Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Ciro De Florio & Aldo Frigerio (forthcoming). In Defense of the Timeless Solution to the Problem of Human Free Will and Divine Foreknowledge. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-24.
    In this paper, we will defend a particular version of the timeless solution to the problem of divine foreknowledge and human freedom. Our strategy is grounded on a particular temporal framework, which models the flow of time and a libertarian understanding of freedom. The propositions describing a certain act by an agent have an indeterminate truth value until the agent makes her choice; therefore, they become true or false when a decision is made. In order to account for this change (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Timothy D. Knepper (forthcoming). Mélanie V. Walton: Expressing the Inexpressible in Lyotard and Pseudo-Dionysius: Bearing Witness as Spiritual Exercise. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-4.
    All too often, the study of ineffability only looks on the bright side of life—mystical experiences of blissful unity, primordial grounds of overflowing fecundity, noetic truths of existential profundity. To some extent, this is true too for Mélanie V. Walton’s Expressing the Inexpressible in Lyotard and Pseudo-Dionysius: Bearing Witness as Spiritual Exercise, which turns to a “desperate love letter to God” —the eros-infused naming and unnaming of God in The Divine Names, a treatise by the sixth-century Neoplatonic-Christian Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite—for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Michael Almeida (forthcoming). T. Ryan Byerly: The Mechanics of Divine Foreknowledge and Providence: A Time-Ordering Account. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-5.
    One major aim of the book is to articulate a view of the mechanics of infallible divine foreknowledge that avoids commitment to causal determinism, explains how infallible foreknowledge is compatible with human freedom, and explains how God’s divine providence is compatible with human freedom and indeterministic events. The modest epistemic goal is to articulate a view that enjoys a not very low epistemic status. But even with such modest goals, I think the view cannot credibly be said to offer or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Alfred Archer (forthcoming). Divine Moral Goodness, Supererogation and The Euthyphro Dilemma. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-14.
    How can we make sense of God’s moral goodness if God cannot be subject to moral obligations? This question is troubling for divine command theorists, as if we cannot make sense of God’s moral goodness then it seems hard to see how God’s commands could be morally good. Alston argues that the concept of supererogation solves this problem. If we accept the existence of acts that are morally good but not morally required then we should accept that there is no (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Dennis Vanden Auweele (forthcoming). Schopenhauer on Religious Pessimism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-19.
    Schopenhauer’s bifurcation between optimistic and pessimistic religions is made, so I argue here, by means of five criteria: to perceive of existence as punishment, to believe that salvation is not attained through ‘works’, to preach compassion so as to lead towards ascetics, to manifest an aura of mystery around religious doctrines and to, at some deep level, admit to the allegorical nature of religious creeds. By clearly showing what makes up the ‘pessimism’ of a ‘pessimistic religion’, Schopenhauer’s own philosophical pessimism (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Sylvie Avakian (forthcoming). 'Undecidability' or 'Anticipatory Resoluteness' Caputo in Conversation with Heidegger. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-17.
    In this article I will consider John D. Caputo’s ‘radical hermeneutics’, with ‘undecidability’ as its major theme, in conversation with Martin Heidegger’s notion of ‘anticipatory resoluteness’. Through an examination of the positions of Caputo and Heidegger I argue that Heidegger’s notion of ‘anticipatory resoluteness’ reaches far beyond the claims of ‘radical hermeneutics’, and that it assumes a reconstructive process which carries within its scope the overtones of deconstruction, the experience of repetition and authenticity and also the implications of Gelassenheit. Further, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug (forthcoming). Escaping Hell but Not Heaven. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-7.
    Benjamin Matheson has recently critiqued the escapist account of hell that we have defended. In this paper we respond to Matheson. Building on some of our work in defense of escapism that Matheson does not discuss we show that the threat posed by Matheson’s critique is chimerical. We begin by summarizing our escapist theory of hell. Next, we summarize both Matheson’s central thesis and the main arguments offered in its defense. We then respond to those arguments.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Mikel Burley (forthcoming). Thomas D. Carroll: Wittgenstein Within the Philosophy of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-4.
    “Wittgenstein belongs to history,” writes Thomas Carroll at the beginning of his book (p. 1). But contrary to what many analytic philosophers think these days, Carroll’s point is not that Wittgenstein belongs only to history; rather, Carroll wants to highlight the relevance of Wittgenstein’s thought for contemporary philosophy of religion, and to do so, in part, by situating Wittgenstein within his historical context. More specifically, the book’s main aims are three: firstly, to question received interpretations of Wittgenstein and to thereby (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Elizabeth Burns (forthcoming). Classical and Revisionary Theism on the Divine as Personal: A Rapprochement? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-15.
