Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Vuko Andric & Attila Tanyi (forthcoming). Multidimensional Consequentialism and Risk. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    . In his new book, The Dimensions of Consequentialism, Martin Peterson proposes a version of multi-dimensional consequentialism according to which risk is one among several dimensions. We argue that Peterson’s treatment of risk is unsatisfactory. More precisely, we want to show that all problems of one-dimensional (objective or subjective) consequentialism are also problems for Peterson’s proposal, although it may fall prey to them less often. In ending our paper, we address the objection that our discussion overlooks the fact that Peterson’s (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ben Bramble (forthcoming). On Susan Wolf's 'Good-For-Nothings'. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.
    In her recent Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, “Good-For-Nothings”, Susan Wolf (2011) argues against welfarism about value by appeal to great works of art, literature, music, and philosophy. Wolf gives three main arguments, which I call The Superfluity Argument, The Explanation of Benefit Argument, and The Welfarist’s Mistake. In this paper, I reconstruct these arguments and explain where, in my view, each goes wrong.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Abraham D. Graber (forthcoming). Towards a Cognitive Scientific Vindication of Moral Realism: The Semantic Argument. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.
    In a methodological milieu characterized by efforts to bring the methods of philosophy closer to the methods of the sciences, one can find, with increasing regularity, meta-ethical arguments relying on scientific theory or data. The received view appears to be that, not only is it implausible to think that a scientific vindication of a non-mentalist moral semantics will be forthcoming but that evidence from a variety of sciences threatens to undermine non-mentalist views. My aim is to push back against this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. François Jaquet & Hichem Naar (forthcoming). Moral Beliefs for the Error Theorist? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    The moral error theory holds that moral claims and beliefs, because they commit us to the existence of illusory entities, are systematically false or untrue. It is an open question what we should do with moral thought and discourse once we have become convinced by this view. Until recently, this question had received two main answers. The abolitionist proposed that we should get rid of moral thought altogether. The fictionalist, though he agreed we should eliminate moral beliefs, enjoined us to (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Fritz J. McDonald (forthcoming). Review of Korsgaard's The Constitution of Agency (2008, OUP). [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Earl Spurgin (forthcoming). An Emotional-Freedom Defense of Schadenfreude. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    Schadenfreude is the emotion we experience when we obtain pleasure from others’ misfortunes. Typically, we are not proud of it and admit experiencing it only sheepishly or apologetically. Philosophers typically view it, and the disposition to experience it, as moral failings. Two recent defenders of Schadenfreude, however, argue that it is morally permissible because it stems from judgments about the just deserts of those who suffer misfortunes. I also defend Schadenfreude, but on different grounds that overcome two deficiencies of those (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Alice Pinheiro Walla (forthcoming). Kant’s Moral Theory and Demandingness. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    In this paper, I sketch a Kantian account of duties of rescue, which I take to be compatible with Kant’s theory. I argue that there is in fact no “trumping relation” between imperfect and perfect duties but merely that “latitude shrinks away” in certain circumstances. Against possible demandingness objections, I explain why Kant thought that imperfect duty must allow latitude for choice and argue that we must understand the necessary space for pursuing one’s own happiness as entailed by Kant’s justification (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. T. J. Kasperbauer (forthcoming). Rejecting Empathy for Animal Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    Ethicists have become increasingly skeptical about the importance of empathy in producing moral concern for others. One of the main claims made by empathy skeptics is a psychological thesis: empathy is not the primary psychological process responsible for producing moral concern. Some of the best evidence that could confirm or disconfirm this thesis comes from research on empathizing with animals. However, this evidence has not been discussed in any of the prominent critiques of empathy. In this paper, I investigate six (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Gesa Lindemann (forthcoming). From the Critique of Judgment to the Principle of the Open Question. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    The relevance of Kant to Plessner’s work was long all but ignored and there is hardly any mention of Plessner in the Kant literature. The Plessner renaissance beginning in the 1990s, however, has brought with it a stronger focus on the methodological construction of his theory, so that the Kant connection has at least been acknowledged, but the particular relevance of Kant’s Critique of Judgement (Kant 1790/2007) has not been systematically explicated. In this essay, I investigate the connection between Kant’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Christopher Morgan-Knapp (forthcoming). Nonconsequentialist Precaution. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    How cautious should regulators be? A standard answer is consequentialist: regulators should be just cautious enough to maximize expected social value. This paper charts the prospects of a nonconsequentialist - and more precautionary - alternative. More specifically, it argues that a contractualism focused on ex ante consent can motivate the following regulatory criterion: regulators should permit a socially beneficial risky activity only if no one can be expected to be made worse off by it. Broadly speaking, there are two strategies (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Sebastian Nye (forthcoming). Real Politics and Metaethical Baggage. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    So-called 'realists' have argued that political philosophers should engage with real politics, but that mainstream 'non-realist' political philosophers fail to do so. Perhaps surprisingly, many of the discussions between realists and their critics have not drawn much on debates in metaethics. In this paper, I argue that this is an oversight. There are important connections between the realism/non-realism debate and certain controversies in metaethics. Both realism and non-realism come with metaethical baggage. By considering several arguments that could be made for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Tammy Harel Ben-Shahar (forthcoming). Equality in Education – Why We Must Go All the Way. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    In this paper I present and defend a highly demanding principle of justice in education that has not been seriously discussed thus far. According to the suggested approach, “all the way equality”, justice in education requires nothing short of equal educational outcome between all individual students. This means not merely between equally able children, or between children from different groups and classes, but rather between all children, regardless of social background, race, sex and ability. This approach may seem implausible at (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Deryck Beyleveld & Paul Ziche (forthcoming). Towards a Kantian Phenomenology of Hope. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    The aim of this paper is to examine the extent to which Kant’s Critique of the Power of Judgment can be, or otherwise ought to be, regarded as a transcendental phenomenology of hope. Kant states repeatedly that CPoJ mediates between the first two Critiques, or between the theoretical knowledge we arrive at on the basis of understanding and reason’s foundational role for practical philosophy. In other words, exercising the power of judgment is implicated whenever we try to bring together the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Giulia Bistagnino (forthcoming). Kevin Vallier, Liberal Politics and Public Faith. Beyond Separation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
    Kevin Vallier’s book, Liberal Politics and Public Faith. Beyond Separation, constitutes an essential reading for anyone interested in public reason liberalism and in the debate concerning the role of religion in contemporary democratic societies. Vallier argues for a strong version of convergence in public justification, aiming at defending an account of liberalism friendly towards religion and religious citizens. Against traditional forms of liberalism built on the idea of neutrality and embodied in a secularized view of social institutions, Vallier’s goal is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Michele Bocchiola (forthcoming). Nicholas Southwood: Contractualism and the Foundations of Morality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
    In the contemporary philosophical debate, there are two opposing contractualist views. On the one side, Hobbesian contractualisms take moral principles as side-constraints to redress the failures of the interaction among self-interested individuals. On the other, Kantian versions of the social contract ground morality on an impartial and moralized viewpoint. In his recent Contractualism and the Foundations of Morality, Nicholas Southwood proposes a third and novel form of contractualism, with the aim to overcome the “implausibly personal and partial characterization of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Samuel Elgin (forthcoming). The Unreliability of Foreseeable Consequences: A Return to the Epistemic Objection. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-8.
    Consequentialists maintain that an act is morally right just in case it produces the best consequences of any available alternative. Because agents are ignorant about some of their acts’ consequences, they cannot be certain about which alternative is best. Kagan contends that it is reasonable to assume that unforeseen good and bad consequences roughly balance out and can be largely disregarded. A statistical argument demonstrates that Kagan’s assumption is almost always false. An act’s foreseeable consequences are an extremely poor indicator (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Christopher Freiman (forthcoming). How Neuroscience Can Vindicate Moral Intuition. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    Imagine that an anthropologist returns from her study of a group of people and reports the following:They refuse to kill one person even to avert the death of all involved—including that one person;They won’t directly push someone to his death to save the lives of five others, but they will push a lever to kill him to save five others;They punish transgressors because it feels right, even when they expect the punishment to cause far more harm than good—and even when (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Katherine E. Furman (forthcoming). Jonathan Matheson, Rico Vitz : The Ethics of Belief. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
    The editors of this collection set out with the intention of extending the debate in the ethics of belief beyond its traditional topics, such as whether it is ever permissible to form beliefs on insufficient evidence, and if pragmatic concerns should play a role in responsible belief formation. The result is that this collection covers an expansive range of material.Some of the topics that are covered are in keeping with the traditional bounds of the literature, such as whether direct doxastic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Luke Gelinas (forthcoming). Frames, Choice-Reversal, and Consent. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-9.
