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Forthcoming articles
  1. Timothy F. Murphy (forthcoming). A Thought Experiment in Life Prolongation: The Tortoise Transformation. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
    The value of extending the human lifespan remains a key philosophical debate in bioethics. In building a case against the extension of the species-typical human life, Nicolas Agar considers the prospect of transforming human beings near the end of their lives into Galapagos tortoises, which would then live on decades longer. A central question at stake in this transformation is the persistence of human consciousness as a condition of the value of the transformation. Agar entertains the idea that consciousness could (...)
     
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  2.  7
    Krista N. Watts (forthcoming). MDR-TB, Isolation, and Anomie: Has Anyone Referred to Social Work? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
    MDR-TB and admission to isolation can induce a situation in which individuals are normless, unable to achieve the social goals that they have learned to pursue. Described as anomie, this situation can induce deviant behaviour. Addressing the psychosocial ethics of MDR-TB and isolation, this paper responds to the call for consideration of resource allocation and liberty.
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  3.  6
    Diego Armus (forthcoming). On TB Vaccines, Patients’ Demands, and Modern Printed Media in Times of Biomedical Uncertainties: Buenos Aires, 1920–1950. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Reconstructing some of the experiences of people living with tuberculosis in Argentina in the first half of the twentieth century, as reflected not only in written and oral accounts but also in individual and collective actions, this article explores the ways in which patients came to grips with medical expertise in times of biomedical uncertainty. These negotiations, which inevitably included adaptations as well as confrontations, highlight a much less passive and submissive patient–physician relationship than is often assumed. Though patients were (...)
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  4.  1
    Michael Ashby (forthcoming). Transition and Dialectic: A Farewell, A Big Thank You, Some Medical Ethics and Some Reproduction. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-3.
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  5.  2
    Myles Balfe (forthcoming). Why Did U.S. Healthcare Professionals Become Involved in Torture During the War on Terror? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    This article examines why U.S. healthcare professionals became involved in “enhanced interrogation,” or torture, during the War on Terror. A number of factors are identified including a desire on the part of these professionals to defend their country and fellow citizens from future attack; having their activities approved and authorized by legitimate command structures; financial incentives; and wanting to prevent serious harm from occurring to prisoners/detainees. The factors outlined here suggest that psychosocial factors can influence health professionals’ ethical decision-making.
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  6.  9
    Marc Bekoff (forthcoming). Compassionate Conservation and the Ethics of Species Research and Preservation: Hamsters, Black-Footed Ferrets, and a Response to Rob Irvine: Comment on" Ethics of Species Research and Preservation" by Rob Irvine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
  7.  2
    Rafael Boscolo-Berto, Massimo Montisci, Silvia Secco, Carolina D’Elia, Rosella Snenghi, Guido Viel & Santo Davide Ferrara (forthcoming). Association Between Financial Conflicts of Interests and Supportive Opinions for Erectile Dysfunction Treatment. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    A conflict of interest is a situation in which a person has competing loyalties or interests that make it difficult to fulfil his or her duties impartially. Conflict of interest is not categorically improper in itself but requires proper management. A SCOPUS literature search was performed for publications on the efficacy/safety of Phospho-Di-Esterase Inhibitors for treating erectile dysfunction. A categorization tool was used to review and classify the publications as supportive/not-supportive for the discussed active ingredient and reporting or not reporting (...)
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  8. K. A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). The Intouchables: Written and Directed by Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano, 2011, Quad Productions (Clichy, 112 Minutes, French, Rated R). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
     
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  9. K. A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). Amour: Written and Directed by Michael Haneke, 2012, Produced by Wega Film, Les Films du Losange, and X-Filme Creative Pool (Paris, 127 Minutes, French with English Subtitles, Rated PG-13). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
     
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  10. Katrina A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). And If We All Lived Together?[Et Si on Vivait Tous Ensemble?]: Written and Directed by Stéphane Robelin, 2011, Les Films de la Butte (Paris, 96 Minutes, French with English Subtitles, Rated M). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
     
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  11.  7
    Fern Brunger (forthcoming). Guidelines for Teaching Cross-Cultural Clinical Ethics: Critiquing Ideology and Confronting Power in the Service of a Principles-Based Pedagogy. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-16.
    This paper presents a pedagogical framework for teaching cross-cultural clinical ethics. The approach, offered at the intersection of anthropology and bioethics, is innovative in that it takes on the “social sciences versus bioethics” debate that has been ongoing in North America for three decades. The argument is made that this debate is flawed on both sides and, moreover, that the application of cross-cultural thinking to clinical ethics requires using the tools of the social sciences within a principles-based framework for clinical (...)
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  12.  8
    Laura Y. Cabrera & Bernice S. Elger (forthcoming). Memory Interventions in the Criminal Justice System: Some Practical Ethical Considerations. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-9.
    In recent years, discussion around memory modification interventions has gained attention. However, discussion around the use of memory interventions in the criminal justice system has been mostly absent. In this paper we start by highlighting the importance memory has for human well-being and personal identity, as well as its role within the criminal forensic setting; in particular, for claiming and accepting legal responsibility, for moral learning, and for retribution. We provide examples of memory interventions that are currently available for medical (...)
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  13.  6
    Jane Carroll (forthcoming). The Ethics of Isolation for Patients With Tuberculosis in Australia. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-3.
    This case study examines the ethical dimensions of isolation for patients diagnosed with tuberculosis in Australia. It seeks to explore the issues of resource allocation, liberty, and public safety for wider consideration and discussion.
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  14.  4
    M. Murat Civaner, Harun Balcioglu & Kevser Vatansever (forthcoming). Medical Students’ Opinions About the Commercialization of Healthcare: A Cross-Sectional Survey. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    There are serious concerns about the commercialization of healthcare and adoption of the business approach in medicine. As market dynamics endanger established professional values, healthcare workers face more complicated ethical dilemmas in their daily practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the willingness of medical students to accept the assertions of commercialized healthcare and the factors affecting their level of agreement, factors which could influence their moral stance when market demands conflict with professional values. A cross-sectional study was (...)
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  15.  9
    Amanda Clacy, Rachael Sharman & Geoff Lovell (forthcoming). Return-to-Play Confusion: Considerations for Sport-Related Concussion: Comment on" Concussion-Driven Dilemmas in Sports Medicine: When Are Athletes Capable of Informed Refusal of Sports Medicine Care?" by Daniel Mellifont, Jamie Peetz, and Mark Sayers. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  16.  3
    Richard G. Cockerill & Lance Wahlert (forthcoming). Erratum To: AIDS Panic in the Twenty-First Century: The Tenuous Legal Status of HIV-Positive Persons in America. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-1.
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  17.  4
    Richard G. Cockerill & Lance Wahlert (forthcoming). Erratum To: AIDS Panic in the Twenty-First Century: The Tenuous Legal Status of HIV-Positive Persons in America. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-1.
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  18. Theodora Danylevich (forthcoming). De-Privatizing Self-Harm: Remembering the Social Self in How to Forget. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-8.
    This article reads Malu De Martino’s 2010 film Como Esqueçer as a case study in self-harm as a mode of expression and self-inquiry. Drawing on disability and queer theory, psychoanalysis, and sociology of medicine, the author argues that How to Forget charts a “crip” epistemology of self-harm and theorizes a “social self.” That is to say, the film models an orientation towards self-harm that offers a coalitional and social therapeutic understanding. Based on this reading, the author suggests the application of (...)
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  19.  6
    Bege Dauda, Yvonne Denier & Kris Dierickx (forthcoming). What Do the Various Principles of Justice Mean Within the Concept of Benefit Sharing? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-13.
    The concept of benefit sharing pertains to the act of giving something in return to the participants, communities, and the country that have participated in global health research or bioprospecting activities. One of the key concerns of benefit sharing is the ethical justifications or reasons to support the practice of the concept in global health research and bioprospecting. This article evaluates one of such ethical justifications and its meaning to benefit sharing, namely justice. We conducted a systematic review to map (...)
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  20.  2
    Megan A. Dean, Elizabeth Victor & Laura Guidry Grimes (forthcoming). Inhospitable Healthcare Spaces: Why Diversity Training on LGBTQIA Issues Is Not Enough. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    In an effort to address healthcare disparities in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer populations, many hospitals and clinics institute diversity training meant to increase providers’ awareness of and sensitivity to this patient population. Despite these efforts, many healthcare spaces remain inhospitable to LGBTQ patients and their loved ones. Even in the absence of overt forms of discrimination, LGBTQ patients report feeling anxious, unwelcome, ashamed, and distrustful in healthcare encounters. We argue that these negative experiences are produced by a variety (...)