    To claim that the divine is a person or personal is, according to Swinburne, ‘the most elementary claim of theism’ . I argue that, whether the classical theist’s concept of the divine as a person or personal is construed as an analogy or a metaphor, or a combination of the two, analysis necessitates qualification of that concept such that any differences between the classical theist’s concept of the divine as a person or personal and revisionary interpretations of that concept are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Elizabeth D. Burns (forthcoming). Pamela Sue Anderson: Re-Visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion: Reason, Love and Epistemic Locatedness. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-3.
    This book is both a revision and a re-visioning. Nine of the ten chapters are based on chapters or articles published elsewhere. Each is concerned with “re-visioning,” defined as looking back with fresh eyes at old ideas and texts and suggesting new areas of exploration. This re-visioning is directed at ideas about gender as these have been communicated either directly or indirectly in the topics and texts of analytic philosophy of religion. It is, however, conducted in the continental style , (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Yishai Cohen (forthcoming). Molinists (Still) Cannot Endorse the Consequence Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-16.
    Perszyk (Faith Philos 20:131–151, 2003) has argued that Molinists cannot consistently endorse the consequence argument because of a structurally similar argument for the incompatibility of true Molinist counterfactuals of freedom (CCFs) and the ability to do otherwise. Wierenga (in: Molinism: the contemporary debate, 2011) has argued that on the proper understanding of CCFs, there is a relevant difference between the consequence argument and the anti-Molinist argument. I argue that, even on Wierenga’s understanding of CCFs, there is in fact no relevant (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. J. Angelo Corlett & Josh Cangelosi (forthcoming). Atheism and Epistemic Justification. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-16.
    In a recent article in this journal, Andrew Johnson seeks to defend the “New Atheism” against several objections. We provide a philosophical assessment of his defense of contemporary atheistic arguments that are said to amount to bifurcation fallacies. This point of discussion leads to our critical discussion of the presumption of atheism and the epistemic justification of atheism.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jake H. Davis (forthcoming). Maria Heim: The Forerunner of All Things: Buddhaghosa on Mind, Intention, and Agency. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-6.
    Philosophers interested in what Buddhist ethics has to offer contemporary debates have largely focused on finding distinctively Buddhist reasons to choose to act ethically. But this may be to miss the point. Maria Heim’s recent study illustrates vividly how a very different conception of intention, agency, and ethics emerges from the canonical Pāli texts and the extensive commentaries on these attributed to the fifth-century author Buddhaghosa. She finds in this textual tradition a sophisticated moral anthropology and moral phenomenology, one that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. James DiCenso (forthcoming). Grace and Favor in Kant's Ethical Explication of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-23.
    This paper discusses Kant’s assessment of the religious idea of grace in relation to autonomous ethical practice. Following Kant’s own explanation of his methods and goals in interpreting religious ideas, my focus is on the ethical import of inherited religious concepts for human beings, rather than on literal theological dogmas concerning supernatural matters. I focus on how Kant’s inquiry into the ethical significance of the idea of grace is intertwined with another less recognized concept, that of favor (Gunst). The latter (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Travis Dumsday (forthcoming). Why Pan-Dispositionalism is Incompatible with Metaphysical Naturalism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-16.
    Pan-dispositionalism is one of the major theories in current analytic metaphysics concerning dispositional properties (i.e., causal powers / capacities / abilities) and how they relate to categorical properties (i.e., non-dispositional properties, paradigm cases of which include shape, size, structure etc.). According to pan-dispositionalists, all fundamental properties are dispositional in nature, such that any supposed categorical properties are either unreal or reducible in some way to the dispositional. I argue that if pan-dispositionalism is true then metaphysical naturalism (roughly the view that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ian Fraser (forthcoming). Charles Taylor, Mikhail Epstein and ‘Minimal Religion’. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-20.
    In A Secular Age Charles Taylor endorses Mikhail Epstein’s notion of ‘minimal religion’ as his preferred orientation to the good for Western secular society. This article examines the basis of Epstein’s ‘minimal religion’ which rests on the psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. It is shown that Freud’s theories are incompatible with Taylor’s own thought, and in the case of Jung, Epstein fails to develop the latter’s contribution to our understanding of religion. Moreover, although Taylor endorses Epstein’s work (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Benedikt Paul Göcke (forthcoming). Did God Do It? Metaphysical Models and Theological Hermeneutics. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-17.
