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  1. Steven Grosby (2012). Tradition in the Work of Shils and Polanyi: A Few Comments. Tradition and Discovery 39 (3):38-42.
    In the aftermath of, and improvement upon, Toward a General Theory of Action, there is to be found a philosophical problem lurking in Polanyi’s and Shils’ writings on tradition: in what ways the principle of methodological individualism should be qualified so as better to understand human action.
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  2. Richard W. Moodey (2012). Tradition: Why Shils and Polanyi Abandoned the Action Frame of Reference. Tradition and Discovery 39 (3):5-28.
    Michael Polanyi began thinking and writing about tradition long before he met Edward Shils in 1946. Polanyi’s religious experience in 1913 became part of the background for his thinking about tradition, and tradition entered into his thinking about spontaneous order and moral inversion. Polanyi and Shils both knew Karl Mannheim before they met one another, and had similar criticisms of Mannheim’s sociology. Soon after they met, both Polanyi and Shils were briefly enthusiastic about the Action Frame of Reference, which Shils (...)
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  3. David W. Agler (2012). What Engineers Can Do but Physicists Can’T: Polanyi and Margitay on Machines. Tradition and Discovery 39 (2):22-26.
    This is a comment on Tihamér Margitay’s “From Epistemology to Ontology,” where he criticizes Polanyi’s claim that there is a systematic correspondence between the levels of ontology and the levels of tacit knowing. Margitay contends that Polanyi supports this correspondence by appealing to a “purely ontological argument,” one which concludes that it is impossible to reduce machines to a singular, chemical-physical type, and criticizes this claim by pointing to industrial standards . I respond to Margitay’s claim by distinguishing two different (...)
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  4. Walter B. Gulick (2012). Multiple Paths to Ontology: Recasting Margitay’s Critique of Polanyi. Tradition and Discovery 39 (2):10-15.
    In a recent article “From Epistemology to Ontology,” Tihamer Margitay argues that Polanyi fails to establish the necessary correlation he claims between the two levels involved in tacit knowing and corresponding ontological levels. I argue that Margitay correctly shows that such a correspondence does not hold in all cases, but I also point out problems in Margitay’s interpretation of Polanyi and suggest additional bases for ontological claims that go beyond Margitay’s analysis.
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  5. Robert E. Innis (2012). The Reach of the Aesthetic and Religious Naturalism. Tradition and Discovery 38 (3):31-50.
    In this article I reflect upon the problem of the aesthetic intelligibility of the world in connection with an aesthetic approach to religious naturalism. Taking the work of R.W. Hepburn as conversation partner, I bring it into relation to the work of Charles Peirce and Michael Polanyi. Admitting the ambiguous nature of their own religious commitments, I try to sketch, with no claim to completeness, how they help to illuminate just what would be entailed in beginning the process of translating (...)
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  6. Struan Jacobs & Phil Mullins (2012). Michael Polanyi and Karl Popper: The Fraying of a Long-Standing Acquaintance. Tradition and Discovery 38 (2):61-93.
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  7. Struan Jacobs (2012). Tradition in a Free Society: The Fideism of Michael Polanyi and the Rationalism of Karl Popper. Tradition and Discovery 36 (2):8-25.
    Michael Polanyi and Karl Popper offer contrasting accounts of social tradition. Popper is steeped in the heritage of the Enlightenment, while Polanyi interweaves religious and diverse secular strands of thought. Explaining the liberal tradition, Polanyi features tacit knowledge of rules, standards, applications and interpretations being transmitted by “craftsmen” to “apprentices.” Each generation adopts the liberal tradition on “faith,” commits to creatively developing its art of knowledge-in-practice, and is drawn to the spiritual reality of ideal ends. Of particular interest to Popper (...)
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