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Forthcoming articles
  1. Henrik Andersson (forthcoming). Propping Up the Collapsing Principle. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-12.
    According to a standard account of incomparability, two value bearers are incomparable if it is false that there holds a positive value relation between them. Due to the vagueness of the comparative predicates it may also be indeterminate as to which relation that holds - for each relation it is neither true nor false that it holds. John Broome has argued that indeterminacy cannot coexist with incomparability and since there seems to exist indeterminacy there cannot exist incomparability. At the core (...)
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  2. Vuko Andric & Attila Tanyi (forthcoming). Multidimensional Consequentialism and Risk. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    . In his new book, The Dimensions of Consequentialism, Martin Peterson proposes a version of multi-dimensional consequentialism according to which risk is one among several dimensions. We argue that Peterson’s treatment of risk is unsatisfactory. More precisely, we want to show that all problems of one-dimensional (objective or subjective) consequentialism are also problems for Peterson’s proposal, although it may fall prey to them less often. In ending our paper, we address the objection that our discussion overlooks the fact that Peterson’s (...)
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  3. Ben Bramble (forthcoming). On Susan Wolf's 'Good-For-Nothings'. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.
    In her recent Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, “Good-For-Nothings”, Susan Wolf (2011) argues against welfarism about value by appeal to great works of art, literature, music, and philosophy. Wolf gives three main arguments, which I call The Superfluity Argument, The Explanation of Benefit Argument, and The Welfarist’s Mistake. In this paper, I reconstruct these arguments and explain where, in my view, each goes wrong.
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  4. Stephen M. Campbell (forthcoming). When the Shape of a Life Matters. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.
    It seems better to have a life that begins poorly and ends well than a life that begins well and ends poorly. One possible explanation is that the very ‘shape’ of a life can be good or bad for us. If so, this raises a tough question: when can the shape of our lives be good or bad for us? In this essay, I present and critique an argument that the shape of a life is a non-synchronic prudential value—that is, (...)
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  5. Abraham D. Graber (forthcoming). Towards a Cognitive Scientific Vindication of Moral Realism: The Semantic Argument. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.
    In a methodological milieu characterized by efforts to bring the methods of philosophy closer to the methods of the sciences, one can find, with increasing regularity, meta-ethical arguments relying on scientific theory or data. The received view appears to be that, not only is it implausible to think that a scientific vindication of a non-mentalist moral semantics will be forthcoming but that evidence from a variety of sciences threatens to undermine non-mentalist views. My aim is to push back against this (...)
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  6. Fritz J. McDonald (forthcoming). Review of Korsgaard's The Constitution of Agency (2008, OUP). [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
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  7. Michael Moehler (forthcoming). Rational Cooperation and the Nash Bargaining Solution. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    In a recent article, McClennen (2012) defends an alternative bargaining theory in response to his criticisms of the standard Nash bargaining solution as a principle of distributive justice in the context of the social contract. McClennen rejects the orthodox concept of expected individual utility maximizing behavior that underlies the Nash bargaining model in favor of what he calls full rationality, and McClennen’s full cooperation bargaining theory demands that agents select the most egalitarian strictly Pareto-optimal distributional outcome that is strictly Pareto-superior (...)
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  8. Earl Spurgin (forthcoming). An Emotional-Freedom Defense of Schadenfreude. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    Schadenfreude is the emotion we experience when we obtain pleasure from others’ misfortunes. Typically, we are not proud of it and admit experiencing it only sheepishly or apologetically. Philosophers typically view it, and the disposition to experience it, as moral failings. Two recent defenders of Schadenfreude, however, argue that it is morally permissible because it stems from judgments about the just deserts of those who suffer misfortunes. I also defend Schadenfreude, but on different grounds that overcome two deficiencies of those (...)
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  9. Bill Wringe (forthcoming). Perp Walks as Punishment. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    When Dominique Strauss-Kahn, then head of the IMF, was arrested on charges of sexual assault arising from events that were alleged to have occurred during his stay in an up-market hotel in New York, a sizeable portion of French public opinion was outraged - not by the possibility that a well-connected and widely-admired politician had assaulted an immigrant hotel worker, but by the way in which the accused had been treated by the American authorities. I shall argue that in one (...)