    I start by way of clarifying briefly the problem of special divine intervention. Once this is done, I argue that laws of nature are generalizations that derive from the dispositional behaviour of natural kinds. Based on this conception of laws of nature I provide a metaphysical model according to which God can realize acts of special divine providence by way of temporarily changing the dispositions of natural entities. I show that this model does not contradict scientific practice and is consistent (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. A. Harvevany (forthcoming). The Ethics of Belief and Two Conceptions of Christian Faith. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    This article deals with two types of Christian faith in the light of the challenges posed by the ethics of belief. It is proposed that the difficulties with Clifford’s formulation of that ethic can best be handled if the ethic is interpreted in terms of role-specific intellectual integrity. But the ethic still poses issues for the traditional interpretation of Christian faith when it is conceived as a series of discrete but related propositions, especially historical propositions. For as so conceived, the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. John Henry (forthcoming). David Leech: The Hammer of the Cartesians: Henry More's Philosophy of Spirit and the Origins of Modern Atheism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-5.
    Henry More (1614–1687), the most influential of the so-called Cambridge Platonists, and arguably the leading philosophically-inclined theologian in late seventeenth-century England, has come in for renewed attention lately. He was the subject of a detailed intellectual biography in 2003 by Robert Crocker, and in 2012 Jasper Reid published a philosophically penetrating and enlightening study of More’s metaphysics (Crocker 2003; Reid 2012). David Leech’s study of More’s idiosyncratic concept of immaterial spirit—and the role that it plays in his philosophy and theology—is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. William M. Hutchins (forthcoming). Shams C. Inati: Ibn Sina’s Remarks and Admonitions: Physics and Metaphysics: An Analysis and Annotated Translation. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-3.
    Ibn Sina is arguably the most important and influential philosopher in the Islamic tradition. Al-Isharat wal-Tanbihat, two sections of which are included in this translation, is one of Ibn Sina’s key, definitive texts. It is an almost legendary work that perplexes the reader while instructing him. Inati’s translation, which is framed by her analysis and notes, demystifies this key text in the history of Islamic thought.She has also translated the other two sections of Remarks and Admonitions and published them separately (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Nayna Jivan, Eugene Thomas Long & Pataki Antal (forthcoming). Cumulative Index Volumes 1-38 (1970-1995). International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Patricia Altenbernd Johnson (forthcoming). Clayton Crockett, B. Keith Putt, and Jeffrey W. Robbins : The Future of Continental Philosophy of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-4.
    Edward Mooney describes Continental philosophy of religion as “marked by labor under the shadow of Nietzsche’s death of God, under the associated threats and realities of loss of unified authors, selves, texts, and ethics, and under the loss of confidence in epistemology, ontology, and representation” . The question this anthology of nineteen essays raises is what this labor may be after the deaths of Derrida, Deleuze, Foucault, and Levinas. Is there a future for Continental philosophy of religion? What labor do (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Michael S. Jones (forthcoming). Does Cognitive Humility Lead to Religious Tolerance? Reflections on Craig Versus Quinn. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-17.
    We’ve all heard the familiar saying, “ignorance is bliss.” It may also be true that “ignorance is intolerant.” But it seems to be at least sometimes true that intolerance is produced by something else: overconfidence in the truthfulness of one’s own opinions. Awareness of and avoidance of such overconfidence may be a path towards tolerating those with whom one disagrees. And this could be true in religion as well as in other areas of belief. In his 2005 article “On Religious (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Hermen Kroesbergen (forthcoming). ‘Superstition’ as a Contemplative Term: A Wittgensteinian Perspective. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-18.
    Can a contemplative philosopher describe a particular religious practice as superstitious, or is he thereby overstepping his boundaries? I will discuss the way in which the Wittgensteinian philosopher of religion D. Z. Phillips uses ‘Superstition’ as a contemplative term. His use of the distinction between genuine religion and superstition is not a weakness as is often supposed, but a necessity. Without contemplating ‘Superstition’ and ‘genuine religion’ Phillips would not have been able to elucidate the meaning that religious beliefs have in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Benjamin W. McCraw (forthcoming). Faith and Trust. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-18.