    Recently Jason Hanna has argued that a particular type of susceptibility to framing effects—namely, the tendency to reverse one’s choice between certain logically equivalent frames—invalidates actual tokens of consent. Here I argue that this claim is false: proneness to choice-reversal per se between the relevant types of frames does not invalidate consent.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Mollie Gerver (forthcoming). Consent for Data on Consent. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    There are instances where the provider of an intervention, such as surgery, has failed to obtain necessary informed consent from the recipient of the intervention. Perhaps the surgeon has failed to warn the patient that she may go into a coma, or even be killed, from the surgery. Sometimes, as a result of this intervention, the recipient cannot give informed consent to researchers for the release of their personal data precisely because of the intervention. If they are in a coma, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. John Hacker-Wright (forthcoming). Skill, Practical Wisdom, and Ethical Naturalism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.
    IntroductionRecent work in virtue theory has breathed new life into the analogy between virtue and skill.See, for example, Annas ; Bloomfield ; Stichter ; Swartwood . There is good reason to think that this analogy is worth pursuing since it may help us understand the distinctive nexus of reasoning, knowledge, and practical ability that is found in virtue by pointing to a similar nexus found outside moral contexts in skill. In some ways, there is more than an analogy between skill (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Lisa Herzog (forthcoming). Distributive Justice, Feasibility Gridlocks, and the Harmfulness of Economic Ideology. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    Many political theorists think about how to make societies more just. In recent years, with interests shifting from principles to their institutional realization, there has been much debate about feasibility and the role it should play in theorizing. What has been underexplored, however, is how feasibility depends on the attitudes and perceptions of individuals, not only with regard to their own behaviour, but also with regard to the behaviour of others. This can create coordination problems, which can be described as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Simon P. James (forthcoming). Ecosystem Services and the Value of Places. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    In the US Environmental Protection Agency, the World Wide Fund for Nature and many other environmental organisations, it is standard practice to evaluate particular woods, wetlands and other such places on the basis of the ‘ecosystem services’ they are thought to provide. I argue that this practice cannot account for one important way in which places are of value to human beings. When they play integral roles in our lives, particular places have a kind of value which cannot be adequately (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Rainer Kattel (forthcoming). Brian Leiter and Neil Sinhababu (Eds), Nietzsche and Morality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    Brian Leiter and Neil Sinhababu (eds), Nietzsche and Morality Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10677-008-9134-6 Authors Rainer Kattel, Tallinn University of Technology Ehitajate tee 5 19086 Tallinn Estonia Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Victor Kumar & Richmond Campbell (forthcoming). Honor and Moral Revolution. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    Western philosophers have generally neglected honor as a moral phenomenon worthy of serious study. Appiah’s recent work on honor in moral revolutions is an important exception, but even he is careful to separate honor from morality, regarding it as only “an ally” of morality. In this paper we take Appiah to be right about the psychological, social, and historical role honor has played in three notable moral revolutions, but wrong about the moral nature of honor. We defend two new theses: (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Dominic Martin (forthcoming). There Is No Bathing in River Styx: Rule Manipulation, Performance Downplaying and Adversarial Schemes. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    Adversarial scheme points to situations of rivalry like auctions, public tendering, sports competitions, elections or trials. Thomas Pogge suggested that these schemes have great advantage: they force agents to reveal their full performance. But they also incentivize agents to manipulate the rules. In other schemes with incentives, he also suggests, agents can easily downplay their performance, but won’t engage in rule manipulation to the same extent. In this paper, I will argue that adversarial schemes and other schemes with incentives advantages (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Rafe McGregor (forthcoming). Making Sense of Moral Perception. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that Francis Hutcheson’s moral sense theory offers a satisfactory account of moral perception. I introduce Hutcheson’s work in §1 and indicate why the existence of a sixth sense is not implausible. I provide a summary of Robert Cowan and Robert Audi’s respective theories of evaluative perception in §2, identifying three problematic objections: the Directness Objection to Cowan’s ethical perception and the aesthetic and perceptual model objections to Audi’s moral perception. §3 examines Hutcheson’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. J. P. Messina & Chris W. Surprenant (forthcoming). Situationism and the Neglect of Negative Moral Education. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This paper responds to the recent situationist critique of practical rationality and decision-making. According to that critique, empirical evidence indicates that our choices are governed by morally irrelevant situational factors and not durable character traits, and rarely result from overt rational deliberation. This critique is taken to indicate that popular moral theories in the Western tradition are descriptively deficient, even if normatively plausible or desirable. But we believe that the situationist findings regarding the sources of, or influences over, our moral (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Brent Daniel Mittelstadt, Bernd Carsten Stahl & N. Ben Fairweather (forthcoming). How to Shape a Better Future? Epistemic Difficulties for Ethical Assessment and Anticipatory Governance of Emerging Technologies. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-21.
    Empirical research into the ethics of emerging technologies, often involving foresight studies, technology assessment or application of the precautionary principle, raises significant epistemological challenges by failing to explain the relative epistemic status of contentious normative claims about future states. This weakness means that it is unclear why the conclusions reached by these approaches should be considered valid, for example in anticipatory ethical assessment or governance of emerging technologies. This paper explains and responds to this problem by proposing an account of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Mark T. Nelson (forthcoming). What the Utilitarian Cannot Think. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    I argue that utilitarianism cannot accommodate a basic sort of moral judgment that many people want to make. I raise a real-life example of shockingly bad behavior and ask what can the utilitarian say about it. I concede that the utilitarian can say that this behavior caused pain to the victim; that pain is bad; that the agent’s behavior was impermissible; even that the agent’s treatment of the victim was vicious. However, there is still one thing the utilitarian cannot say, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Adina Preda (forthcoming). Are There Any Conflicts of Rights? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    This paper argues that a putative conflict between negative rights and positive rights is not a genuine conflict. The thought that they might conflict presupposes, I argue, that the two rights are valid. This is the first assumption of my argument. The second is that general rights impose duties on everyone, not just the party who faces a conflict of correlative duties. These two assumptions yield the conclusion that positive rights impose enforceable duties on the holder of the negative right; (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Duncan Purves, Ryan Jenkins & Bradley J. Strawser (forthcoming). Autonomous Machines, Moral Judgment, and Acting for the Right Reasons. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-22.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Benjamin Sachs (forthcoming). Direct Moral Grounding and the Legal Model of Moral Normativity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    Whereas most moral philosophers believe that the facts as to what we’re morally required to do are grounded by the facts about our moral reasons, which in turn are grounded by non-normative facts, I propose that moral requirements are directly grounded by non-normative facts. This isn’t, however, to say that there is no place in the picture for moral reasons. Moral reasons exist, and they’re grounded by moral requirements. Arguing for this picture of the moral sphere requires playing both offense (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Wouter Sanderse (forthcoming). Paul Bloomfield: The Virtues of Happiness. A Theory of the Good Life. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-2.
    “Aristotle is the father of virtue ethics, and virtue ethics is hot”, Howard Curzer states in the introduction of his Aristotle and the virtues . Aristotelian virtue ethics has attracted so much attention that it has become one of the three major approaches in normative ethics since its revival in post-war Anglo-Saxon philosophy. In his new book, Paul Bloomfield is, like these virtue ethicists, not so much interested in the modern ethical question of how to treat others, but in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Anders Schinkel (forthcoming). Neera K. Badhwar, Well-Being: Happiness in a Worthwhile Life. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-4.
