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Forthcoming articles
  1. Christopher Gregory Weaver (forthcoming). Evilism, Moral Rationalism, and Reasons Internalism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-22.
    I show that the existence of an omniscient, omnipotent, and essentially omnimalevolent being is impossible given only two metaethical assumptions (viz., moral rationalism and reasons internalism). I then argue (pace Stephen Law) that such an impossibility undercuts Law's (2010) evil god challenge.
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  2. Ciro De Florio & Aldo Frigerio (forthcoming). In Defense of the Timeless Solution to the Problem of Human Free Will and Divine Foreknowledge. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-24.
    In this paper, we will defend a particular version of the timeless solution to the problem of divine foreknowledge and human freedom. Our strategy is grounded on a particular temporal framework, which models the flow of time and a libertarian understanding of freedom. The propositions describing a certain act by an agent have an indeterminate truth value until the agent makes her choice; therefore, they become true or false when a decision is made. In order to account for this change (...)
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  3. Dennis Vanden Auweele (forthcoming). Schopenhauer on Religious Pessimism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-19.
    Schopenhauer’s bifurcation between optimistic and pessimistic religions is made, so I argue here, by means of five criteria: to perceive of existence as punishment, to believe that salvation is not attained through ‘works’, to preach compassion so as to lead towards ascetics, to manifest an aura of mystery around religious doctrines and to, at some deep level, admit to the allegorical nature of religious creeds. By clearly showing what makes up the ‘pessimism’ of a ‘pessimistic religion’, Schopenhauer’s own philosophical pessimism (...)
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  4. Sylvie Avakian (forthcoming). 'Undecidability' or 'Anticipatory Resoluteness' Caputo in Conversation with Heidegger. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-17.
    In this article I will consider John D. Caputo’s ‘radical hermeneutics’, with ‘undecidability’ as its major theme, in conversation with Martin Heidegger’s notion of ‘anticipatory resoluteness’. Through an examination of the positions of Caputo and Heidegger I argue that Heidegger’s notion of ‘anticipatory resoluteness’ reaches far beyond the claims of ‘radical hermeneutics’, and that it assumes a reconstructive process which carries within its scope the overtones of deconstruction, the experience of repetition and authenticity and also the implications of Gelassenheit. Further, (...)
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  5. Toby Betenson (forthcoming). Ivan Karamazov is a Hopeless Romantic. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-9.
    Ivan Karamazov is frequently used, and misused, in discussions concerning the problem of evil. The purpose of this article is to correct some pervasive misinterpretations of Ivan’s statement, as found in Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov. I criticise some common misinterpretations, as exemplified in the theodical work of Marilyn Adams and John Hick, as well as the more nuanced interpretation of Stewart Sutherland. Though Sutherland’s interpretation is the strongest, it nevertheless misses the mark in identifying Ivan as a positivist. I argue (...)
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  6. Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug (forthcoming). Escaping Hell but Not Heaven. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-7.
    Benjamin Matheson (Int J Philos Relig 75:197–206, 2014) has recently critiqued the escapist account of hell that we have defended. In this paper we respond to Matheson. Building on some of our work in defense of escapism that Matheson does not discuss (in particular, Buckareff and Plug, The problem of hell: a philosophical anthology, Ashgate, Burlington, 2010) we show that the threat posed by Matheson’s critique is chimerical. We begin by summarizing our escapist theory of hell. Next, we summarize both (...)
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  7. Mikel Burley (forthcoming). Thomas D. Carroll: Wittgenstein Within the Philosophy of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-4.
    “Wittgenstein belongs to history,” writes Thomas Carroll at the beginning of his book (p. 1). But contrary to what many analytic philosophers think these days, Carroll’s point is not that Wittgenstein belongs only to history; rather, Carroll wants to highlight the relevance of Wittgenstein’s thought for contemporary philosophy of religion, and to do so, in part, by situating Wittgenstein within his historical context. More specifically, the book’s main aims are three: firstly, to question received interpretations of Wittgenstein and to thereby (...)
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  8. Elizabeth D. Burns (forthcoming). Pamela Sue Anderson: Re-Visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion: Reason, Love and Epistemic Locatedness. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-3.
    This book is both a revision and a re-visioning. Nine of the ten chapters are based on chapters or articles published elsewhere. Each is concerned with “re-visioning,” defined as looking back with fresh eyes at old ideas and texts (p. ix) and suggesting new areas of exploration. This re-visioning is directed at ideas about gender as these have been communicated either directly or indirectly in the topics and texts of analytic philosophy of religion. It is, however, conducted in the continental (...)
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  9. Stephen Bush (forthcoming). Kevin Schilbrack: Philosophy and the Study of Religions: A Manifesto. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-5.
    This book review essay summarizes the key arguments of Kevin Schilbrack’s Philosophy and the Study of Religions: A Manifesto and offers two critical responses.
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  10. Yishai Cohen (forthcoming). Molinists (Still) Cannot Endorse the Consequence Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-16.
    Perszyk (Faith Philos 20:131–151, 2003) has argued that Molinists cannot consistently endorse the consequence argument because of a structurally similar argument for the incompatibility of true Molinist counterfactuals of freedom (CCFs) and the ability to do otherwise. Wierenga (in: Molinism: the contemporary debate, 2011) has argued that on the proper understanding of CCFs, there is a relevant difference between the consequence argument and the anti-Molinist argument. I argue that, even on Wierenga’s understanding of CCFs, there is in fact no relevant (...)
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  11. Scott Coley (forthcoming). Skeptical Theism is Incompatible with Theodicy. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-11.
    Inductive arguments from evil claim that evil presents evidence against the existence of God. Skeptical theists hold that some such arguments from evil evince undue confidence in our familiarity with the sphere of possible goods and the entailments that obtain between that sphere and God’s permission of evil(s). I argue that the skeptical theist’s skepticism on this point is inconsistent with affirming the truth of a given theodicy. Since the skeptical theist’s skepticism is best understood dialogically, I’ll begin by sketching (...)
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  12. J. Angelo Corlett & Josh Cangelosi (forthcoming). Atheism and Epistemic Justification. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-16.
    In a recent article in this journal, Andrew Johnson seeks to defend the “New Atheism” against several objections. We provide a philosophical assessment of his defense of contemporary atheistic arguments that are said to amount to bifurcation fallacies. This point of discussion leads to our critical discussion of the presumption of atheism and the epistemic justification of atheism.
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  13. John Cottingham (forthcoming). Robert MacSwain: Solved by Sacrifice: Austin Farrer, Fideism, and the Evidence of Faith. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-3.
    The book opens with an informative picture of the theological-cum-philosophical climate of Oxford in the period immediately after the Second World War. The Anglican theologian Austin Farrer was a leading figure in an informal discussion group known as “The Metaphysicals,” formed out of dissatisfaction with the then prevailing positivist orthodoxy, which outlawed the grand ‘ultimate’ questions of philosophy as nonsensical. In many ways, MacSwain explains, Farrer was a kind of model for younger members of the group such as Basil Mitchell, (...)
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  14. James DiCenso (forthcoming). Grace and Favor in Kant's Ethical Explication of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-23.
    This paper discusses Kant’s assessment of the religious idea of grace in relation to autonomous ethical practice. Following Kant’s own explanation of his methods and goals in interpreting religious ideas, my focus is on the ethical import of inherited religious concepts for human beings, rather than on literal theological dogmas concerning supernatural matters. I focus on how Kant’s inquiry into the ethical significance of the idea of grace is intertwined with another less recognized concept, that of favor (Gunst). The latter (...)
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  15. Travis Dumsday (forthcoming). Why Pan-Dispositionalism is Incompatible with Metaphysical Naturalism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-16.
    Pan-dispositionalism is one of the major theories in current analytic metaphysics concerning dispositional properties (i.e., causal powers / capacities / abilities) and how they relate to categorical properties (i.e., non-dispositional properties, paradigm cases of which include shape, size, structure etc.). According to pan-dispositionalists, all fundamental properties are dispositional in nature, such that any supposed categorical properties are either unreal or reducible in some way to the dispositional. I argue that if pan-dispositionalism is true then metaphysical naturalism (roughly the view that (...)
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  16. Benedikt Paul Göcke (forthcoming). Did God Do It? Metaphysical Models and Theological Hermeneutics. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-17.
    I start by way of clarifying briefly the problem of special divine intervention. Once this is done, I argue that laws of nature are generalizations that derive from the dispositional behaviour of natural kinds. Based on this conception of laws of nature I provide a metaphysical model according to which God can realize acts of special divine providence by way of temporarily changing the dispositions of natural entities. I show that this model does not contradict scientific practice and is consistent (...)
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  17. A. Harvevany (forthcoming). The Ethics of Belief and Two Conceptions of Christian Faith. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    This article deals with two types of Christian faith in the light of the challenges posed by the ethics of belief. It is proposed that the difficulties with Clifford’s formulation of that ethic can best be handled if the ethic is interpreted in terms of role-specific intellectual integrity. But the ethic still poses issues for the traditional interpretation of Christian faith when it is conceived as a series of discrete but related propositions, especially historical propositions. For as so conceived, the (...)
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  18. John Henry (forthcoming). David Leech: The Hammer of the Cartesians: Henry More's Philosophy of Spirit and the Origins of Modern Atheism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-5.
    Henry More (1614–1687), the most influential of the so-called Cambridge Platonists, and arguably the leading philosophically-inclined theologian in late seventeenth-century England, has come in for renewed attention lately. He was the subject of a detailed intellectual biography in 2003 by Robert Crocker, and in 2012 Jasper Reid published a philosophically penetrating and enlightening study of More’s metaphysics (Crocker 2003; Reid 2012). David Leech’s study of More’s idiosyncratic concept of immaterial spirit—and the role that it plays in his philosophy and theology—is (...)
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  19. William M. Hutchins (forthcoming). Shams C. Inati: Ibn Sina's Remarks and Admonitions: Physics and Metaphysics: An Analysis and Annotated Translation. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-3.
    Ibn Sina (aka Avicenna, 980–1037 CE) is arguably the most important and influential philosopher in the Islamic tradition. Al-Isharat wal-Tanbihat, two sections of which (out of four) are included in this translation, is one of Ibn Sina’s key, definitive texts. It is an almost legendary work that perplexes the reader while instructing him. Inati’s translation, which is framed by her analysis and notes, demystifies this key text in the history of Islamic thought.She has also translated the other two sections of (...)
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  20. Nayna Jivan, Eugene Thomas Long & Pataki Antal (forthcoming). Cumulative Index Volumes 1-38 (1970-1995). International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
     
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  21. Michael S. Jones (forthcoming). Does Cognitive Humility Lead to Religious Tolerance? Reflections on Craig Versus Quinn. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-17.
    We’ve all heard the familiar saying, “ignorance is bliss.” It may also be true that “ignorance is intolerant.” But it seems to be at least sometimes true that intolerance is produced by something else: overconfidence in the truthfulness of one’s own opinions. Awareness of and avoidance of such overconfidence may be a path towards tolerating those with whom one disagrees. And this could be true in religion as well as in other areas of belief. In his 2005 article “On Religious (...)
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  22. Benjamin W. McCraw (forthcoming). Faith and Trust. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-18.
    This paper begins with the oft-repeated claim that having (religious) faith involves trust in God. Taking this platitude seriously requires at least two philosophical tasks. First, one must address the relevant notion of “trust” guiding the platitude. I offer a sketch of epistemic trust: arguing that epistemic trust involves several components: acceptance, communication, dependence, and confidence. The first duo concerns the epistemic element of epistemic trust and the second part delimit the fiducial aspect to epistemic trust. Second, one must also (...)
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  23. Thomas Park (forthcoming). Faith in God Without Any Revelation? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-14.
    In this paper I introduce John D. Caputo’s view of the divine and argue against his claim that we can preserve faith in (an Abrahamic) God while dropping the idea of divine revelation. Despite Caputo’s apophatic point of view, he makes two claims with regard to God, or ’the divine’. First, he claims that we all have a divine call for justice and compassion in us. Secondly, he claims that God’s kingdom comes true if we make it happen and that (...)
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  24. Randy Ramal (forthcoming). Religious Concepts and Absolute Conceptions of the World. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-15.
    In this essay I discuss several questions related to the manner in which concepts generally, and religious concepts in particular, are formed. Are some concepts necessary in the sense that, considering the physical makeup of the natural world and our own bio-chemical, perceptual, and cognitive nature, these concepts had to emerge by necessity? If we put considerations of divine revelations aside, I ask regarding religious concepts, what would be the proper way of looking at how they came to be formed? (...)
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  25. David Robertson RemB Edwards, René F. Brabander Terence Penelhudem & Henry Berne (forthcoming). Books in Review. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
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  26. Ryan Rhodes (forthcoming). Taking the Narrow Way: Lovering, Evil, and Knowing What God Would Do. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-11.
    Theists are, according to Lovering, in an “unenviable position.” Lovering (2009, 104). Noting that debates on evil and God’s existence depend conceptually upon claims about what God would or would not do, he lays out three frameworks within which such claims could operate, all of which raise significant problems for theism. While his contention that these arguments depend on such claims is correct, the dire consequences for theism do not follow. After briefly discussing his three alternatives, I will argue that (...)
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  27. Anne Leona Cesarine Runehov (forthcoming). Why Evil Won't Go Away: A Philosophical Analysis of the Relationship Between Religions, Ideologies and Evil. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
     
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  28. Nathan D. Shannon (forthcoming). The Epistemology of Divine Conceptualism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-8.
    Divine conceptualism takes all abstract objects to be propositions in the mind of God. I focus here on necessary propositions and contemporary claims that the laws of logic, understood as necessarily true propositions, provide us with an epistemic bridge to theological predication—specifically, to the claim that God exists. I argue that when contemporary versions of DC say ‘G/god’ they merely rename the notion of necessary truth, and fail to refer to God. Given that God is incomprehensible, epistemic access to the (...)
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  29. Shanta Ratnayaka Stephen Skousgaard, J. Buckley John, Richard Hogan Robert Greenwood & S. McGinnis Robert (forthcoming). Books in Review. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
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  30. Mats Wahlberg (forthcoming). Was Evolution the Only Possible Way for God to Make Autonomous Creatures? Examination of an Argument in Evolutionary Theodicy. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-15.
    Evolutionary theodicies are attempts to explain how the enormous amounts of suffering, premature death and extinction inherent in the evolutionary process can be reconciled with belief in a loving and almighty God. A common strategy in this area is to argue that certain very valuable creaturely attributes could only be exemplified by creatures that are produced by a partly random and uncontrolled process of evolution. Evolution, in other words, was the only possible way for God to create these kinds of (...)
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  31. Margaret Weck (forthcoming). Cumulative Index 2001-2005 (Volumes 49-58). International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
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  32. Marget Weck (forthcoming). Cumulative Index 1996-2000 (Volumes 39-48). International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
     
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