Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  16
    Bashar Alhoch (forthcoming). Stephen Davis’s Objection to the Second Ontological Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-7.
    Stephen Davis has argued that the second ontological argument fails as a theistic proof because it ignores the logical possibility of what he calls an ontologically impossible being. By an “ontologically impossible being” he means a being that does not exist, logically-possibly exists, and would exist necessarily if it existed. In this brief essay, I argue, first, that even if an OIB is logically possible, its logical possibility is irrelevant to the OA at issue; and second, that an OIB (...)
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  2.  21
    Yishai Cohen (forthcoming). Counterfactuals of Divine Freedom. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-21.
    Contrary to the commonly held position of Luis de Molina, Thomas Flint and others, I argue that counterfactuals of divine freedom are pre-volitional for God within the Molinist framework. That is, CDFs are not true even partly in virtue of some act of God’s will. As a result, I argue that the Molinist God fails to satisfy an epistemic openness requirement for rational deliberation, and thus she cannot rationally deliberate about which world to actualize.
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  3.  14
    Leigh C. Vicens (forthcoming). On the Natural Law Defense and the Disvalue of Ubiquitous Miracles. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-10.
    In this paper I explore Peter van Inwagen’s conception of miracles and the implications of this conception for the viability of his version of the natural law defense. I argue that given his account of miraculous divine action and its parallel to free human action, it is implausible to think that God did not prevent natural evil in our world for the reasons van Inwagen proposes. I conclude by suggesting that on the grounds he provides for “epistemic humility” about modal (...)
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  4.  84
    Christopher Gregory Weaver (forthcoming). Yet Another New Cosmological Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-21.
    I argue that the existence of a necessary concrete being can be derived from an exceedingly weak causal principle coupled with two contingent truths one of which falls out of very popular positions in contemporary analytic metaphysics. I then show that the argument resists a great many objections commonly lodged against natural theological arguments of the cosmological variety.
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  5.  5
    Dennis Vanden Auweele (forthcoming). Existential Struggles in Dostoevsky’s the Brothers Karamazov. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-18.
    sThe salience of Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novels for philosophical reflection is undeniable. By providing a myriad of often dialectically mediating perspectives on certain subjects, he can serve as a rich fount for philosophical polemic. Many readers have been prone to confine the philosophical import of Dostoevsky’s prose to such a polyphony of dialectically interacting perspectives. In this article, this topic is taken up with a focus on the differing points of view on human salvation espoused by the protagonists of The Brothers (...)
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  6.  6
    Christopher Bobier (forthcoming). Leibniz on Unbaptized Infant Damnation. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-10.
    Leibniz consistently denies that unbaptized infants are condemned to hell in virtue of original sin. He is less than forthcoming, however, about where they go when they die. Scholars are divided on this issue. Some think that, according to Leibniz, they go to limbo, while others think that he is committed to the view that they go to heaven. The aim of this paper is to show that this scholarly attention is misguided and that Leibniz does not defend a position (...)
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  7.  16
    Aaran Burns (forthcoming). A Phenomenal Conservative Perspective on Religious Experience. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-15.
    Can religious experience justify belief in God? We best approach this question by splitting it in two: Do religious experiences give their subjects any justification for believing that there is a God of the kind they experience? And Does testimony about such experiences provides any justification for believing that there is a God for those who are not the subject of the experience? The most popular affirmative answers trace back to the work of Richard Swinburne, who appeals to the Principle (...)
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  8.  9
    Ashok Collins (forthcoming). Being Exposed to Love: The Death of God in Jean-Luc Marion and Jean-Luc Nancy. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-23.
    In this article I explore how a philosophical conception of love may be used to draw debate on the death of God beyond the binary opposition between theology and philosophy through a comparative study of the work of Jean-Luc Marion and Jean-Luc Nancy. Although Marion’s reading of love—in both its theological and phenomenological guises—proposes an innovative phrasing of a non-metaphysical notion of divinity, I argue that it is ultimately unable to maintain its coherence in nominal discourse due to Marion’s insistence (...)
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  9.  5
    Ingolf U. Dalferth (forthcoming). On Distinctions. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-13.
    The paper discusses the importance of making distinctions for philosophy of religion. It argues that metaphysics is the philosophical attempt to draw out a system of distinctions that help us to make sense of our life in the world. Metaphysics is not a theoretical or speculative but a practical enter prise. Its task is not to offer ultimate explanations and “explain the world” in terms of its fundamental structure, but provide comprehensive orientation by unfolding a practice of orientation such as (...)