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  21.  1
    Megan A. Dean, Elizabeth Victor & Laura Guidry-Grimes (forthcoming). Inhospitable Healthcare Spaces: Why Diversity Training on LGBTQIA Issues Is Not Enough. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    In an effort to address healthcare disparities in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer populations, many hospitals and clinics institute diversity training meant to increase providers’ awareness of and sensitivity to this patient population. Despite these efforts, many healthcare spaces remain inhospitable to LGBTQ patients and their loved ones. Even in the absence of overt forms of discrimination, LGBTQ patients report feeling anxious, unwelcome, ashamed, and distrustful in healthcare encounters. We argue that these negative experiences are produced by a variety (...)
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  22.  2
    Jonathan Hsy (forthcoming). Symptom and Surface: Disruptive Deafness and Medieval Medical Authority. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    This essay examines constructions of deafness in medieval culture, exploring how deaf experience disrupts authoritative discourses in three textual genres: medical treatise, literary fiction, and autobiographical writing. Medical manuals often present deafness as a physical defect, yet they also suggest how social conditions for deaf people can be transformed in lieu of treatment protocols. Fictional narratives tend to associate deafness with sin or social stigma, but they can also imagine deaf experience with a remarkable degree of sympathy and nuance. Autobiographical (...)
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  23. N. Jing-Bao (forthcoming). The West's Dismissal of the Khabarovsk Trial: Ideology, Evidence and International Bioethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
     
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  24.  9
    L. Syd M. Johnson (forthcoming). The Case for Reasonable Accommodation of Conscientious Objections to Declarations of Brain Death. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Since its inception in 1968, the concept of whole-brain death has been contentious, and four decades on, controversy concerning the validity and coherence of whole-brain death continues unabated. Although whole-brain death is legally recognized and medically entrenched in the United States and elsewhere, there is reasonable disagreement among physicians, philosophers, and the public concerning whether brain death is really equivalent to death as it has been traditionally understood. A handful of states have acknowledged this plurality of viewpoints and enacted “conscience (...)
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  25.  8
    Erin Koch (forthcoming). Negotiating “The Social” and Managing Tuberculosis in Georgia. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-9.
    In this paper I utilize anthropological insights to illuminate how health professionals and patients navigate and negotiate what for them is social about tuberculosis in order to improve treatment outcomes and support patients as human beings. I draw on ethnographic research about the implementation of the DOTS approach in Georgia’s National Tuberculosis Program in the wake of the Soviet healthcare system. Georgia is a particularly unique context for exploring these issues given the country’s rich history of medical professionalism and the (...)
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  26. Scott Lamont, Cameron Stewart & Mary Chiarella (forthcoming). Documentation of Capacity Assessment and Subsequent Consent in Patients Identified With Delirium. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-9.
    BackgroundDelirium is highly prevalent in the general hospital patient population, characterized by acute onset, fluctuating levels of consciousness, and global impairment of cognitive functioning. Mental capacity, its assessment and subsequent consent are therefore prominent within this cohort, yet under-explored.AimThis study of patients with delirium sought to determine the processes by which consent to medical treatment was attempted, how capacity was assessed, and any subsequent actions thereafter.MethodA retrospective documentation review of patients identified as having a delirium for the twelve months February (...)
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  27.  2
    Juhong Liao & Katrien Devolder (forthcoming). Intra-Family Gamete Donation: A Solution to Concerns Regarding Gamete Donation in China? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-8.
    Gamete donation from third parties is controversial in China as it severs blood ties, which are considered of utmost importance in Confucian tradition. In recent years, infertile couples are increasingly demonstrating a preference for the use of gametes donated by family members to conceive children—known as “intra-family gamete donation.” The main advantage of intra-family gamete donation is that it maintains blood ties between children and both parents. To date there is no practice of intra-family gamete donation in China. In this (...)
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  28.  6
    Lawrence Chew Loh, Sae Rom Chae, Jennifer E. Heckman & Daniel S. Rhee (forthcoming). Erratum To: Ethical Considerations of Physician Career Involvement in Global Health Work: A Framework. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-1.
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  29.  2
    David T. Mitchell & Sharon L. Snyder (forthcoming). The Matter of Disability. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-6.
    By ruling out questions of impairment from the social critique of disability, Disability Studies analyses establish a limit point in the field. Of course the setting of “limits” enables possibilities in multiple directions as well as fortifies boundaries of refusal. For instance, impairment becomes in DS simultaneously a productive refusal to interpret disabled bodies as inferior to non-disabled bodies and a bar to thinking through more active engagements with disability as materiality. Disability materiality such as conditions produced by ecological toxicities (...)
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  30.  1
    Charles Mpofu, Tarun Sen Gupta & Richard Hays (forthcoming). The Ethics of Medical Practitioner Migration From Low-Resourced Countries to the Developed World: A Call for Action by Health Systems and Individual Doctors. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    Medical migration appears to be an increasing global phenomenon, with complex contributing factors. Although it is acknowledged that such movements are inevitable, given the current globalized economy, the movement of health professionals from their country of training raises questions about equity of access and quality of care. Concerns arise if migration occurs from low- and middle-income countries to high-income countries. The actions of HICs receiving medical practitioners from LMICs are examined through the global justice theories of John Rawls and Immanuel (...)
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  31.  1
    Holly Louise Northam (forthcoming). Erratum To: Hard to Believe: Produced by Ken Stone and Irene Silber, 2015, Swoop Films and Stone Soup Productions. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-1.
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  32.  2
    Michaela Okninski (forthcoming). Determining a Child’s Best Interests When Parents Refuse Medical Treatment—CAHS V Kiszko & Anor [2016] FCWA 19. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
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  33.  2
    A. Olesen, S. N. Nor & L. Amin (forthcoming). Religious Scholars’ Attitudes and Views on Ethical Issues Pertaining to Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis in Malaysia. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis represents the first fusion of genomics and assisted reproduction and the first reproductive technology that allows prospective parents to screen and select the genetic characteristics of their potential offspring. However, for some, the idea that we can intervene in the mechanisms of human existence at such a fundamental level can be, at a minimum, worrying and, at most, repugnant. Religious doctrines particularly are likely to collide with the rapidly advancing capability for science to make such interventions. This (...)
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  34.  2
    Malcolm Parker (forthcoming). Getting the Balance Right: Conceptual Considerations Concerning Legal Capacity and Supported Decision-Making. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-13.
    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities urges and requires changes to how signatories discharge their duties to people with intellectual disabilities, in the direction of their greater recognition as legal persons with expanded decision-making rights. Australian jurisdictions are currently undertaking inquiries and pilot projects that explore how these imperatives should be implemented. One of the important changes advocated is to move from guardianship models to supported or assisted models of decision-making. A driving force behind these (...)
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  35.  6
    Emily Postan (forthcoming). Defining Ourselves: Personal Bioinformation as a Tool of Narrative Self-Conception. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-19.
    Where ethical or regulatory questions arise about an individual’s interests in accessing bioinformation about herself, the value of this information has traditionally been construed in terms of its clinical utility. It is increasingly argued, however, that the “personal utility” of findings should also be taken into account. This article characterizes one particular aspect of personal utility: that derived from the role of personal bioinformation in identity construction. The suggestion that some kinds of information are relevant to identity is not in (...)
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  36.  3
    Inez Raes, An Ravelingien & Guido Pennings (forthcoming). Donor Conception Disclosure: Directive or Non-Directive Counselling? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    It is widely agreed among health professionals that couples using donor insemination should be offered counselling on the topic of donor conception disclosure. However, it is clear from the literature that there has long been a lack of agreement about which counselling approach should be used in this case: a directive or a non-directive approach. In this paper we investigate which approach is ethically justifiable by balancing the two underlying principles of autonomy and beneficence. To overrule one principle in favour (...)
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  37.  1
    Emily Reeve, Petra Denig, Sarah N. Hilmer & Ruud ter Meulen (forthcoming). The Ethics of Deprescribing in Older Adults. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    Deprescribing is the term used to describe the process of withdrawal of an inappropriate medication supervised by a clinician. This article presents a discussion of how the Four Principles of biomedical ethics that may guide medical practitioners’ prescribing practices apply to deprescribing medications in older adults. The view of deprescribing as an act creates stronger moral duties than if viewed as an omission. This may explain the fear of negative outcomes which has been reported by prescribers as a barrier to (...)
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  38.  4
    Leigh E. Rich (forthcoming). For the New, the Former, and All Those Continuing On: We Offer Our Thanks. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
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  39.  1
    Katharina M. Ruhe, Eva De Clercq, Tenzin Wangmo & Bernice S. Elger (forthcoming). Relational Capacity: Broadening the Notion of Decision-Making Capacity in Paediatric Healthcare. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    Problems arise when applying the current procedural conceptualization of decision-making capacity to paediatric healthcare: Its emphasis on content-neutrality and rational cognition as well as its implicit assumption that capacity is an ability that resides within a person jeopardizes children’s position in decision-making. The purpose of the paper is to challenge this dominant account of capacity and provide an alternative for how capacity should be understood in paediatric care. First, the influence of developmental psychologist Jean Piaget upon the notion of capacity (...)
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  40.  2
    Gabrielle Samuel, Alan Cribb, John Owens & Clare Williams (forthcoming). Relative Values: Perspectives on a Neuroimaging Technology From Above and Within the Ethical Landscape. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    In this paper we contribute to “sociology in bioethics” and help clarify the range of ways sociological work can contribute to ethics scholarship. We do this using a case study of an innovative neurotechnology, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and its use to attempt to diagnose and communicate with severely brain-injured patients. We compare empirical data from interviews with relatives of patients who have a severe brain injury with perspectives from mainstream bioethics scholars. We use the notion of an “ethical landscape” (...)
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  41.  4
    David Shaw (forthcoming). The Virus of Vagueness in Authorship. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
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  42.  4
    Diego S. Silva, Angus Dawson & Ross E. G. Upshur (forthcoming). Reciprocity and Ethical Tuberculosis Treatment and Control. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    This paper explores the notion of reciprocity in the context of active pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis treatment and related control policies and practices. We seek to do three things: First, we sketch the background to contemporary global TB care and suggest that poverty is a key feature when considering the treatment of TB patients. We use two examples from TB care to explore the role of reciprocity: isolation and the use of novel TB drugs. Second, we explore alternative means of (...)
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  43.  8
    Nancy Sturman (forthcoming). Many Hurdles for the Translation of Species Preservation Research: Comment on" Ethics of Species Research and Preservation" by Rob Irvine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
  44.  2
    Marja Visser, Monique H. Mochtar & Fulco van der Veen (forthcoming). Open-Identity Sperm Donation: How Does Offering Donor-Identifying Information Relate to Donor-Conceived Offspring’s Wishes and Needs? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
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  45. Paul Walker & Terry Lovat (forthcoming). Dialogic Consensus In Clinical Decision-Making. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    This paper is predicated on the understanding that clinical encounters between clinicians and patients should be seen primarily as inter-relations among persons and, as such, are necessarily moral encounters. It aims to relocate the discussion to be had in challenging medical decision-making situations, including, for example, as the end of life comes into view, onto a more robust moral philosophical footing than is currently commonplace. In our contemporary era, those making moral decisions must be cognizant of the existence of perspectives (...)
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  46.  3
    T. M. Wilkinson & I. D. Dittmer (forthcoming). Should Children Be Given Priority in Kidney Allocation? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Kidneys for transplantation are scarce, and many countries give priority to children in allocating them. This paper explains and criticizes the paediatric priority. We set out the relevant ethical principles of allocation, such as utility and severity, and the relevant facts to do with such matters as sensitization and child development. We argue that the facts and principles do not support and sometimes conflict with the priority given to children. We next consider various views on how age or the status (...)
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  47.  7
    Sarah Winch, Michael Sinnott & Ramon Shaban (forthcoming). It Is Not Your Fault: Suggestions for Building Ethical Capacity in Individuals Through Structural Reform to Health Care Organisations: Comment on" Moral Distress in Uninsured Health Care" by Anita Nivens and Janet Buelow. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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