15 found

Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  8
    Dieneke Hubbeling (forthcoming). Medical Error and Moral Luck. HEC Forum:1-15.
    This paper addresses the concept of moral luck. Moral luck is discussed in the context of medical error, especially an error of omission that occurs frequently, but only rarely has adverse consequences. As an example, a failure to compare the label on a syringe with the drug chart results in the wrong medication being administered and the patient dies. However, this error may have previously occurred many times with no tragic consequences. Discussions on moral luck can highlight conflicting intuitions. Should (...)
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  2.  1
    Virginia L. Bartlett, Mark J. Bliton & Stuart G. Finder (forthcoming). Just a Collection of Recollections: Clinical Ethics Consultation and the Interplay of Evaluating Voices. HEC Forum:1-18.
    Despite increased attention to the question of how best to evaluate clinical ethics consultations and emphasis on external evaluation, there has been little sustained focus on how we, as clinicians, make sense of and learn from our own experiences in the midst of any one consultation. Questions of how we evaluate the request for, unfolding of, and conclusion of any specific ethics consultation are often overlooked, along with the underlying question of whether it is possible to give an accurate account (...)
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  3. Danielle M. Wenner (forthcoming). Barriers to Effective Deliberation in Clinical Research Oversight. HEC Forum:1-15.
    Ethical oversight of clinical research is one of the primary means of ensuring that human subjects are protected from the natural bias of researchers and research institutions in favor of experimentation. At a minimum, effective oversight should ensure that risks are minimized and reasonable in relation to anticipated benefits, protect vulnerable subjects from potential coercion or undue influence, ensure full and informed consent, and promote the equitable distribution of the risks and benefits of research. Because these assessments often involve value (...)
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  4.  1
    Marianne K. Bahus & Reidun Førde (forthcoming). Discussing End-of-Life Decisions in a Clinical Ethics Committee: An Interview Study of Norwegian Doctors’ Experience. HEC Forum:1-12.
    With disagreement, doubts, or ambiguous grounds in end–of-life decisions, doctors are advised to involve a clinical ethics committee. However, little has been published on doctors’ experiences with discussing an end-of-life decision in a CEC. As part of the quality assurance of this work, we wanted to find out if clinicians have benefited from discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs and why. We will disseminate some Norwegian doctors’ experiences when discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs, based on semi-structured interviews with fifteen Norwegian physicians (...)
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  5.  1
    Courtenay R. Bruce, Trevor M. Bibler, Adam M. Pena & Betsy Kusin (forthcoming). A Qualitative Exploration of a Clinical Ethicist’s Role and Contributions During Family Meetings. HEC Forum:1-17.
    Despite the interpersonal nature of family meetings and the frequency in which they occur, the clinical ethics literature is devoid of any rich descriptions of what clinical ethicists should actually be doing during family meetings. Here, we propose a framework for describing and understanding “transitioning” facilitation skills based on a retrospective review of our internal documentation of 100 consecutive cases wherein a clinical ethicist facilitated at least one family meeting. The internal documents were analyzed using qualitative methodologies, i.e., “codes”, to (...)
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  6.  8
    Gerald D. Coleman Ss (forthcoming). Direct and Indirect Abortion in the Roman Catholic Tradition: A Review of the Phoenix Case. [REVIEW] HEC Forum.
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  7.  1
    Catarina Fischer Grönlund, Vera Dahlqvist, Karin Zingmark, Mikael Sandlund & Anna Söderberg (forthcoming). Managing Ethical Difficulties in Healthcare: Communicating in Inter-Professional Clinical Ethics Support Sessions. HEC Forum:1-18.
    Several studies show that healthcare professionals need to communicate inter-professionally in order to manage ethical difficulties. A model of clinical ethics support inspired by Habermas’ theory of discourse ethics has been developed by our research group. In this version of CES sessions healthcare professionals meet inter-professionally to communicate and reflect on ethical difficulties in a cooperative manner with the aim of reaching communicative agreement or reflective consensus. In order to understand the course of action during CES, the aim of this (...)
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  8. Chris Kaposy, Fern Brunger, Victor Maddalena & Richard Singleton (forthcoming). Models of Ethics Consultation Used by Canadian Ethics Consultants: A Qualitative Study. HEC Forum:1-10.
    This article describes a qualitative study of models of ethics consultation used by ethics consultants in Canada. We found four different models used by Canadian ethics consultants whom we interviewed, and one sub-variant. We describe the lone ethics consultant model, the hub-and-spokes sub-variant of this model; the ethics committee model; the capacity-building model; and the facilitated model. Previous empirical studies of ethics consultation describe only two or three of these models.
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  9.  5
    Morten Magelssen, Reidar Pedersen & Reidun Førde (forthcoming). Novel Paths to Relevance: How Clinical Ethics Committees Promote Ethical Reflection. HEC Forum:1-12.
    How may clinical ethics committees inspire ethical reflection among healthcare professionals? How may they deal with organizational ethics issues? In recent years, Norwegian CECs have attempted different activites that stretch or go beyond the standard trio of education, consultation, and policy work. We studied the novel activities of Norwegian CECs by examining annual reports and interviewing CEC members. Through qualitative analysis we identified nine categories of novel CEC activities, which we describe by way of examples. In light of the findings, (...)
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  10.  2
    Ryan R. Nash & Courtney E. Thiele (forthcoming). Informing Consent for Organ Donation. HEC Forum:1-5.
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  11. Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde (forthcoming). Campaigning for Organ Donation at Mosques. HEC Forum:1-12.
    There is a trend of recruiting faith leaders at mosques to overcome religious barriers to organ donation, and to increase donor registration among Muslims. Commentators have suggested that Muslims are not given enough information about organ donation in religious sermons or lectures delivered at mosques. Corrective actions have been recommended, such as funding campaigns to promote organ donation, and increasing the availability of organ donation information at mosques. These actions are recommended despite published literature expressing safety concerns in living and (...)
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  12.  16
    M. Berry Roberta, Sylvia Caley Lisa Bliss, A. Lombardo Paul, Jonathan Todres Jerri Nims Rooker & E. Wolf Leslie (forthcoming). Recent Developments in Health Care Law: Partners in Innovation. HEC Forum.
    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on the engagement of law as a partner in health care innovation. The article addresses: the history and contents of recent United States federal law restricting the use of genetic information by insurers and employers; the recent federal policy recommending routine HIV testing; the recent revision of federal policy regarding the funding of human embryonic stem cell research; the history, current status, and need for future attention to advance directives; the (...)
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  13. Laura Vearrier (forthcoming). Failure of the Current Advance Care Planning Paradigm: Advocating for a Communications-Based Approach. HEC Forum:1-16.
    The purpose of advance care planning is to allow an individual to maintain autonomy in end-of-life medical decision-making even when incapacitated by disease or terminal illness. The intersection of EOL medical technology, ethics of EOL care, and state and federal law has driven the development of the legal framework for advance directives. However, from an ethical perspective the current legal framework is inadequate to make ADs an effective EOL planning tool. One response to this flawed AD process has been the (...)
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  14.  5
    Katherine Wasson, Emily Anderson, Erika Hagstrom, Michael McCarthy, Kayhan Parsi & Mark Kuczewski (forthcoming). What Ethical Issues Really Arise in Practice at an Academic Medical Center? A Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Clinical Ethics Consultations From 2008 to 2013. HEC Forum:1-12.
    As the field of clinical ethics consultation sets standards and moves forward with the Quality Attestation process, questions should be raised about what ethical issues really do arise in practice. There is limited data on the type and number of ethics consultations conducted across different settings. At Loyola University Medical Center, we conducted a retrospective review of our ethics consultations from 2008 through 2013. One hundred fifty-six cases met the eligibility criteria. We analyzed demographic data on these patients and conducted (...)
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  15.  14
    H. Colby William, John Lantos Constance Dahlin & Myra Christopher John Carney (forthcoming). The National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care Clinical Practice Guidelines Domain 8: Ethical and Legal Aspects of Care. HEC Forum.
    In 2001, leaders with palliative care convened to discuss the standardization of palliative care and formed the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. In 2004, the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care produced the first edition of Clinical Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care. The Guidelines were developed by leaders in the field who examined other national and international standards with the intent to promote consistent, accessible, comprehensive, optimal palliative care through the health care spectrum. Within the guidelines there (...)
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