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  10. Michael Yudanin (forthcoming). Can Positive Duties Be Derived From Kant's Categorical Imperative? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-20.
    Kant’s moral philosophy usually considers two types of duties: negative duties that prohibit certain actions and positive duties commanding action. With that, Kant insists on deriving all morality from reason alone. Such is the Categorical Imperative that Kant lays at the basis of ethics. Yet while negative duties can be derived from the Categorical Imperative and thus from reason, the paper argues that this is not the case with positive duties. After answering a number of attempts to derive positive duties (...)
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  11. T. J. Kasperbauer (forthcoming). Rejecting Empathy for Animal Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    Ethicists have become increasingly skeptical about the importance of empathy in producing moral concern for others. One of the main claims made by empathy skeptics is a psychological thesis: empathy is not the primary psychological process responsible for producing moral concern. Some of the best evidence that could confirm or disconfirm this thesis comes from research on empathizing with animals. However, this evidence has not been discussed in any of the prominent critiques of empathy. In this paper, I investigate six (...)
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  12. Gesa Lindemann (forthcoming). From the Critique of Judgment to the Principle of the Open Question. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    The relevance of Kant to Plessner’s work was long all but ignored and there is hardly any mention of Plessner in the Kant literature. The Plessner renaissance beginning in the 1990s, however, has brought with it a stronger focus on the methodological construction of his theory, so that the Kant connection has at least been acknowledged, but the particular relevance of Kant’s Critique of Judgement (Kant 1790/2007) has not been systematically explicated. In this essay, I investigate the connection between Kant’s (...)
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  13. Christopher Morgan-Knapp (forthcoming). Nonconsequentialist Precaution. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    How cautious should regulators be? A standard answer is consequentialist: regulators should be just cautious enough to maximize expected social value. This paper charts the prospects of a nonconsequentialist - and more precautionary - alternative. More specifically, it argues that a contractualism focused on ex ante consent can motivate the following regulatory criterion: regulators should permit a socially beneficial risky activity only if no one can be expected to be made worse off by it. Broadly speaking, there are two strategies (...)
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  14. Sebastian Nye (forthcoming). Real Politics and Metaethical Baggage. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    So-called 'realists' have argued that political philosophers should engage with real politics, but that mainstream 'non-realist' political philosophers fail to do so. Perhaps surprisingly, many of the discussions between realists and their critics have not drawn much on debates in metaethics. In this paper, I argue that this is an oversight. There are important connections between the realism/non-realism debate and certain controversies in metaethics. Both realism and non-realism come with metaethical baggage. By considering several arguments that could be made for (...)
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  15. Tammy Harel Ben-Shahar (forthcoming). Equality in Education – Why We Must Go All the Way. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    In this paper I present and defend a highly demanding principle of justice in education that has not been seriously discussed thus far. According to the suggested approach, “all the way equality”, justice in education requires nothing short of equal educational outcome between all individual students. This means not merely between equally able children, or between children from different groups and classes, but rather between all children, regardless of social background, race, sex and ability. This approach may seem implausible at (...)
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  16. Deryck Beyleveld & Paul Ziche (forthcoming). Towards a Kantian Phenomenology of Hope. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    The aim of this paper is to examine the extent to which Kant’s Critique of the Power of Judgment can be, or otherwise ought to be, regarded as a transcendental phenomenology of hope. Kant states repeatedly that CPoJ mediates between the first two Critiques, or between the theoretical knowledge we arrive at on the basis of understanding and reason’s foundational role for practical philosophy. In other words, exercising the power of judgment is implicated whenever we try to bring together the (...)
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  17. Giulia Bistagnino (forthcoming). Kevin Vallier, Liberal Politics and Public Faith. Beyond Separation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
    Kevin Vallier’s book, Liberal Politics and Public Faith. Beyond Separation, constitutes an essential reading for anyone interested in public reason liberalism and in the debate concerning the role of religion in contemporary democratic societies. Vallier argues for a strong version of convergence in public justification, aiming at defending an account of liberalism friendly towards religion and religious citizens. Against traditional forms of liberalism built on the idea of neutrality and embodied in a secularized view of social institutions, Vallier’s goal is (...)
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  18. Karin Edvardsson Björnberg (forthcoming). Historic Injustices and the Moral Case for Cultural Repatriation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    It is commonly argued that cultural objects ought to be returned to their place of origin in order to remedy injustices committed in the past. In this paper, it is shown that significant challenges attach to this way of arguing. Although there is considerable intuitive appeal in the idea that if somebody wrongs another person then she ought to compensate for that injustice, the principle is difficult (albeit not impossible) to apply to wrongdoings committed many decades or centuries ago. It (...)
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  19. Michele Bocchiola (forthcoming). Nicholas Southwood: Contractualism and the Foundations of Morality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
    In the contemporary philosophical debate, there are two opposing contractualist views. On the one side, Hobbesian contractualisms take moral principles as side-constraints to redress the failures of the interaction among self-interested individuals. On the other, Kantian versions of the social contract ground morality on an impartial and moralized viewpoint. In his recent Contractualism and the Foundations of Morality, Nicholas Southwood proposes a third and novel form of contractualism, with the aim to overcome the “implausibly personal and partial characterization of the (...)
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  20. Jan Bransen (forthcoming). Self-Knowledge and Self-Love. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    In this paper I argue for the claim that self-love is a precondition for self-knowledge. This claim is relevant to the contemporary philosophical debate on self-knowledge, but mainly because it draws attention to the role of claims of self-knowledge in the larger context of our ordinary practice of rationalizing and appropriating our actions. In this practice it is crucial for persons to open-mindedly investigate the limits of their own responsible agency, an investigation that requires a warm and gentle kindness to (...)
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  21. George Crowder (forthcoming). Value Pluralism, Diversity and Liberalism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    Few would disagree that contemporary society is characterized by ‘pluralism’, but what this means is widely disputed. Among the many senses of pluralism current in contemporary political theory, ‘value pluralism’ is one of the most keenly contested. The classic account is found in Isaiah Berlin, who sees basic human values as irreducibly multiple, often conflicting, and sometimes incommensurable with one another.Berlin’s pluralist views are scattered throughout his work, but major statements include the Introduction and last section of ‘Two Concepts of (...)
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  22. Ned Dobos (forthcoming). Anna Goppel: Killing Terrorists: A Legal and Moral Analysis. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
    Targeted killing has become a staple tactic in the “war in terror”. Since the beginning of the second Intifada, Israel is estimated to have killed over four hundred Palestinians in targeted strikes, while the US has killed over two thousand in Pakistan alone since 2004. These statistics include the deaths of innocent bystanders caught in the wrong place at the wrong time—“collateral damage”—as well as the deaths of the terrorists themselves. Be that as it may, the American and Israeli publics (...)
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  23. Gideon Elford (forthcoming). Pains of Perseverance: Agent-Centred Prerogatives, Burdens and the Limits of Human Motivation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    An important question in recent work in political philosophy concerns whether facts about individuals’ motivational deficiencies are facts to which principles of justice are sensitive. In this context, David Estlund has recently argued that the difficulties individuals’ face in motivating themselves to act do not affect the content of normative principles that apply to them. Against Estlund, the paper argues that in principle the motivational difficulties individuals face can affect the content of normative principles that apply to them. This argument (...)
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  24. Christopher Freiman (forthcoming). How Neuroscience Can Vindicate Moral Intuition. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    Imagine that an anthropologist returns from her study of a group of people and reports the following:They refuse to kill one person even to avert the death of all involved—including that one person;They won’t directly push someone to his death to save the lives of five others, but they will push a lever to kill him to save five others;They punish transgressors because it feels right, even when they expect the punishment to cause far more harm than good—and even when (...)
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  25. Katherine E. Furman (forthcoming). Jonathan Matheson, Rico Vitz : The Ethics of Belief. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
    The editors of this collection set out with the intention of extending the debate in the ethics of belief beyond its traditional topics, such as whether it is ever permissible to form beliefs on insufficient evidence, and if pragmatic concerns should play a role in responsible belief formation. The result is that this collection covers an expansive range of material.Some of the topics that are covered are in keeping with the traditional bounds of the literature, such as whether direct doxastic (...)
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  26. Luke Gelinas (forthcoming). Frames, Choice-Reversal, and Consent. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-9.
    Recently Jason Hanna has argued that a particular type of susceptibility to framing effects—namely, the tendency to reverse one’s choice between certain logically equivalent frames—invalidates actual tokens of consent. Here I argue that this claim is false: proneness to choice-reversal per se between the relevant types of frames does not invalidate consent.
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  27. Megs S. Gendreau (forthcoming). Who? Moral Condemnation, PEDs, and Violating the Constraints of Public Narrative. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    Despite the numerous instances of PED use in professional sports, there continues to be a strong negative moral response to those athletes who dope. My goal is to offer a diagnosis of this response. I will argue that we do not experience such disdain because these athletes have broken some constitutive rule of sport, but because they have lied about who they are. In violating the constraints of their own public narratives, they make both themselves and their choices unintelligible. This (...)
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  28. Mollie Gerver (forthcoming). Consent for Data on Consent. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    There are instances where the provider of an intervention, such as surgery, has failed to obtain necessary informed consent from the recipient of the intervention. Perhaps the surgeon has failed to warn the patient that she may go into a coma, or even be killed, from the surgery. Sometimes, as a result of this intervention, the recipient cannot give informed consent to researchers for the release of their personal data precisely because of the intervention. If they are in a coma, (...)
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  29. John Hacker-Wright (forthcoming). Skill, Practical Wisdom, and Ethical Naturalism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.
    IntroductionRecent work in virtue theory has breathed new life into the analogy between virtue and skill.See, for example, Annas ; Bloomfield ; Stichter ; Swartwood . There is good reason to think that this analogy is worth pursuing since it may help us understand the distinctive nexus of reasoning, knowledge, and practical ability that is found in virtue by pointing to a similar nexus found outside moral contexts in skill. In some ways, there is more than an analogy between skill (...)
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  30. Lisa Herzog (forthcoming). Distributive Justice, Feasibility Gridlocks, and the Harmfulness of Economic Ideology. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    Many political theorists think about how to make societies more just. In recent years, with interests shifting from principles to their institutional realization, there has been much debate about feasibility and the role it should play in theorizing. What has been underexplored, however, is how feasibility depends on the attitudes and perceptions of individuals, not only with regard to their own behaviour, but also with regard to the behaviour of others. This can create coordination problems, which can be described as (...)
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  31. Simon P. James (forthcoming). Ecosystem Services and the Value of Places. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    In the US Environmental Protection Agency, the World Wide Fund for Nature and many other environmental organisations, it is standard practice to evaluate particular woods, wetlands and other such places on the basis of the ‘ecosystem services’ they are thought to provide. I argue that this practice cannot account for one important way in which places are of value to human beings. When they play integral roles in our lives, particular places have a kind of value which cannot be adequately (...)
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  32. Karin Jønch-Clausen & Klemens Kappel (forthcoming). Social Epistemic Liberalism and the Problem of Deep Epistemic Disagreements. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    Recently Robert B. Talisse has put forth a socio-epistemic justification of liberal democracy that he believes qualifies as a public justification in that it purportedly can be endorsed by all reasonable individuals. In avoiding narrow restraints on reasonableness, Talisse argues that he has in fact proposed a justification that crosses the boundaries of a wide range of religious, philosophical and moral worldviews and in this way the justification is sufficiently pluralistic to overcome the challenges of reasonable pluralism familiar from Rawls. (...)
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  33. Rainer Kattel (forthcoming). Brian Leiter and Neil Sinhababu (Eds), Nietzsche and Morality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    Brian Leiter and Neil Sinhababu (eds), Nietzsche and Morality Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10677-008-9134-6 Authors Rainer Kattel, Tallinn University of Technology Ehitajate tee 5 19086 Tallinn Estonia Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820.
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  34. Hallvard Lillehammer & Niklas Möller (forthcoming). We Can Believe the Error Theory. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-7.
    Bart Streumer argues that it is not possible for us to believe the error theory, where by ‘error theory’ he means the claim that our normative beliefs are committed to the existence of normative properties even though such properties do not exist. In this paper, we argue that it is indeed possible to believe the error theory. First, we suggest a critical improvement to Streumer’s argument. As it stands, one crucial premise of that argument—that we cannot have a belief while (...)
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  35. Kevin Macnish (forthcoming). An Eye for an Eye: Proportionality and Surveillance. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-20.
    It is often claimed that surveillance should be proportionate, but it is rarely made clear exactly what proportionate surveillance would look like beyond an intuitive sense of an act being excessive. I argue that surveillance should indeed be proportionate and draw on Thomas Hurka’s work on proportionality in war to inform the debate on surveillance. After distinguishing between the proportionality of surveillance per se, and surveillance as a particular act, I deal with objections to using proportionality as a legitimate ethical (...)
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  36. Andrew James McAninch (forthcoming). Acting for a Reason and Following a Principle. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    According to an influential view of practical reason and rational agency, a person acts for a reason only if she recognizes some consideration to be a reason, where this recognition motivates her to act. I call this requirement the guidance condition on acting for a reason. Despite its intuitive appeal, the guidance condition appears to generate a vicious regress. At least one proponent of the guidance condition, Christine M. Korsgaard, is sensitive to this regress worry, and her appeal in recent (...)
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  37. J. P. Messina & Chris W. Surprenant (forthcoming). Situationism and the Neglect of Negative Moral Education. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This paper responds to the recent situationist critique of practical rationality and decision-making. According to that critique, empirical evidence indicates that our choices are governed by morally irrelevant situational factors and not durable character traits, and rarely result from overt rational deliberation. This critique is taken to indicate that popular moral theories in the Western tradition are descriptively deficient, even if normatively plausible or desirable. But we believe that the situationist findings regarding the sources of, or influences over, our moral (...)
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  38. Brent Daniel Mittelstadt, Bernd Carsten Stahl & N. Ben Fairweather (forthcoming). How to Shape a Better Future? Epistemic Difficulties for Ethical Assessment and Anticipatory Governance of Emerging Technologies. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-21.
    Empirical research into the ethics of emerging technologies, often involving foresight studies, technology assessment or application of the precautionary principle, raises significant epistemological challenges by failing to explain the relative epistemic status of contentious normative claims about future states. This weakness means that it is unclear why the conclusions reached by these approaches should be considered valid, for example in anticipatory ethical assessment or governance of emerging technologies. This paper explains and responds to this problem by proposing an account of (...)
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  39. D. Mokrosinska (forthcoming). Annabelle Lever: On Privacy. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
    “On Privacy” introduces philosophical arguments bearing on contemporary debates about privacy protection. The book, written for a non-academic audience, focuses on the value of privacy. Lever’s approach is refreshing. First, she sidesteps the controversies over defining privacy, settling for concepts generally associated with privacy: seclusion and solitude, anonymity and confidentiality, intimacy and domesticity. Second, Lever moves beyond the traditional arguments that value privacy because it protects the interests of individuals: what is at stake in protecting privacy is not only individual (...)
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  40. Francesca Pasquali (forthcoming). Juha Räikkä: Social Justice in Practice. Questions in Ethics and Political Philosophy. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
    In Social Justice in Practice, Juha Räikkä addresses a wide variety of subjects, tackling each one with competence and originality. The twelve essays collected in the book cover topics such as the relationship between theory and practice, the impact of “ideal justice” and its requirements on individuals’ expectations, the difficulties connected to the selection of second-best options and the role of presumption rules. In addition, Räikkä focuses on conspiracy theories, on the right to privacy, on the possibility of concealing information (...)
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  41. Duncan Purves, Ryan Jenkins & Bradley J. Strawser (forthcoming). Autonomous Machines, Moral Judgment, and Acting for the Right Reasons. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-22.
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  42. Tom Roberts (forthcoming). Emotional Regulation and Responsibility. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    I argue that one’s responsibility for one’s emotions has a two-fold structure: one bears direct responsibility for emotions insofar as they are the upshot of first-order evaluative judgements concerning reasons of fit; and one bears derivative responsibility for them insofar as they are consequences of activities of emotional self-regulation, which can reflect one’s take on second-order reasons concerning the strategic, prudential, or moral desirability of undergoing a particular emotion in a particular context.
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  43. David Rocheleau-Houle (forthcoming). Julia Markovits: Moral Reason. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
    Julia Markovits’ Moral Reason is a defense of internalism about moral reasons and a desire-based account of reasons for action. Even though she defends this position, she does not consider herself committed to relativism and to a desire-based understanding of what reasons there are. Indeed, it is crucial to make a distinction between two kinds of inquiry about reasons for action. On one side, we find “analytic inquiry” where the purpose is to define what reasons are. On the other, we (...)
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  44. Anders Schinkel (forthcoming). Neera K. Badhwar, Well-Being: Happiness in a Worthwhile Life. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-4.
    It is safe to say that in recent years there has been no dearth of publications on well-being, happiness, and human flourishing. That is true even if we disregard the psychological literature, and focus on philosophy. In 2014 alone, at least two other books have appeared with a similar purpose and purview as Badhwar’s: Paul Bloomfield’s The Virtues of Happiness and Lorraine Besser-Jones’ Eudaimonic Ethics: The Philosophy and Psychology of Living Well . The renaissance of virtue ethics, in particular the (...)
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  45. Yujia Song (forthcoming). How to Be a Proponent of Empathy. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    A growing interest across disciplines in the nature of empathy has sparked a debate over the place of empathy in morality. Proponents are eager to capitalize on the apparent close connection between empathy and altruism, while critics point to serious problems in our exercise of empathy - we are naturally biased, empathize too much or too little, and prone to making all sorts of mistakes in empathizing. The proponents have a promising response, that it is not empathy simpliciter, but empathy (...)
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  46. Mari Stenlund (forthcoming). Is There a Right to Hold a Delusion? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
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  47. Andras Szigeti (forthcoming). Michael E. Bratman: Shared Agency: A Planning Theory of Acting Together. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-4.
    If you have ever had to move house, you will know this: the worst part is the sofa. You cannot do it alone. Nor will it be enough for me to just lift one end waiting for you to lift the other. We will have to work together to get the job done. If spaces are tight, we will even have to find a practical solution to a tantalizing mathematical puzzle: the moving sofa problem.Joint actions like that are part and (...)
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  48. Peter Timmerman (forthcoming). Contractualism and the Significance of Perspective-Taking. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    Many of us think that perspective-taking is relevant to moral judgment. In this paper I claim that Scanlon’s contractualism provides an appealing and distinctive account of why this is so. Contractualism interprets our moral judgments as making claims about the reasons of individuals in various situations, reasons that we can only recognise by considering their perspectives. Contractualism thereby commits itself to the view that our capacity for moral judgment depends on our capacity for perspective-taking. I show that neither utilitarianism nor (...)
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  49. Evan G. Williams (forthcoming). The Possibility of an Ongoing Moral Catastrophe. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-12.
    This article gives two arguments for believing that our society is unknowingly guilty of serious, large-scale wrongdoing. First is an inductive argument: most other societies, in history and in the world today, have been unknowingly guilty of serious wrongdoing, so ours probably is too. Second is a disjunctive argument: there are a large number of distinct ways in which our practices could turn out to be horribly wrong, so even if no particular hypothesized moral mistake strikes us as very likely, (...)
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  50. Andrew Woodhall (forthcoming). Anna L. Peterson: Being Animal: Beasts & Boundaries in Nature Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
    Peterson’s book offers an appraisal of current approaches to environmental and animal ethics and deftly critiques the traditional division between the two fields. Attempts to unite the two fields, Peterson claims, have made little progress. Most have concluded that the divide between the two is irreconcilable, but Peterson argues that the divide is counterintuitive, does not reflect our current practice, and does not represent nature, nonhuman-animals, or humanity, correctly.Throughout the book Peterson attempts to demonstrate why other theories have failed, arguing (...)
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  51. Anthony Wrigley (forthcoming). Moral Authority and Proxy Decision-Making. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    IntroductionExtended decision-making through the use of proxy decision-makers has been enshrined in a range of International Codes, Professional Guidance and Statute,For example, the UK Mental Capacity Act section 9.1; The General Medical Council ; the US National Guardianship Association ; Nuffield Council on Bioethics ; CIOMS-WHO section 6. Court cases such as Re Quinlan in the US have also contributed to establishing the groundings for the legal status of the proxy, albeit in terms of who might be suitable as a (...)
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  52. David Zoller (forthcoming). Moral Responsibility for Distant Collective Harms. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    While it is well recognized that many everyday consumer behaviors, such as purchases of sweatshop goods, come at a cost to the global poor, it has proven difficult to argue that even knowing, repeat contributors are somehow morally complicit in those outcomes. Some recent approaches contend that marginal contributions to distant harms are consequences that consumers straightforwardly should have born in mind, which would make consumers seem reckless or negligent. Critics reasonably reply that the bad luck that my innocent purchase (...)
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