    This paper begins with the oft-repeated claim that having (religious) faith involves trust in God. Taking this platitude seriously requires at least two philosophical tasks. First, one must address the relevant notion of “trust” guiding the platitude. I offer a sketch of epistemic trust: arguing that epistemic trust involves several components: acceptance, communication, dependence, and confidence. The first duo concerns the epistemic element of epistemic trust and the second part delimit the fiducial aspect to epistemic trust. Second, one must also (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Benjamin W. McCraw (forthcoming). Laura Frances Callahan and Timothy O’Connor : Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-5.
    Let me begin with what I take to be the two most significant features of this collection. First, it addresses an area that is woefully under-discussed: the intersection of virtue epistemology and philosophy of religion. Each is a massively influential and important field in its own right, so bringing the two into dialogue makes tremendous sense. This collection accomplishes much in this regard but also underscores the amount of work that needs to be developed. Bringing together virtue epistemology, philosophy of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Sean Meslar (forthcoming). Transworld Depravity and Divine Omniscience. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-14.
    This paper argues against the sufficiency of Alvin Plantinga’s free will defense, as presented in God, freedom, and evil as a response to the logical problem of evil. I begin by introducing the fundamental issues present in the problem of evil and proceed to present Plantinga’s response. Next, I argue that, despite the argument’s wide acceptance in the field, a central notion to the defense, transworld depravity, is internally inconsistent and that attempts to resolve the problem would result in an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Justin Mooney (forthcoming). Best Feasible Worlds: Divine Freedom and Leibniz’s Lapse. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-11.
    William L. Rowe’s argument against divine freedom has drawn considerable attention from theist philosophers. One reply to Rowe’s argument that has emerged in the recent literature appeals to modified accounts of libertarian freedom which have the result that God may be free even if he necessarily actualizes the best possible world. Though in many ways attractive, this approach appears to lead to the damning consequence of modal collapse i.e., that the actual world is the only possible world. But appearances can (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Thomas Park (forthcoming). Faith in God Without Any Revelation? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-14.
    In this paper I introduce John D. Caputo’s view of the divine and argue against his claim that we can preserve faith in God while dropping the idea of divine revelation. Despite Caputo’s apophatic point of view, he makes two claims with regard to God, or ’the divine’. First, he claims that we all have a divine call for justice and compassion in us. Secondly, he claims that God’s kingdom comes true if we make it happen and that this is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Randy Ramal (forthcoming). Religious Concepts and Absolute Conceptions of the World. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-15.
    In this essay I discuss several questions related to the manner in which concepts generally, and religious concepts in particular, are formed. Are some concepts necessary in the sense that, considering the physical makeup of the natural world and our own bio-chemical, perceptual, and cognitive nature, these concepts had to emerge by necessity? If we put considerations of divine revelations aside, I ask regarding religious concepts, what would be the proper way of looking at how they came to be formed? (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. David Robertson RemB Edwards, René F. Brabander Terence Penelhudem & Henry Berne (forthcoming). Books in Review. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Anne Leona Cesarine Runehov (forthcoming). Why Evil Won't Go Away: A Philosophical Analysis of the Relationship Between Religions, Ideologies and Evil. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Nathan D. Shannon (forthcoming). The Epistemology of Divine Conceptualism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-8.
    Divine conceptualism takes all abstract objects to be propositions in the mind of God. I focus here on necessary propositions and contemporary claims that the laws of logic, understood as necessarily true propositions, provide us with an epistemic bridge to theological predication—specifically, to the claim that God exists. I argue that when contemporary versions of DC say ‘G/god’ they merely rename the notion of necessary truth, and fail to refer to God. Given that God is incomprehensible, epistemic access to the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. John R. Shook (forthcoming). Rationalist Atheology. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-20.
    Atheology, accurately defined by Alvin Plantinga, offers reasons why god’s existence is implausible. Skeptically reasoning that theological arguments for god fail to make their case is one way of leaving supernaturalism in an implausible condition. This ‘rationalist’ atheology appeals to logical standards to point out fallacies and other sorts of inferential gaps. Beyond that methodological marker, few shared tactics characterize atheists and agnostics stalking theological targets. If unbelief be grounded on reason, let atheology start from a theological stronghold: the principle (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Shanta Ratnayaka Stephen Skousgaard, J. Buckley John, Richard Hogan Robert Greenwood & S. McGinnis Robert (forthcoming). Books in Review. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Margaret Weck (forthcoming). Cumulative Index 2001-2005 (Volumes 49-58). International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Marget Weck (forthcoming). Cumulative Index 1996-2000 (Volumes 39-48). International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues