oversight I attribute to the focus in family ethics on the conditions of parenthood. Second, I use a less controversial version of James Rachels’s account of desert to argue that gestational mothers deserve a parent-like voice as well as significant (...)
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  74.  3
    Derek Shiller (forthcoming). A Primitive Solution to the Negation Problem. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    It has recently been alleged that expressivism cannot account for the obvious fact that normative sentences and their negations express inconsistent kinds of attitudes. I explain how the expressivist can respond to this objection. I offer an account of attitudinal inconsistency that takes it to be a combination of descriptive and normative relations. The account I offer to explain these relations relies on a combination of functionalism about normative judgments and expressivism about the norms governing them. It holds that the (...)
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  75.  7
    Mari Stenlund (forthcoming). Is There a Right to Hold a Delusion? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
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  76.  4
    Alan Strudler (forthcoming). Respectful Lying. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-12.
    I argue that there are instances in which lying to an innocent and generally competent person respects her autonomy, contrary to arguments by Christine Korsgaard and Onora O’Neill. These authors say that respect for a person’s autonomy requires treating her in a way consistent with the possibility of consent, but I contend that the possibility of consent condition is unworkable. I maintain that lying can respect individual autonomy when being truthful to a person undermines her choices and lying gets her (...)
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  77.  1
    Klara Helene Stumpf, Christian U. Becker & Stefan Baumgärtner (forthcoming). A Conceptual Structure of Justice - Providing a Tool to Analyse Conceptions of Justice. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    Justice is a contested concept. There are many different and competing conceptions, i.e. interpretations of the concept. Different domains of justice deal with different fields of application of justice claims, such as structural justice, distributive justice, participatory justice or recognition. We present a formal conceptual structure of justice applicable to all these domains. We show that conceptions of justice can be described by specifying the following conceptual elements: the judicandum, the community of justice including claim holders and claim addressees, their (...)
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  78.  4
    Demetris Tillyris (forthcoming). After the Standard Dirty Hands Thesis: Towards a Dynamic Account of Dirty Hands in Politics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This essay locates the problem of dirty hands within virtue ethics – specifically Alasdair MacIntyre’s neo-Aristotelian thesis in After Virtue. It demonstrates that, contra contemporary expositions of this problem, MacIntyre’s thesis provides us with a more nuanced account of tragedy and DH in ordinary life, in its conventional understanding as a stark, rare and momentary conflict in which moral wrongdoing is inescapable. The essay then utilizes elements from MacIntyre’s thesis as a theoretical premise for Machiavelli’s thought so as to set (...)
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  79.  24
    Matthias Uhl (forthcoming). Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski, Markets Without Limits. Moral Virtues and Commercial Interests, 2016. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
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  80.  10
    Raphael van Riel (forthcoming). Jason Stanley, How Propaganda Works. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  81.  6
    Steve Vanderheiden (forthcoming). The Obligation to Know: Information and the Burdens of Citizenship. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    Contemporary persons are daily confronted with enormous quantities of information, some of which reveal causal connections between their actions and harm that is visited upon distant others. Given their limited cognitive and information processing capacities, persons cannot reasonably be expected to respond to every cry for help or call to action, but neither can they defensibly refuse to hear and reflect upon any of them. Persons have a limited obligation to know, I argue, which requires that they inform themselves and (...)
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  82.  4
    Somogy Varga (forthcoming). Autonomous Self-Expression and Meritocratic Dignity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-19.
    While “dignity” plays an increasingly important role in contemporary moral and political debates, there is profound dispute over its definition, meaning, and normative function. Instead of concluding that dignity’s elusiveness renders it useless, or that it signals its fundamental character, this paper focuses on illuminating one particular strand of meritocratic dignity. It introduces a number of examples and conceptual distinctions and argues that there is a specific strand of “expressive” meritocratic dignity that is not connected to holding a special office (...)
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  83.  2
    Joseph P. Walsh (forthcoming). Agent-Basing, Consequences, and Realized Motives. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    According to agent-based approaches to virtue ethics, the rightness of an action is a function of the motives which prompted that action. If those motives were morally praiseworthy, then the action was right; if they were morally blameworthy, the action was wrong. Many critics find this approach problematically insensitive to an act’s consequences, and claim that agent-basing fails to preserve the intuitive distinction between agent- and act-evaluation. In this article I show how an agent-based account of right action can be (...)
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  84.  2
    Timothy Weidel (forthcoming). Ideology and the Harms of Self-Deception: Why We Should Act to End Poverty. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    In thinking about global poverty, the question of moral motivation is of central importance: Why should the average person in the West feel morally compelled to do anything to help the poor? Various answers to this question have been constructed—and yet poverty persists. In this paper I will argue that, among other difficulties, the current approaches to the problem of poverty overlook a critical element: that poverty not only harms the poor, it harms every human being. Its existence forces us (...)
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  85.  3
    Alan T. Wilson (forthcoming). Sandrine Berges: A Feminist Perspective on Virtue Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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  86. Daniela Zumpf (forthcoming). Axel Honneth , Die Idee des Sozialismus. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
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