    It is safe to say that in recent years there has been no dearth of publications on well-being, happiness, and human flourishing. That is true even if we disregard the psychological literature, and focus on philosophy. In 2014 alone, at least two other books have appeared with a similar purpose and purview as Badhwar’s: Paul Bloomfield’s The Virtues of Happiness and Lorraine Besser-Jones’ Eudaimonic Ethics: The Philosophy and Psychology of Living Well . The renaissance of virtue ethics, in particular the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Mari Stenlund (forthcoming). Is There a Right to Hold a Delusion? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Andras Szigeti (forthcoming). Michael E. Bratman: Shared Agency: A Planning Theory of Acting Together. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-4.
    If you have ever had to move house, you will know this: the worst part is the sofa. You cannot do it alone. Nor will it be enough for me to just lift one end waiting for you to lift the other. We will have to work together to get the job done. If spaces are tight, we will even have to find a practical solution to a tantalizing mathematical puzzle: the moving sofa problem.Joint actions like that are part and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Krista K. Thomason (forthcoming). Guilt and Child Soldiers. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-13.
    The use of child soldiers in armed conflict is an increasing global concern. Although philosophers have examined whether child soldiers can be considered combatants in war, much less attention has been paid to their moral responsibility. While it is tempting to think of them as having diminished or limited responsibility, child soldiers often report feeling guilt for the wrongs they commit. Here I argue that their feelings of guilt are both intelligible and morally appropriate. The feelings of guilt that child (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Demetris Tillyris (forthcoming). After the Standard Dirty Hands Thesis: Towards a Dynamic Account of Dirty Hands in Politics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This essay locates the problem of dirty hands within virtue ethics – specifically Alasdair MacIntyre’s neo-Aristotelian thesis in After Virtue. It demonstrates that, contra contemporary expositions of this problem, MacIntyre’s thesis provides us with a more nuanced account of tragedy and DH in ordinary life, in its conventional understanding as a stark, rare and momentary conflict in which moral wrongdoing is inescapable. The essay then utilizes elements from MacIntyre’s thesis as a theoretical premise for Machiavelli’s thought so as to set (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Peter Timmerman (forthcoming). Contractualism and the Significance of Perspective-Taking. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-17.
    Many of us think that perspective-taking is relevant to moral judgment. In this paper I claim that Scanlon’s contractualism provides an appealing and distinctive account of why this is so. Contractualism interprets our moral judgments as making claims about the reasons of individuals in various situations, reasons that we can only recognise by considering their perspectives. Contractualism thereby commits itself to the view that our capacity for moral judgment depends on our capacity for perspective-taking. I show that neither utilitarianism nor (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Evan G. Williams (forthcoming). The Possibility of an Ongoing Moral Catastrophe. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-12.
    This article gives two arguments for believing that our society is unknowingly guilty of serious, large-scale wrongdoing. First is an inductive argument: most other societies, in history and in the world today, have been unknowingly guilty of serious wrongdoing, so ours probably is too. Second is a disjunctive argument: there are a large number of distinct ways in which our practices could turn out to be horribly wrong, so even if no particular hypothesized moral mistake strikes us as very likely, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Andrew Woodhall (forthcoming). Anna L. Peterson: Being Animal: Beasts & Boundaries in Nature Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
    Peterson’s book offers an appraisal of current approaches to environmental and animal ethics and deftly critiques the traditional division between the two fields. Attempts to unite the two fields, Peterson claims, have made little progress. Most have concluded that the divide between the two is irreconcilable, but Peterson argues that the divide is counterintuitive, does not reflect our current practice, and does not represent nature, nonhuman-animals, or humanity, correctly.Throughout the book Peterson attempts to demonstrate why other theories have failed, arguing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. David Zoller (forthcoming). Moral Responsibility for Distant Collective Harms. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    While it is well recognized that many everyday consumer behaviors, such as purchases of sweatshop goods, come at a cost to the global poor, it has proven difficult to argue that even knowing, repeat contributors are somehow morally complicit in those outcomes. Some recent approaches contend that marginal contributions to distant harms are consequences that consumers straightforwardly should have born in mind, which would make consumers seem reckless or negligent. Critics reasonably reply that the bad luck that my innocent purchase (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues