Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  8
    Carlo Cellucci (forthcoming). Is Mathematics Problem Solving or Theorem Proving? Foundations of Science:1-17.
    The question that is the subject of this article is not intended to be a sociological or statistical question about the practice of today’s mathematicians, but a philosophical question about the nature of mathematics, and specifically the method of mathematics. Since antiquity, saying that mathematics is problem solving has been an expression of the view that the method of mathematics is the analytic method, while saying that mathematics is theorem proving has been an expression of the view that the method (...)
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  2.  11
    Ulrich J. Mohrhoff (forthcoming). Quantum Mechanics in a New Light. Foundations of Science:1-21.
    Although the present paper looks upon the formal apparatus of quantum mechanics as a calculus of correlations, it goes beyond a purely operationalist interpretation. Having established the consistency of the correlations with the existence of their correlata, and having justified the distinction between a domain in which outcome-indicating events occur and a domain whose properties only exist if their existence is indicated by such events, it explains the difference between the two domains as essentially the difference between the manifested world (...)
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  3.  51
    Seungbae Park (forthcoming). Realism Versus Surrealism. Foundations of Science:1-12.
    Realism and surrealism claim, respectively, that a scientific theory is successful because it is true, and because the world operates as if it is true. Lyons (2003) criticizes realism and argues that surrealism is superior to realism. I reply that Lyons’s criticisms against realism fail. I also attempt to establish the following two claims: 1. Realism and surrealism lead to a useful prescription and a useless prescription, respectively, on how to make an unsuccessful theory successful. 2. Realism and surrealism give (...)
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  4.  78
    Seungbae Park (forthcoming). Why Should We Be Pessimistic About Antirealists and Pessimists? Foundations of Science:1-13.
    The pessimistic induction over scientific theories (Poincaré, 1905/1952) holds that present theories will be overthrown as were past theories. The pessimistic induction over scientists (Stanford, 2006) holds that present scientists cannot conceive of future theories just as past scientists could not conceive of present theories. The pessimistic induction over realists (Wray, 2013) holds that present realists are wrong about present theories just as past realists were wrong about past theories. The pessimistic induction over antirealist theories (Park, 2014) holds that the (...)
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  5.  3
    Galit Wellner (forthcoming). Ethics in Times of Posthumanism. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    This commentary is an attempt to rethink the ethics of taking care in posthumanist times. It is an effort to combine ethics, posthumanism and psychological theories. I examine how the psychological notion of long-term well-being can serve as an ethical yardstick and how it can be relevant to non-humans.
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  6.  11
    Antti Hautamäki (forthcoming). Points of View: A Conceptual Space Approach. Foundations of Science:1-18.
    Points of view are a central phenomenon in human cognition. Although the concept of point of view is ambiguous, there exist common elements in different notions. A point of view is a certain way to look at things around us. In conceptual points of view, things are looked at or interpreted through conceptual lenses. Conceptual points of view are important for epistemology, cognitive science, and philosophy of science. In this article, a new method to formalize conceptual points of view is (...)
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  7.  11
    Robert W. P. Luk (forthcoming). A Theory of Scientific Study. Foundations of Science:1-28.
    This paper presents a theory of scientific study which is regarded as a social learning process of scientific knowledge creation, revision, application, monitoring and dissemination with the aim of securing good quality, general, objective, testable and complete scientific knowledge of the domain. The theory stipulates the aim of scientific study that forms the basis of its principles. It also makes seven assumptions about scientific study and defines the major participating entities. It extends a recent process model of scientific study into (...)
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  8. D. Aerts & L. Gabora (forthcoming). Towards a General Theory of Evolution. Foundations of Science.
     
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  9.  3
    Ian Angus (forthcoming). Critical Theory of Digital Media. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    Recalling the phenomenological and Hegelian bases of the critique of misplaced concreteness, and supplementing these by the contribution of Gregory Bateson, it is possible to say that a contemporary critique of digital media cannot appeal to an irrevocable concreteness nor finally defeat abstraction. Since the digital media complex is characterized by temporal decay, transversality, and singularity, a new departure for a critical theory of digital media must centre on the cultural unconscious and the limit, or edge, of the cultural complex.
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  10.  1
    Corey Anton (forthcoming). How Bridges and Walls Grow Out of Abstractions. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    This brief commentary on Yoni Van Den Eede’s rumination, “Concrete/,” explores residual conceptual ambiguities and raises questions about information technologies and the felt sense of primacy regarding selves and communities.
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  11.  2
    Babette Babich (forthcoming). Heidegger on Verfallenheit. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    The question of Heidegger’s reflections on technology is explored in terms of ‘living with’ technology and including the socio-theoretical notion of ‘entanglement’ towards a review of Heidegger’s understanding of technology and media, including the entertainment industry and modern digital life. I explore Heidegger’s reflections on Gelassenheit by way of the Japanese aesthetic conception of life and of art as wabi-sabi understood with respect to Heidegger’s Gelassenheit as the art of Verfallenheit.
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  12.  10
    David L. Bergman (forthcoming). Conflict of Atomism and Creation-Science in History. Foundations of Science.
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  13.  13
    David L. Bergman (forthcoming). Modeling the Real Structure of an Electron. Foundations of Science.
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  14.  14
    David L. Bergman (forthcoming). Commentary on Sub-Quantum Physics. Foundations of Science.
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  15.  15
    David L. Bergman (forthcoming). Science of Origins. Foundations of Science.
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  16. David L. Bergman (forthcoming). Nuclear Binding and Half-Lives. Foundations of Science.
     
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  17.  12
    David L. Bergman & Dennis P. Allen Jr (forthcoming). Electron in the Ground Energy State—Part. Foundations of Science.
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  18.  1
    Mario Bunge (forthcoming). Evaluating Scientific Research Projects: The Units of Science in the Making. Foundations of Science:1-15.
    Original research is of course what scientists are expected to do. Therefore the research project is in many ways the unit of science in the making: it is the center of the professional life of the individual scientist and his coworkers. It is also the means towards the culmination of their specific activities: the original publication they hope to contribute to the scientific literature. The scientific project should therefore be of central interest to all the students of science, particularly the (...)
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  19.  7
    Mario Bunge (forthcoming). Why Axiomatize? Foundations of Science:1-13.
    Axiomatization is uncommon outside mathematics, partly for being often viewed as embalming, partly because the best-known axiomatizations have serious shortcomings, and partly because it has had only one eminent champion, namely David Hilbert. The aims of this paper are to describe what will be called dual axiomatics, for it concerns not just the formalism, but also the meaning of the key concepts; and to suggest that every instance of dual axiomatics presupposes some philosophical view or other. To illustrate these points, (...)
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  20.  1
    Piotr Błaszczyk, Vladimir Kanovei, Karin U. Katz, Mikhail G. Katz, Taras Kudryk, Thomas Mormann & David Sherry (forthcoming). Is Leibnizian Calculus Embeddable in First Order Logic? Foundations of Science:1-15.
    To explore the extent of embeddability of Leibnizian infinitesimal calculus in first-order logic and modern frameworks, we propose to set aside ontological issues and focus on procedural questions. This would enable an account of Leibnizian procedures in a framework limited to FOL with a small number of additional ingredients such as the relation of infinite proximity. If, as we argue here, first order logic is indeed suitable for developing modern proxies for the inferential moves found in Leibnizian infinitesimal calculus, then (...)
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  21.  1
    Piotr Błaszczyk, Vladimir Kanovei, Mikhail G. Katz & David Sherry (forthcoming). Controversies in the Foundations of Analysis: Comments on Schubring’s Conflicts. Foundations of Science:1-16.
    Foundations of Science recently published a rebuttal to a portion of our essay it published 2 years ago. The author, G. Schubring, argues that our 2013 text treated unfairly his 2005 book, Conflicts between generalization, rigor, and intuition. He further argues that our attempt to show that Cauchy is part of a long infinitesimalist tradition confuses text with context and thereby misunderstands the significance of Cauchy’s use of infinitesimals. Here we defend our original analysis of various misconceptions and misinterpretations concerning (...)
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  22.  17
    Cristian S. Calude & Giuseppe Longo (forthcoming). The Deluge of Spurious Correlations in Big Data. Foundations of Science:1-18.
    Very large databases are a major opportunity for science and data analytics is a remarkable new field of investigation in computer science. The effectiveness of these tools is used to support a “philosophy” against the scientific method as developed throughout history. According to this view, computer-discovered correlations should replace understanding and guide prediction and action. Consequently, there will be no need to give scientific meaning to phenomena, by proposing, say, causal relations, since regularities in very large databases are enough: “with (...)
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  23.  1
    Erik Claes & Nicole Note (forthcoming). Introduction. Meaningfulness, Volunteers, Citizenship. Foundations of Science:1-15.
    This introductory article starts by describing the genesis of this special issue and the interconnection of its topics. The editors offer a variety of reading entries into the key-note articles and responses. The article reconstructs the research interests underpinning the idea of integrating meaningfulness, volunteers and citizenship. It highlights the explicit interdisciplinary design of the special issue, and shows how the key-note authors, and their respondents, weave connections between meaningfulness, volunteering and citizenship. And, finally, the editors bring the background understandings (...)
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  24.  6
    Mark Coeckelbergh (forthcoming). The Art of Living with ICTs: The Ethics–Aesthetics of Vulnerability Coping and Its Implications for Understanding and Evaluating ICT Cultures. Foundations of Science:1-10.
    This essay shows that a sharp distinction between ethics and aesthetics is unfruitful for thinking about how to live well with technologies, and in particular for understanding and evaluating how we cope with human existential vulnerability, which is crucially mediated by the development and use of technologies such as electronic ICTs. It is argued that vulnerability coping is a matter of ethics and art: it requires developing a kind of art and techne in the sense that it always involves technologies (...)
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  25.  3
    Mark Coeckelbergh (forthcoming). Hacking Technological Practices and the Vulnerability of the Modern Hero. Foundations of Science:1-6.
    This reply to Gunkel and Zwart further reflects on, and responds to, the following main points: the Heideggerian character of my view and the potential link to Kafka, the suggestion that we should become hackers, the interpretation of my approach in terms of the Hegelian Master–Slave dialectic, the lack of an empirical dimension, and the claim that I think that modern heroism entails overcoming vulnerability. I acknowledge Heideggerian influence, reflect on what it could mean to think about living with ICTs (...)
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  26.  22
    Nathan Cofnas (forthcoming). Science Is Not Always “Self-Correcting”. Foundations of Science:1-16.
    Some prominent scientists and philosophers have stated openly that moral and political considerations should influence whether we accept or promulgate scientific theories. This widespread view has significantly influenced the development, and public perception, of intelligence research. Theories related to group differences in intelligence are often rejected a priori on explicitly moral grounds. Thus the idea, frequently expressed by commentators on science, that science is “self-correcting”—that hypotheses are simply abandoned when they are undermined by empirical evidence—may not be correct in all (...)
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  27.  8
    Ricardo Crespo & Fernando Tohmé (forthcoming). The Future of Mathematics in Economics: A Philosophically Grounded Proposal. Foundations of Science:1-17.
    The use of mathematics in economics has been widely discussed. The philosophical discussion on what mathematics is remains unsettled on why it can be applied to the study of the real world. We propose to get back to some philosophical conceptions that lead to a language-like role for the mathematical analysis of economic phenomena and present some problems of interest that can be better examined in this light. Category theory provides the appropriate tools for these analytical approach.
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  28.  2
    Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi (forthcoming). Theoretical and Conceptual Analysis of the Celebrated 4π-Symmetry Neutron Interferometry Experiments. Foundations of Science:1-27.
    In 1975, two experimental groups have independently observed the \-symmetry of neutrons’ spin, when passing through a static magnetic field, using a three-blade interferometer made from a single perfect Si-crystal. In this article, we provide a complete analysis of the experiment, both from a theoretical and conceptual point of view. Firstly, we solve the Schrödinger equation in the weak potential approximation, to obtain the amplitude of the refracted and forward refracted beams, produced by the passage of neutrons through one of (...)
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  29.  3
    Steven Dorrestijn (forthcoming). The Uses of Reason in Times of Technical Mediation. Foundations of Science:1-5.
    The art of living idiom suits well a practice-oriented approach in ethics of technology. But what remains or becomes of the functioning and use of reason in ethics? In reaction to the comments by Huijer this reply elaborates in more detail how Foucault’s art of living can be adapted for a critical contemporary ethics of technology. And the aesthetic-political rationality in Foucault’s ethics is compared with Wellner’s suggestions of holding on to the notion of code but with a new meaning. (...)
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  30.  4
    Steven Dorrestijn (forthcoming). The Care of Our Hybrid Selves: Ethics in Times of Technical Mediation. Foundations of Science:1-11.
    What can the art of living after Foucault contribute to ethics in relation to the mediation of human existence by technology? To develop the relation between technical mediation and ethics, firstly the theme of technical mediation is elaborated in line with Foucault’s notion of ethical problematization. Every view of what technology does to us at the same time expresses an ethical concern about technology. The contemporary conception of technical mediation tends towards the acknowledgement of ongoing hybridization, not ultimately good or (...)
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  31.  4
    Andrew Feenberg (forthcoming). Beyond the Hype. Foundations of Science:1-3.
    In this reply I discuss Ellen Rose’s observations on online education as she has practiced it and Evan Selinger’s concerns about the introduction of big data in the university. Both authors are in agreement that neo-liberalism is restructuring the university, but add new considerations to the argument.
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  32.  9
    Andrew Feenberg (forthcoming). The Online Education Controversy and the Future of the University. Foundations of Science:1-9.
    The neo-liberal reform of the university has had a huge impact on higher education and promises still more changes in the future. Many of these changes have had a negative impact on academic careers, values, and the educational experience. Educational technology plays an important role in the defense of neo-liberal reform, less through actual accomplishment than as a rhetorical justification for supposed “progress.” This paper outlines the main claims and consequences of this rhetorical strategy and its actual effects on the (...)
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  33.  1
    Thomas Görnitz (forthcoming). A Century of Quantum Theory: Time for a Change in Thinking. Foundations of Science:1-14.
    The aim of science is the explanation of complicated systems by reducing it to simple subsystems. According to a millennia-old imagination this will be attained by dividing matter into smaller and smaller pieces of it. The popular superstition that smallness implies simplicity seems to be ineradicable. However, since the beginning of quantum theory it would be possible to realize that the circumstances in nature are exactly the other way round. The idea “smaller becomes simpler” is useful only down to the (...)
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  34.  2
    David J. Gunkel (forthcoming). Better Living Through Technology. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    In this brief response to Mark Coeckelbergh’s contribution, I demonstrate how the author introduces an important shift in the way we approach technology. Instead of focusing on the new and often-times dramatic existential vulnerabilities supposedly introduced by technological innovation, Coeckelbergh targets the way technology already transforms our existential vulnerabilities. And I show how this shift in focus has three very important consequences: a different way to ask about and investigate the question concerning technology, the importance of hacking as a mode (...)
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  35.  2
    Alexander E. Gutman, Mikhail G. Katz, Taras S. Kudryk & Semen S. Kutateladze (forthcoming). The Mathematical Intelligencer Flunks the Olympics. Foundations of Science:1-17.
    The Mathematical Intelligencer recently published a note by Y. Sergeyev that challenges both mathematics and intelligence. We examine Sergeyev’s claims concerning his purported Infinity computer. We compare his grossone system with the classical Levi-Civita fields and with the hyperreal framework of A. Robinson, and analyze the related algorithmic issues inevitably arising in any genuine computer implementation. We show that Sergeyev’s grossone system is unnecessary and vague, and that whatever consistent subsystem could be salvaged is subsumed entirely within a stronger and (...)
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  36.  5
    Rubén Herce (forthcoming). Penrose on What Scientists Know. Foundations of Science:1-16.
    This paper presents an analysis and critique of Roger Penrose’s epistemological, methodological, and ontological positions. The analysis is relevant not only because Penrose is an influential scientist, but also because of the particular traits of his thought. These traits are directly connected with his background and approach to science: ontological and epistemological realism, mathematical Platonism, emphasis on the continuities of science, epistemological inclusiveness and essential openness of science, the role of common sense, emphasis on the connection between science, ethics, and (...)
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  37.  1
    Marli Huijer (forthcoming). A Critical Use of Foucault’s Art of Living. Foundations of Science:1-5.
    Foucault’s vocabulary of arts of existence might be helpful to problematize the entwinement of humans and technology and to search for new types of hybrid selves. However, to be a serious new ethical vocabulary for technology, this art of existence should be supplemented with an ongoing critical discourse of technologies, including a critical analysis of the subjectivities imposed by technologies, and should be supplemented with new medical and philosophical regimens for an appropriate use of technologies.
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  38.  4
    R. Humberto Maturana, Ximena Dávila Yáñez & Simón Ramírez Muñoz (forthcoming). Cultural-Biology: Systemic Consequences of Our Evolutionary Natural Drift as Molecular Autopoietic Systems. Foundations of Science:1-48.
    Our purpose in this essay is to introduce new concepts in a wide and recursive view of the systemic consequences of the following biological facts that I and we have presented that can be resumed as: that as living systems we human beings are molecular autopoietic system; that living systems live only as long as they find themselves in a medium that provides them with all the conditions that make the realization of their living possible, that is, in the continuous (...)
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  39.  2
    Ike Kamphof (forthcoming). A Modest Art: Securing Privacy in Technologically Mediated Homecare. Foundations of Science:1-9.
    This article addresses the art of living in a technological culture as the active engagement with technomoral change. It argues that this engagement does not just take the form of overt deliberation. It shows in more modest ways as reflection-in-action, an experimental process in which new technology is fitted into existing practices. In this process challenged values are re-articulated in pragmatic solutions to the problem of working with new technology. This art of working with technology is also modest in the (...)
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  40.  2
    Ike Kamphof (forthcoming). Whose Art Are We Talking About? Foundations of Science:1-4.
    Jeannette Pols and Tamar Sharon kindly reviewed my case study of the art of living with technology as an engagement with technomoral change. I am indebted to them for their careful reading and critical suggestions to further elaborate the project. In my response I focus on the question whose art we are talking about, while further elucidating the reflexivity addressed in my essay. I conclude with some remarks on what we can learn from micro studies like the one presented for (...)
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  41.  2
    Harry Kunneman (forthcoming). The Political Importance of Voluntary Work. Foundations of Science:1-20.
    This paper aims to develop a complex articulation of the civic meaningfulness of voluntary work that clarifies its political importance as a countervailing narrative pointing beyond dominant neoliberal and consumptive articulations of a good life. To start with, it sketches a hermeneutic perspective on civic meaningfulness based on the work of Paul Ricoeur. Subsequently, it introduces the ideas of ‘ethical complexity’, ‘epistemological complexity’ and ‘diapoiesis’, building on insights from critical complexity thinking and relational biology. It argues that these notions can (...)
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  42.  3
    Cadell Last (forthcoming). Big Historical Foundations for Deep Future Speculations: Cosmic Evolution, Atechnogenesis, and Technocultural Civilization. Foundations of Science:1-86.
    Big historians are attempting to construct a general holistic narrative of human origins enabling an approach to studying the emergence of complexity, the relation between evolutionary processes, and the modern context of human experience and actions. In this paper I attempt to explore the past and future of cosmic evolution within a big historical foundation characterized by physical, biological, and cultural eras of change. From this analysis I offer a model of the human future that includes an addition and/or reinterpretation (...)
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  43.  5
    Pieter Lemmens (forthcoming). Social Autonomy and Heteronomy in the Age of ICT: The Digital Pharmakon and the Empowerment of the General Intellect. Foundations of Science:1-10.
    ‘The art of living with ICTs ’ today not only means finding new ways to cope, interact and create new lifestyles on the basis of the new digital technologies individually, as ‘consumer-citizens’. It also means inventing new modes of living, producing and, not in the least place, struggling collectively, as workers and producers. As the so-called digital revolution unfolds in the context of a neoliberal cognitive and consumerist capitalism, its ‘innovations’ are predominantly employed to modulate and control both production processes (...)
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  44.  3
    Pieter Lemmens (forthcoming). Love and Realism. Foundations of Science:1-6.
    In this reply I try to show that, contrary to Milberry’s apparent assertion, the general intellect of the multitude does not have the explanatory robustness she accredits to it. Digital network technologies are currently overwhelmingly effective in proletarianizing and disempowering the cognitariat and only an active technopolitics of deproletarianization could reverse this hegemonic situation. In my response to Verbeek, I attempt to correct his misinterpretation of the Stieglerian approach as being dialectical in nature and show that, far from reinstating the (...)
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  45.  1
    Michael Lissack (forthcoming). What Second Order Science Reveals About Scientific Claims: Incommensurability, Doubt, and a Lack of Explication. Foundations of Science:1-19.
    The traditional sciences often bracket away ambiguity through the imposition of “enabling constraints”—making a set of assumptions and then declaring ceteris paribus. These enabling constraints take the form of uncritically examined presuppositions or “uceps.” Second order science reveals hidden issues, problems and assumptions which all too often escape the attention of the practicing scientist. These hidden values—precisely because they are hidden and not made explicit—can get in the way of the public’s acceptance of a scientific claim. A conflict in understood (...)
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  46.  3
    Michael Lissack (forthcoming). Second Order Science: Examining Hidden Presuppositions in the Practice of Science. Foundations of Science:1-17.
    The traditional sciences have always had trouble with ambiguity. To overcome this barrier, ‘science’ has imposed “enabling constraints”—hidden assumptions which are given the status of ceteris paribus. Such assumptions allow ambiguity to be bracketed away at the expense of transparency. These enabling constraints take the form of uncritically examined presuppositions, which we refer to throughout the article as “uceps.” The meanings of the various uceps are shown via their applicability to the science of climate change. Second order science examines variations (...)
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  47.  12
    Charles W. Lucas Jr (forthcoming). Creationists Should Not Accept Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Science.
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  48.  6
    Charles W. Lucas Jr (forthcoming). Union of Euclid's Axiomatic Method with Newton's Empirical Scientific Method Leads to an Improved Electrodynamic Force. Foundations of Science.
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  49.  13
    Charles W. Lucas Jr (forthcoming). The Symmetry and Beauty of the Universe. Foundations of Science.
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  50.  20
    Charles W. Lucas Jr (forthcoming). A Physical Model for Atoms and Nuclei—Part 4. Foundations of Science.
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  51.  5
    Charles William Bill Lucas Jr & Joseph J. Smulsky (forthcoming). New Solar System Force, Decay of Gravity, and Expansion of the Solar System. Foundations of Science.
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  52.  1
    Kate Milberry (forthcoming). The Art of Collectively Loving Well in the Digital Age. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    In this response to Pieter Lemmens’ post-autonomist evaluation of the liberatory potential of digital network technologies, Kate Milberry finds the concept of pharmakon as a diagnostic to uncover what ails the worker in technocapitalism wanting. Through an exploration of Marxian concepts and critical theory of technology, she explores ways to augment political responses to capitalist exploitation in the digital age. Milberry concludes that it is not possible to change the sociotechnical foundation of contemporary life until we fundamentally alter the capitalist (...)
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  53.  9
    Alan Montgomery (forthcoming). The God Particle. Foundations of Science.
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  54.  1
    Nicole Note & Emilie Van Daele (forthcoming). Meaningfulness, Volunteering and Being Moved: The Event of Witnessing. Foundations of Science:1-18.
    This paper draws on an in-depth phenomenological analysis of some interviews taken from volunteers, inviting them to reflect on their lived experiences of meaningfulness in the context of volunteering and citizenship. It is found that while some testimonies reinforce the standard conceptions of meaningfulness, other testimonies vary from it. The main challenge of this contribution consists in phenomenologically describing this alternative picture of meaningfulness, depicted as the event of witnessing. In a final part, the authors consider how volunteering is at (...)
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  55.  2
    Nicole Note & Emilie Van Daele (forthcoming). Meaningfulness, Volunteering and Being Moved: The Event of Witnessing. Foundations of Science:1-18.
    This paper draws on an in-depth phenomenological analysis of some interviews taken from volunteers, inviting them to reflect on their lived experiences of meaningfulness in the context of volunteering and citizenship. It is found that while some testimonies reinforce the standard conceptions of meaningfulness, other testimonies vary from it. The main challenge of this contribution consists in phenomenologically describing this alternative picture of meaningfulness, depicted as the event of witnessing. In a final part, the authors consider how volunteering is at (...)
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  56.  2
    Jun-Young Oh (forthcoming). Understanding Scientific Inquiries of Galileo’s Formulation for the Law of Free Falling Motion. Foundations of Science:1-12.
    The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of the role of abstraction and idealization in Galileo’s scientific inquiries into the law of free falling motion, and their importance in the history of science. Because there is no consensus on the use of the terms “abstraction” and “idealization” in the literature, it is necessary to distinguish between them at the outset. This paper will argue for the importance of abstraction and idealization in physics and the theories and (...)
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  57.  1
    Erik Paredis (forthcoming). Which Wisdom Can Change the World? Foundations of Science:1-4.
    The thoughts that Michel Puech formulates on wisdom, technology and the art of living are timely at a moment when social, ecological and economic problems are pressing upon our societies and the speed of technological development seems to overwhelm our ability to integrate and adapt new technologies in our lives and societies. However, he restricts his concept of wisdom too much to a personal endeavor and overestimates the relevance of non-confrontation. I argue that his project can only be of value (...)
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  58.  11
    Woosuk Park (forthcoming). What If Haecceity is Not a Property? Foundations of Science:1-16.
    In some sense, both ontological and epistemological problems related to individuation have been the focal issues in the philosophy of mathematics ever since Frege. However, such an interest becomes manifest in the rise of structuralism as one of the most promising positions in recent philosophy of mathematics. The most recent controversy between Keränen and Shapiro seems to be the culmination of this phenomenon. Rather than taking sides, in this paper, I propose to critically examine some common assumptions shared by both (...)
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  59.  4
    Woosuk Park (forthcoming). A Possible Dilemma for Situation Semanticists. Foundations of Science:1-22.
    This paper examines the concept of information in situation semantics. For this purpose the most fundamental principles of situation semantics are classified into three groups: principles of the more fundamental kind, principles related to regularity, and principles governing incremental information. Fodor’s well-known criticisms of situation semanticists’ concepts of information target the first group. Interestingly, situation semanticists have been anxious to articulate either the principles of the second group or the principles of the third group in order to meet these criticisms. (...)
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  60.  8
    Ulf Persson (forthcoming). Is Falsification Falsifiable? Foundations of Science:1-15.
    This is a response to a claim by Sven Ove Hansson to the effect that Poppers dictum that falsification lies at the heart of all pursuit of science has once and for all been falsified by his study of articles published in Nature during the year 2000. We claim that this is based on a misunderstanding of Poppers philosophy of science interpreting it too literally, and that alternative readings of those papers are fully compliant with falsification. We scrutinize Hansson’s arguments (...)
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  61. Henri Poincaré (forthcoming). Space and Geometry. Foundations of Science.
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  62.  2
    Jeannette Pols (forthcoming). How to Make Your Relationship Work? Aesthetic Relations with Technology. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    Discussing the workings of technology in care as aesthetic rather than as ethical or epistemological interventions focusses on how technologies engage in and change relations between those involved. Such an aesthetic study opens up a repertoire to address values that are abundant in care, but are as yet hardly theorized. Kamphof studies the problem that sensor technology reveals things about the elderly patients without the patients being aware of this. I suggest improvement of these relations may be considered in aesthetic (...)
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  63.  2
    Søren Riis (forthcoming). Information and Communication Technology Inside Out: From Hype to Literacy. Foundations of Science:1-5.
    Information and communication technology has become the great technological fix of our time and not the least in the education system. There seems to be no end to the hype of ICT and the accompanying promises that education will be revolutionized—“smart” pupils will be made and the so-called knowledge society propelled. This master narrative has many co-authors, some of whom have the best intentions and realize the big challenge of educating the world population. In response to the two insightful reviews (...)
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  64.  3
    Søren Riis (forthcoming). ICT Literacy: An Imperative of the Twenty-First Century. Foundations of Science:1-10.
    The entanglement of ethics and technology makes it necessary for us to understand and reflect upon our own practices and to question technological hypes. The information and communication technology literacy required to navigate the twenty-first century has to do with recognizing our own human limitations, developing critical measures and acknowledging feelings of estrangement, puzzlement as well as sheer wonder of technology. ICT literacy is indeed all about visions of the good life and the art of living in the twenty-first century. (...)
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  65.  7
    Gustavo E. Romero (forthcoming). Sufficient Reason and Reason Enough. Foundations of Science:1-6.
    I offer an analysis of the Principle of Sufficient Reason and its relevancy for the scientific endeavour. I submit that the world is not, and cannot be, rational—only some brained beings are. The Principle of Sufficient Reason is not a necessary truth nor a physical law. It is just a guiding metanomological hypothesis justified a posteriori by its success in helping us to unveil the mechanisms that operate in Nature.
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  66.  6
    Gustavo E. Romero (forthcoming). On the Ontology of Spacetime: Substantivalism, Relationism, Eternalism, and Emergence. Foundations of Science:1-19.
    I present a discussion of some issues in the ontology of spacetime. After a characterisation of the controversies among relationists, substantivalists, eternalists, and presentists, I offer a new argument for rejecting presentism, the doctrine that only present objects exist. Then, I outline and defend a form of spacetime realism that I call event substantivalism. I propose an ontological theory for the emergence of spacetime from more basic entities. Finally, I argue that a relational theory of pre-geometric entities can give rise (...)
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  67.  2
    Ellen Rose (forthcoming). Cause for Optimism: Engaging in a Vital Conversation About Online Learning. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    This commentary responds to the suggestion that we can humanize online university education through the design decisions we make about it. It offers several reasons why the suggestion may be unrealistic, given that choice in online course design is increasingly narrowed by the prevalence of relatively powerless part-time instructors, student preference for convenient online offerings, and the use of learning management systems. However, if our design decisions are constrained, it becomes all the more important that we engage in critical conversations (...)
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  68.  2
    Robert Rosenberger (forthcoming). The ICT Educator’s Fallacy. Foundations of Science:1-5.
    This paper develops the notion of “the ICT educator’s fallacy” to point to the mistaken assumption that devices introduced into the classroom will have the precise effects on educational experience expected by designers and curriculum developers. This notion allows for an expansion and refinement of the insights into the imperatives of twenty-first century education set out by Søren Riis.
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  69.  8
    Robert Rosenberger (forthcoming). Notes on a Nonfoundational Phenomenology of Technology. Foundations of Science:1-24.
    The emerging school of thought called “postphenomenology” offers a distinct understanding of the ways that people experience technology usage. This perspective combines insights from the philosophical tradition of phenomenology with commitments to the anti-essentialism and nonfoundationalism of American pragmatism. One of postphenomenology’s central positions is that technologies always remain “multistable,” i.e., subject to different uses and meanings. But I suggest that as this perspective matures, philosophical problems are emerging around the notion of multistability, what I call “the problem of invariance” (...)
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  70.  32
    Howard Sankey (forthcoming). Realism, Progress and the Historical Turn. Foundations of Science:1-14.
    The contemporary debate between scientific realism and anti-realism is conditioned by a polarity between two opposing arguments: the realist’s success argument and the anti-realist’s pessimistic induction. This polarity has skewed the debate away from the problem that lies at the source of the debate. From a realist point of view, the historical approach to the philosophy of science which came to the fore in the 1960s gave rise to an unsatisfactory conception of scientific progress. One of the main motivations for (...)
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  71.  2
    Robert C. Scharff (forthcoming). On Living with Technology Through Renunciation and Releasement. Foundations of Science:1-6.
    Marc Van den Bosche suggests that Heidegger’s conceptions of Gestell and Gelassenheit, taken together with his analysis of Nietzschean Nihilism, depicts our era in a way that “supplements” Andrew Feenberg and Don Ihde’s work. Weaving these sources together, he sees the possibility of our becoming “technicians” that “live, in a released way, within the groundless.” Here, I raise some questions about whether the author has really fitted all these sources together and argue that his idea of becoming post-modern “technicians” appears (...)
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  72. Christophe Schinckus (forthcoming). From Cubist Simultaneity to Quantum Complementarity. Foundations of Science:1-8.
    This article offers a contribution to the history of scientific ideas by proposing an epistemological argument supporting the assumption made by Miller whereby Niels Bohr has been influenced by cubism when he developed his non-intuitive complementarity principle. More specifically, this essay will identify the Bergsonian durée as the conceptual bridge between Metzinger and Bohr. Beyond this conceptual link between the painter and the physicist, this paper aims to emphasize the key role played by art in the development of human knowledge.
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  73.  6
    Gert Schubring (forthcoming). Comments on a Paper on Alleged Misconceptions Regarding the History of Analysis: Who Has Misconceptions? Foundations of Science:1-6.
    This comment is analysing the last section of a paper by Piotr Blaszczyk, Mikhail G. Katz, and David Sherry on alleged misconceptions committed by historians of mathematics regarding the history of analysis, published in this journal in the first issue of 2013. Since this section abounds of wrong attributions and denouncing statements regarding my research and a key publication, the comment serves to rectify them and to recall some minimal methodological requirements for historical research.
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  74.  3
    Evan Selinger (forthcoming). Neo-Liberal Reform and the Big Data University. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    Andrew Feenberg has taken issue with the “neo-liberal agenda” that is currently guiding how far too many universities both conceptualize and use “educational technology.” In this article, I expand the scope of his critical discussion to include analysis of contemporary higher education initiatives that capitalize on big data.
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  75.  4
    Tamar Sharon (forthcoming). Towards a Phenomenology of Technologically Mediated Moral Change: Or, What Could Mark Zuckerberg Learn From Caregivers in the Southern Netherlands? Foundations of Science:1-4.
    Kamphof offers an illuminating depiction of the technological mediation of morality. Her case serves as the basis for a plea for modesty up and against the somewhat heroic conceptualizations of techno-moral change to date—less logos, less autos, more practice, more relationality. Rather than a displacement of these conceptualizations, I question whether Kamphof’s art of living offers only a different perspective: in scale, and in unit of analysis. As a supplement and not an alternative, this modest art has nonetheless audacious implications (...)
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  76.  2
    Tsjalling Swierstra (forthcoming). Does an Old Art Suffice for New Problems? Foundations of Science:1-4.
    In this review I argue that Puech draws on two important currents in modern thought: the criticism of the ontological and social priority of conflict, and the rehabilitation of praxis vis-à-vis theoria. Still, his plea for a non-confrontational art of living leaves important questions unanswered. What is the problem exactly? What does exactly count as confrontational? What is non-confrontation exactly meant to solve? What is the antiposition here? And: how does this new art of living relate to the political and (...)
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  77.  1
    Oliver Todt & José Luis Luján (forthcoming). Non-Cognitive Values and Methodological Learning in the Decision-Oriented Sciences. Foundations of Science:1-20.
    The function and legitimacy of values in decision making is a critically important issue in the contemporary analysis of science. It is particularly relevant for some of the more application-oriented areas of science, specifically decision-oriented science in the field of regulation of technological risks. Our main objective in this paper is to assess the diversity of roles that non-cognitive values related to decision making can adopt in the kinds of scientific activity that underlie risk regulation. We start out, first, by (...)
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  78.  5
    Alain Ulazia (forthcoming). Multiple Roles for Analogies in the Genesis of Fluid Mechanics: How Analogies Can Cooperate with Other Heuristic Strategies. Foundations of Science:1-23.
    When Johann and Daniel Bernoulli founded fluid dynamics they encountered several problems. To go beyond the vision of Newtonian particles, a new set of images was needed in order to deal with the spatial extensibility and lack of form of fluids. I point to evidence that analogy was an essential abductive strategy in the creation of this imagery. But its heuristic behavior is complex: analogy can provide an initial model or proto-model that establishes the starting point of a theoretical process, (...)
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  79.  5
    José-Luis Usó-Doménech, Josué Antonio Nescolarde-Selva, Mónica Belmonte-Requena & L. Segura-Abad (forthcoming). Mathematics, Philosophical and Semantic Considerations on Infinity : Dialectical Vision. Foundations of Science:1-20.
    Human language has the characteristic of being open and in some cases polysemic. The word “infinite” is used often in common speech and more frequently in literary language, but rarely with its precise meaning. In this way the concepts can be used in a vague way but an argument can still be structured so that the central idea is understood and is shared with to the partners. At the same time no precise definition is given to the concepts used and (...)
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  80.  1
    José-Luis Usó-Doménech, Josué Antonio Nescolarde Selva & Mónica Belmonte Requena (forthcoming). Mathematical, Philosophical and Semantic Considerations on Infinity : General Concepts. Foundations of Science:1-16.
    In the Reality we know, we cannot say if something is infinite whether we are doing Physics, Biology, Sociology or Economics. This means we have to be careful using this concept. Infinite structures do not exist in the physical world as far as we know. So what do mathematicians mean when they assert the existence of ω? There is no universally accepted philosophy of mathematics but the most common belief is that mathematics touches on another worldly absolute truth. Many mathematicians (...)
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  81.  4
    Marc Van den Bossche (forthcoming). Releasement and Nihilism in the Art of Living with Technology. Foundations of Science:1-7.
    In this contribution the author tries to formulate an approach to the art of living with technology based on Heidegger’s The Principle of Reason, a work often overlooked by contemporary commentators in the philosophy of technology. This approach couples the concept of releasement to insights hailing from Wolfgang Schirmacher concerning Heidegger’s nihilism.
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  82.  4
    Marc Van den Bossche (forthcoming). On Heidegger’s Actuality. Foundations of Science:1-3.
    In my reply to the commentaries by Babette Babich and Robert C. Scharff I make a distinction between critical remarks and additions that are relevant for my view on philosophy for substantive reasons and others that relate to a style or way of philosophizing. My reply to Scharff concerns the latter. I continue to defend an updated version of Heidegger’s thinking about technology, which I bring together with elements from the work of Don Ihde and Andrew Feenberg. I read all (...)
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  83.  3
    Yoni Van Den Eede (forthcoming). Beyond the Concrete: Toward an Art of Living with Abstract Conditions. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    Responding to the commentaries by Corey Anton and Ian Angus, I outline anew, and so seek to further clarify, the starting points of and motivations behind my reflection about the concrete-abstract distinction and the ways in which this plays out in technology use, seen from an epistemological standpoint. My eventual purpose is to begin to develop, on the basis of the conceptual exercise, guidelines for an emancipatory ‘art of living with technology,’ that circles around the attempt to think beyond the (...)
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  84.  2
    Yoni Van Den Eede (forthcoming). Concrete/Abstract: Sketches for a Self-Reflexive Epistemology of Technology Use. Foundations of Science:1-10.
    This essay takes an epistemological perspective on the question of the ‘art of living with technology.’ Such an approach is needed as our everyday notion and understanding of technology keep being framed in the old categories of instrumentalism and essentialism—notwithstanding philosophy of technology’s substantial attempts, in recent times, to bridge the stark dichotomy between those two viewpoints. Here, the persistent dichotomous thinking still characterizing our everyday involvement with technology is traced back to the epistemological distinction between ‘concrete’ and ‘abstract.’ Those (...)
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  85.  3
    Yoni Van Den Eede, Gert Goeminne & Marc Van den Bossche (forthcoming). The Art of Living with Technology: Turning Over Philosophy of Technology’s Empirical Turn. Foundations of Science:1-12.
    In this article we seek to lay bare a couple of potential conceptual and methodological issues that, we believe, are implicitly present in contemporary philosophy of technology. At stake are the sustained pertinence of and need for coping strategies as to ‘how to live with technology ’ notwithstanding PhilTech’s advancement in its non-essentialist analysis of ‘technology’ as such; the issue of whether ‘living with technology’ is a technological affair or not ; and the tightly related question concerning the status of (...)
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  86.  2
    Peter-Paul Verbeek (forthcoming). The Struggle for Technology: Towards a Realistic Political Theory of Technology. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    Pieter Lemmens’ neo-Marxist approach to technology urges us to rethink how to do political philosophy of technology. First, Lemmens’ high level of abstraction raises the question of how empirically informed a political theory of technology needs to be. Second, his dialectical focus on a “struggle” between humans and technologies reveals the limits of neo-Marxism. Political philosophy of technology needs to return “to the things themselves”. The political significance of technologies cannot be reduced to its origins in systems of production or (...)
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  87.  3
    Umberto Viaro (forthcoming). Feedback Models of Two Classical Philosophical Positions and a Semantic Problem. Foundations of Science:1-10.
    The notion of feedback has been exploited with considerable success in scientific and technological fields as well as in the sciences of man and society. Its use in philosophical, cultural and educational contexts, however, is still rather meagre, even if some notable attempts can be found in the literature. This paper shows that the feedback concept can help learn and understand some classical philosophical theories. In particular, attention focuses on Fichte’s doctrine of science, usually presented in obscure terms following its (...)
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  88.  3
    Joris Vlieghe (forthcoming). ICT Literacy: A Technical or Non-Technical Issue? Foundations of Science:1-4.
    In this short reply to Riis’ paper I first deal with his perceptive defence of ICT literacy, to which I fully subscribe, showing how his ideas might gain from highlighting the ‘technical’ dimensions involved in literacy practices. Second, this will allow me to make some comments regarding the curricular and organizational aspects of contemporary education, which forms the largest part of his paper. My main line of criticism towards Riis’ paper is that I defend a ‘technical’ rather than a ‘non-technical’ (...)
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  89. Greg Volk (forthcoming). 39 Questionable Assumptions in Modern Physics. Foundations of Science.
     
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  90.  4
    Johan von Essen (forthcoming). On the Meaning of Volunteering: A Study of Worldviews in Everyday Life. Foundations of Science:1-19.
    This article is intended to contribute to the discussion on the meaning of volunteering by investigating voluntary work from the viewpoint of volunteers active in Swedish civil society organizations.Meaning refers both to the cognitive meaning of concepts and to the perceived meaning in life. The aim to uncover the predicates that people attribute to the concept is an attempt to anatomize volunteering as a social construct. Five predicates emerged and they make up the phenomenological structure of volunteering. By contextualizing this (...)
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  91.  1
    Steven E. Wallis (forthcoming). The Science of Conceptual Systems: A Progress Report. Foundations of Science:1-24.
    In this paper I provide a brief history of the emerging science of conceptual systems, explain some methodologies, their sources of data, and the understandings that they have generated. I also provide suggestions for extending the science-based research in a variety of directions. Essentially, I am opening a conversation that asks how this line of research might be extended to gain new insights—and eventually develop more useful and generally accepted methods for creating and evaluating theory. This effort will support our (...)
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  92.  1
    Steven E. Wallis & Vladislav Valentinov (forthcoming). What is Sustainable Theory? A Luhmannian Perspective on the Science of Conceptual Systems. Foundations of Science:1-15.
    Sustainability is an important topic for understanding and developing our society. For scholars who want their academic contributions to have an impact, sustainability is important for our conceptual systems. Because our conceptual systems share similarities with our social systems, we may investigate their characteristics to gain insight into how both may be achieved or at least understood. Theories of the humanities as well as the social/behavioral sciences are changing very rapidly. They are fragile and few seem to have any longevity. (...)
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  93.  25
    Susan Wolf (forthcoming). Meaningfulness: A Third Dimension of the Good Life. Foundations of Science:1-17.
    This paper argues that an adequate conception of a good life should recognize, in addition to happiness and morality, a third dimension of meaningfulness. It further proposes that we understand meaningfulness as involving both a subjective and an objective condition, suitably linked. Meaning arises when subjective attraction meets objective attractiveness. In other words one’s life is meaningful insofar as one is gripped or excited by things worthy of one’s love, and one is able to do something positive about it. The (...)
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  94.  10
    Noson S. Yanofsky & Mark Zelcer (forthcoming). The Role of Symmetry in Mathematics. Foundations of Science:1-21.
    Over the past few decades the notion of symmetry has played a major role in physics and in the philosophy of physics. Philosophers have used symmetry to discuss the ontology and seeming objectivity of the laws of physics. We introduce several notions of symmetry in mathematics and explain how they can also be used in resolving different problems in the philosophy of mathematics. We use symmetry to discuss the objectivity of mathematics, the role of mathematical objects, the unreasonable effectiveness of (...)
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  95.  2
    Hub Zwart (forthcoming). The Art of Living with NZT and ICT: Dialectics of an Artistic Case Study. Foundations of Science:1-4.
    I wholeheartedly sympathize conceptually with Coeckelbergh’s paper. The dialectical relationship between vulnerability and technology constitutes the core of Hegel’s Master and Slave. Yet, the empirical dimension is underdeveloped and Coeckelbergh’s ideas could profit from exposure to case studies. Building on a movie/novel devoted to vulnerability coping and living with ICT, I challenge the claim that modern heroism entails overcoming vulnerability with the help of enhancement and computers.
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  96.  3
    Martin Zwick (forthcoming). Freedom as a Natural Phenomenon. Foundations of Science:1-10.
    “Freedom” is a phenomenon in the natural world. This phenomenon—and indirectly the question of free will—is explored using a variety of systems-theoretic ideas. It is argued that freedom can emerge only in systems that are partially determined and partially random, and that freedom is a matter of degree. The paper considers types of freedom and their conditions of possibility in simple living systems and in complex living systems that have modeling subsystems. In simple living systems, types of freedom include independence (...)
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