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  10.  4
    Russell W. Dumke (forthcoming). A Pantheist in Spite of Himself: Craig, Hegel, and Divine Infinity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-15.
    In his 2006 paper `Pantheists in Spite of Themselves: God and Infinity in Contemporary Theology,’ William Lane Craig examines the work of Wolfhart Pannenberg, Philip Clayton, and F. LeRon Shults, whose conceptions of God are influenced by Hegel. Craig shows that these thinkers’ Hegelian formulations lead to monism, despite their attempts to avoid it. He then attempts to refute Hegelian thinking by appealing to Cantor. I argue that that this refutation fails because Cantor and Hegel are far more amicable than (...)
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  11.  6
    Leonard Irwin Eisenberg (forthcoming). A New Natural Interpretation of the Empty Tomb. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-11.
    Clues in the Gospels, evidence from Jewish historian Josephus, belief in the transmigration of souls, and well-documented examples of erroneous declarations of death, combine to support a natural explanation for the Easter story: Jesus survives his short stay on the cross, and is discovered to be barely alive by the few followers who retrieve him. Fearful because they have illegally retrieved a condemned man, they carry out a decoy burial in a tomb. Jesus expires soon after, and is buried quietly (...)
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  12.  15
    Dan-Johan Eklund (forthcoming). The Nature of Faith in Analytic Theistic Philosophy of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-15.
    In this article I shall analyse and evaluate analytic theists’ views of what it takes to be a person of faith. I suggest that the subject can be approached by posing requirements a person must allegedly fulfil in order to count as a person of faith. These requirements can be referred to as aspects of faith. According to my analysis, four different aspects of faith can be distinguished: the cognitive, the evaluative-affective, the practical, and the interpersonal. There have been divergent (...)
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  13.  4
    Andrew Eshleman (forthcoming). The Afterlife: Beyond Belief. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-21.
    When a Christian refers to the future full realization of the kingdom of God in an afterlife, it is typically assumed that she is expressing beliefs about the existence and activity of God in conjunction with supernatural beliefs about an otherworldly realm and the possibility of one’s personal survival after bodily death. In other words, the religious language is interpreted in a realist fashion and the religious person here is construed as a religious believer. A corollary of this widely-held realist (...)
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  14.  7
    Joshua Farris (forthcoming). Jeffrey E. Brower: Aquinas’s Ontology of the Material World: Change, Hylomorphism, and Material Objects. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-4.
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  15.  5
    Melissa Frankel (forthcoming). Berkeley on the “Twofold State of Things”. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-18.
    Berkeley writes in his Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous that he “acknowledge[s] a twofold state of things, the one ectypal or natural, the other archetypal and eternal[.] The former was created in time; the latter existed from everlasting in the mind of God”. On a straightforward reading of this passage, it looks as though Berkeley is an indirect perception theorist, who thinks that our sensory ideas are copies or resemblances of archetypal divine ideas. But this is problematic because Berkeley’s (...)
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  16.  6
    Mark Q. Gardiner (forthcoming). Semantic Holism and Methodological Constraints in the Study of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-19.
    The methodology implicit in empirically grounded social scientific studies of religion naturally allies with forms of semantic holism. However, a well known argument which questions whether holism in general is consistent with the fact that languages are learnable can be extended into an epistemological one which questions whether holism is consistent with an empirical methodology. In other words, there is question whether holism, in fact, makes social science possible. I diagnose the assumptions on which that objection rests, pointing out that (...)
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  17.  38
    A. Harvevany (forthcoming). The Ethics of Belief and Two Conceptions of Christian Faith. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    This article deals with two types of Christian faith in the light of the challenges posed by the ethics of belief. It is proposed that the difficulties with Clifford’s formulation of that ethic can best be handled if the ethic is interpreted in terms of role-specific intellectual integrity. But the ethic still poses issues for the traditional interpretation of Christian faith when it is conceived as a series of discrete but related propositions, especially historical propositions. For as so conceived, the (...)
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  18.  32
    David Killoren (forthcoming). Robust Moral Realism: An Excellent Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-15.
    According to robust moral realism, there exist objective, non-natural moral facts. Moral facts of this sort do not fit easily into the world as illuminated by natural science. Further, if such facts exist at all, it is hard to see how we could know of their existence by any familiar means. Yet robust realists are not moral skeptics; they believe that we do know the moral facts. Thus robust moral realism comes with a number of hard-to-defend ontological and epistemological commitments. (...)
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  19.  11
    Raphael Lataster & Herman Philipse (forthcoming). The Problem of Polytheisms: A Serious Challenge to Theism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-14.
    Theistic and analytic philosophers of religion typically privilege classical theism and monotheism by ignoring or underestimating the great threat of polytheism. We develop an argument from infinitely many alternatives, which decisively demonstrates that if a monotheistic or polytheistic god-model obtains, it will almost certainly be polytheistic. Probabilistic calculations are performed in order to illustrate the difficulties faced by the monotheistic proponent. After considering possible objections, such as whether there should be limits placed on how many possible god-models could obtain, we (...)
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  20.  3
    Beryl Logan (forthcoming). Andre C. Willis: Toward a Humean True Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-3.
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  21.  6
    Cei Maslen (forthcoming). Pragmatic Decisions About God From Different Points of View: The Costs of Apostasy. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-11.
    Pascal, with his famous wager, argued in favour of religious practice and faith by appeal to expected payoffs. Here I discuss an asymmetry in similar pragmatic arguments for decisions about God. I begin with the observation that apostates pay costs not shared by those who never adopt a religion in the first place. Noticing this asymmetry shows these arguments from a new perspective and may also contribute to an explanation of the endurance of religion.
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  22.  15
    David S. Oderberg (forthcoming). Divine Premotion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-16.
    According to divine premotionism, God does not merely create and sustain the universe. He also moves all secondary causes to action as instruments without undermining their intrinsic causal efficacy. I explain and uphold the premotionist theory, which is the theory of St Thomas Aquinas and his most prominent exponents. I defend the premotionist interpretation of Aquinas in some textual detail, with particular reference to Suarez and to a recent paper by Louis Mancha. Critics, including Molinists and Suarezians, raise various objections (...)
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  23.  5
    R. J. Ray (forthcoming). Reza Hosseini: Wittgenstein and Meaning in Life: In Search of the Human Voice. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-5.
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  24.  5
    David Robertson RemB Edwards, René F. Brabander Terence Penelhudem & Henry Berne (forthcoming). Books in Review. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
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  25. Anne Leona Cesarine Runehov (forthcoming). Why Evil Won't Go Away: A Philosophical Analysis of the Relationship Between Religions, Ideologies and Evil. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
     
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  26.  10
    Kegan J. Shaw (forthcoming). Religious Epistemological Disjunctivism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-19.
    This paper explores religious belief in connection with epistemological disjunctivism. It applies recent advances in epistemological disjunctivism to the religious case for displaying an attractive model of specifically Christian religious belief. What results is a heretofore unoccupied position in religious epistemology—a view I call ‘religious epistemological disjunctivism’. My general argument is that RED furnishes superior explanations for the sort of ‘grasp of the truth’ which should undergird ‘matured Christian conviction’ of religious propositions. To this end I first display the more (...)
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  27.  9
    Shanta Ratnayaka Stephen Skousgaard, J. Buckley John, Richard Hogan Robert Greenwood & S. McGinnis Robert (forthcoming). Books in Review. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
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  28.  15
    Nathaniel Gray Sutanto (forthcoming). Two Theological Accounts of Logic: Theistic Conceptual Realism and a Reformed Archetype-Ectype Model. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-22.
    In this essay I analyze two emerging theistic accounts of the laws of logic, one precipitated by theistic conceptual realism and the other from an archetype-ectype paradigm in Reformed Scholasticism. The former posits the laws of logic as uncreated and necessary divine thoughts, whereas the latter thinks of those laws as contingent, accommodated forms of a pre-existing archetypal rationality. After the analysis of the two accounts, I offer an explication of the theological rationale motivating the archetype-ectype model of the laws (...)
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  29.  8
    Claudia Welz (forthcoming). Difficulties in Defining the Concept of God: Kierkegaard in Dialogue with Levinas, Buber, and Rosenzweig. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-23.
    This article investigates difficulties in defining the concept of God by focusing on the question of what it means to understand God as a ‘person.’ This question is explored with respect to the work of Søren Kierkegaard, in dialogue with Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, and Emmanuel Levinas. Thereby, the following three questions regarding divine ‘personhood’ come into view: First, how can God be a partner of dialogue if he at the same time remains unknown and unthinkable, a limit-concept of understanding? (...)
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