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Forthcoming articles
  1. Dorit Alt & Yariv Itzkovich (forthcoming). Assessing the Connection Between Students’ Justice Experience and Perceptions of Faculty Incivility in Higher Education. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-14.
    IntroductionIncivility is defined as an interpersonal misconduct involving disregard for others and a violation of norms of respect . This phenomenon has been extensively investigated in workplaces . However, only a few studies have focused their attention on the academic setting, investigating both student and faculty general incivilities .While previous studies’ theoretical framework was mainly informed by organizational and psychosocial theories , this study suggests viewing incivility through the lens of justice psychology, which examines individual justice concerns . According to (...)
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  2. Mariana Fontes Costdaa (forthcoming). Who Rules the Ruler? On the Misconduct of Journal Editors. Journal of Academic Ethics.
    There are very few (published) accounts of editorial misconduct, and those that do exist are almost exclusively focused on medicine-related areas. In the present article we detail a case of editorial misconduct in a rather underexplored domain, the social sciences. This case demonstrates that although legal systems provide different instruments of protection to avoid, compensate for, and punish misconduct on the part of journal editors, the social and economic power unbalance between authors and publishers suggests the importance of alternative solutions (...)
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  3. Jack Corman Francis Rolleston, Paddi O'Hara Serge Gauthier & Rod Schmaltz (forthcoming). Ethics Issues with Private Research Ethics Boards: A Breakout Session at the 2009 Ncehr National Conference. Journal of Academic Ethics.
    Research Ethics Boards (REBs) provide oversight for Canadians that research projects will comply with standards of ethics if the studies are carried out as described in the documents that have been approved. While REBs have traditionally been affiliated with institutions such as universities and hospitals, a number of factors - including the increased volume of research being conducted outside academic centres - have resulted in the establishment of some private or independent REBs. This, in turn, has raised concerns about the (...)
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  4. David C. Ison (forthcoming). The Influence of the Internet on Plagiarism Among Doctoral Dissertations: An Empirical Study. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-16.
    Plagiarism has been a long standing concern within higher education. Yet with the rapid rise in the use and availability of the Internet, both the research literature and media have raised the notion that the online environment is accelerating the decline in academic ethics. The majority of research that has been conducted to investigate such claims have involved self-report data from students. This study sought to collect empirical data to investigate the potential influence the prevalence of the Internet has had (...)
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  5. Ewa McGrail & J. Patrick McGrail (forthcoming). Exploring Web-Based University Policy Statements on Plagiarism by Research-Intensive Higher Education Institutions. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-30.
    Plagiarism may distress universities in the US, but there is little agreement as to exactly what constitutes plagiarism. While there is ample research on plagiarism, there is scant literature on the content of university policies regarding it. Using a systematic sample, we qualitatively analyzed 20 Carnegie-classified universities that are “Very High in Research.” This included 15 public state universities and five high-profile private universities. We uncovered highly varied and even contradictory policies at these institutions. Notable policy variations existed for verbatim (...)
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  6. Jennifer Minarcik & Ana J. Bridges (forthcoming). Psychology Graduate Students Weigh In: Qualitative Analysis of Academic Dishonesty and Suggestion Prevention Strategies. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-20.
    The current qualitative study investigated prevalence and types of academic integrity violations in psychology graduate students and solicited student recommendations for how academic institutions, professors, and peers may act to discourage or prevent its occurrence. Students were recruited through email lists and asked to participate in an online study with a series of open-ended questions assessing integrity violations and prevention recommendations. Results revealed academic integrity violations were relatively infrequent and most were of relatively low severity . Common antecedents to integrity (...)
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  7. Kathleen K. Molnar (forthcoming). Students’ Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty: A Nine-Year Study From 2005 to 2013. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-16.
    Students from a small, private, religious college and a large, public university completed questionnaires asking their perceptions of academic dishonesty at their institution. The questionnaires used a 5-point Likert scale to determine whether the students felt it was acceptable to cheat for a specific reason such as plagiarizing or copying homework both using and not using technology. Between fall 2005 and fall 2013, 1792 usable questionnaires were collected using similar methodology, questionnaires and respondents to control for possible extraneous variables. An (...)
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