Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Tamara Kayali Browne (forthcoming). Is Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder Really a Disorder? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-18.
    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) was recently moved to a full category in the DSM-5 (the latest edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). It also appears set for inclusion as a separate disorder in the ICD-11 (the upcoming edition of the World Health Organization’s International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems). This paper argues that PMDD should not be listed in the DSM or the ICD at all, adding to the call to (...)
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  2. Muhammed O. Afolabi (forthcoming). Situating the Trovan Trial With the Use of Experimental Ebola Therapies Is Like Comparing an Apple With an Orange. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
    I read with great bewilderment the unconvincing arguments of Peter F. Omonzejele in his article “Ethical Challenges Posed by the Ebola Virus Epidemic in West Africa” published in the 11 issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry. While the author glaringly mixed up anthropological issues concerning the hygiene of hand-washing and safe burials in an article with a title clearly focused on ethical challenges, he failed to establish how the current Ebola epidemic ravaging some West Africa countries made these human (...)
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  3. Jimoh Amzat (forthcoming). The Question of Autonomy in Maternal Health in Africa: A Rights-Based Consideration. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Maternal mortality is still very high in Africa, despite progress in control efforts at the global level. One elemental link is the question of autonomy in maternal health, especially at the household level where intrinsic human rights are undermined. A rights-based consideration in bioethics is an approach that holds the centrality of the human person, with a compelling reference to the fundamental human rights of every person. A philosophical and sociological engagement of gender and the notion of autonomy within the (...)
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  4. Bernard Baertschi (forthcoming). Human Dignity as a Component of a Long-Lasting and Widespread Conceptual Construct. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    For some decades, the concept of human dignity has been widely discussed in bioethical literature. Some authors think that this concept is central to questions of respect for human beings, whereas others are very critical of it. It should be noted that, in these debates, dignity is one component of a long-lasting and widespread conceptual construct used to support a stance on the ethical question of the moral status of an action or being. This construct has been used from Modernity (...)
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  5. Marc Bekoff (forthcoming). Compassionate Conservation and the Ethics of Species Research and Preservation: Hamsters, Black-Footed Ferrets, and a Response to Rob Irvine: Comment on" Ethics of Species Research and Preservation" by Rob Irvine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
  6. Zara J. Bending (forthcoming). Reconceptualising the Doctor–Patient Relationship: Recognising the Role of Trust in Contemporary Health Care. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    The conception of the doctor–patient relationship under Australian law has followed British common law tradition whereby the relationship is founded in a contractual exchange. By contrast, this article presents a rationale and framework for an alternative model—a “Trust Model”—for implementation into law to more accurately reflect the contemporary therapeutic dynamic. The framework has four elements: (i) an assumption that professional conflicts (actual or perceived) with patient safety, motivated by financial or personal interests, should be avoided; (ii) an onus on doctors (...)
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  7. Belinda Bennett & Terry Carney (forthcoming). Planning for Pandemics: Lessons From the Past Decade. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    It is now 10 years since the disease we now know as SARS—severe acute respiratory syndrome—caused more than 700 deaths around the world and made more than 8,000 people ill. More recently, in 2009 the global community experienced the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century—the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. This paper analyses the major developments in international public health law relating to infectious diseases in the period since SARS and considers their implications for pandemic planning.
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  8. Neera Bhatia & James Tibballs (forthcoming). Deficiencies and Missed Opportunities to Formulate Clinical Guidelines in Australia for Withholding or Withdrawing Life-Sustaining Treatment in Severely Disabled and Impaired Infants. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    This paper examines the few, but important legal and coronial cases concerning withdrawing or withholding life-sustaining treatment from severely disabled or critically impaired infants in Australia. Although sparse in number, the judgements should influence common clinical practices based on assessment of “best interests” but these have not yet been adopted. In particular, although courts have discounted assessment of “quality of life” as a legitimate component of determination of “best interests,” this remains a prominent component of clinical guidelines. In addition, this (...)
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  9. Renee D. Boss, Gail Geller & Pamela K. Donohue (forthcoming). Conflicts in Learning to Care for Critically Ill Newborns: “It Makes Me Question My Own Morals. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    Caring for critically ill and dying patients often triggers both professional and personal growth for physician trainees. In pediatrics, the neonatal intensive care unit is among the most distressing settings for trainees. We used longitudinal narrative writing to gain insight into how physician trainees are challenged by and make sense of repetitive, ongoing conflicts experienced as part of caring for very sick and dying babies. The study took place in a 45-bed, university-based NICU in an urban setting in the United (...)
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  10. Renaud F. Boulanger (forthcoming). Developing Global Health Programming: A Guidebook for Medical and Professional Schools. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-3.
    Developing Global Health Programming: A Guidebook for Medical and Professional Schools , edited by Jessica Evert, Paul Drain, and Thomas Hall, is reviewed. In spite of some editorial shortcomings, the book is a terrific aggregation of resources and reflections on the state of global health education that leaves readers with a multitude of useful and diverse tools, as well as directions about where to find additional ones.
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  11. K. A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). The Intouchables: Written and Directed by Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano, 2011, Quad Productions (Clichy, 112 Minutes, French, Rated R). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  12. K. A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). Amour: Written and Directed by Michael Haneke, 2012, Produced by Wega Film, Les Films du Losange, and X-Filme Creative Pool (Paris, 127 Minutes, French with English Subtitles, Rated PG-13). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  13. Katrina A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). And If We All Lived Together?[Et Si on Vivait Tous Ensemble?]: Written and Directed by Stéphane Robelin, 2011, Les Films de la Butte (Paris, 96 Minutes, French with English Subtitles, Rated M). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  14. Katrina A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). Like Father, Like Son. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
    This is a review of the Japanese film, Like Father, Like Son. The movie tells the story of two families attempting to resolve the dilemma of learning that their 6-year old sons are actually not their biological children, but rather children swapped at birth by a nurse with malicious intent.
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  15. C. Brodsky (forthcoming). Remembering Stephanie. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-17.
    by Charlee BrodskyStephanie Byram was my friend. She died of breast cancer at age thirty-eight on June 9, 2001. She lived eight years after the disease was discovered.With her cancer diagnosis at age thirty, Stephanie’s life changed. She became more known to others than she would have otherwise. She always had a close circle of friends who were drawn to her because of her candor, her intellect, her impish humor, her steadiness, her sensitivity. But after her diagnosis, many more people (...)
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  16. Silvia Camporesi (forthcoming). The Ethics of the New Eugenics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    The Ethics of the New Eugenics, edited by Calum MacKellar and Christopher Bechtel ,An introductory “Note on the Text” states: “The research on which this book is based was commissioned by the Scottish Council on Human Bioethics. It is the result of the collective work of many individuals at the Scottish Council on Human Bioethics. Initial drafting and subsequent editing was the work of Calum MacKellar and Christopher Bechtel, as agreed to by the Ethics Committee of the Scottish Council on (...)
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  17. Amanda Clacy, Rachael Sharman & Geoff Lovell (forthcoming). Return-to-Play Confusion: Considerations for Sport-Related Concussion: Comment on" Concussion-Driven Dilemmas in Sports Medicine: When Are Athletes Capable of Informed Refusal of Sports Medicine Care?" by Daniel Mellifont, Jamie Peetz, and Mark Sayers. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  18. Rebecca Julia Cook (forthcoming). Off-Label Drug Use as a Consent and Health Regulation Issue in New Zealand. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-8.
    The term “off-label drug use” refers to drugs that have not yet acquired “approved” status or drugs that have acquired “approved” status but are used with a different dosage, route, or administration method other than that for which the drug has been approved. In New Zealand, the Medicines Act 1981 specifically allows for off-label drug use. However, this authority is limited by the Health and Disability Commissioner (Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights) Regulations 1996 and the common law, (...)
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  19. Chris Degeling, Christopher Mayes, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge & Ross Upshur (forthcoming). The Political and Ethical Challenge of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    This article critically examines current responses to multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and argues that bioethics needs to be willing to engage in a more radical critique of the problem than is currently offered. In particular, we need to focus not simply on market-driven models of innovation and anti-microbial solutions to emergent and re-emergent infections such as TB. The global community also needs to address poverty and the structural factors that entrench inequalities—thus moving beyond the orthodox medical/public health frame of reference.
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  20. Scott J. Fitzpatrick (forthcoming). Re-Moralizing the Suicide Debate. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    Contemporary approaches to the study of suicide tend to examine suicide as a medical or public health problem rather than a moral problem, avoiding the kinds of judgements that have historically characterised discussions of the phenomenon. But morality entails more than judgement about action or behaviour, and our understanding of suicide can be enhanced by attending to its cultural, social, and linguistic connotations. In this work, I offer a theoretical reconstruction of suicide as a form of moral experience that delineates (...)
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  21. Charlene Galarneau (forthcoming). Health Care Sharing Ministries and Their Exemption From the Individual Mandate of the Affordable Care Act. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    The U.S. 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act exempts members of health care sharing ministries from the individual mandate to have minimum essential insurance coverage. Little is generally known about these religious organizations and even less critical attention has been brought to bear on them and their ACA exemption. Both deserve close scrutiny due to the exemption’s less than clear legislative justification, their potential influence on the ACA’s policy and ethical success, and their salience to current religious liberty debates (...)
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  22. Mark Giancaspro (forthcoming). Reproductive Tissue and Contract. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
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  23. Bridget Haire (forthcoming). It's Time: The Case for PrEP as an Active Comparator in HIV Biomedical Prevention Trials. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    In July 2012, based on evidence from two major trials, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the use of combined oral tenofovir/emtricitabine as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for people at high risk of HIV acquisition. PrEP effectiveness is marred by poor adherence, however, even in trial populations, thus it is not a magic bullet for HIV prevention. It is, however, the most effective biomedical HIV prevention intervention available for people at high risk of HIV, particularly those who have receptive (...)
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  24. Cressida J. Heyes & Angela Thachuk (forthcoming). Queering Know-How: Clinical Skill Acquisition as Ethical Practice. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Our study of queer women patients and their primary health care providers (HCPs) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, reveals a gap between providers’ theoretical knowledge of “cultural competency” and patients’ experience. Drawing on Patricia Benner’s Dreyfusian model of skill acquisition in nursing, we suggest that the dissonance between the anti-heteronormative principles expressed in interviews and the relative absence of skilled anti-heteronormative clinical practice can be understood as a failure to grasp the field of practice as a whole. Moving from “knowing-that” to (...)
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  25. N. Jing-Bao (forthcoming). The West's Dismissal of the Khabarovsk Trial: Ideology, Evidence and International Bioethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
     
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  26. John Kleinsman & Sue Buckley (forthcoming). Facebook Study: A Little Bit Unethical But Worth It? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    Human research involving the use social media raises many of the same issues as medical research. The publication of a paper in June 2014 investigating “emotional contagion” received extensive publicity recently because of the methods used. The approach involved manipulating the “News Feeds” of Facebook users, but the participants were not informed of their involvement in the research and had no opportunity to consent or opt out. Some commentators have argued that although it would have been preferable to obtain informed (...)
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  27. David Levy, Ben Gadd, Ian Kerridge & Paul A. Komesaroff (forthcoming). A Gentle Ethical Defence of Homeopathy. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    Recent discourses about the legitimacy of homeopathy have focused on its scientific plausibility, mechanism of action, and evidence base. These, frequently, conclude not only that homeopathy is scientifically baseless, but that it is “unethical.” They have also diminished patients’ perspectives, values, and preferences. We contend that these critics confuse epistemic questions with questions of ethics, misconstrue the moral status of homeopaths, and have an impoverished idea of ethics—one that fails to account either for the moral worth of care and of (...)
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  28. Tea Logar, Phuoc Le, James D. Harrison & Marcia Glass (forthcoming). Teaching Corner: “First Do No Harm”: Teaching Global Health Ethics to Medical Trainees Through Experiential Learning. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    Recent studies show that returning global health trainees often report having felt inadequately prepared to deal with ethical dilemmas they encountered during outreach clinical work. While global health training guidelines emphasize the importance of developing ethical and cultural competencies before embarking on fieldwork, their practical implementation is often lacking and consists mainly of recommendations regarding professional behavior and discussions of case studies. Evidence suggests that one of the most effective ways to teach certain skills in global health, including ethical and (...)
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  29. Bertha Alvarez Manninen (forthcoming). Mutual Scorn Within the Abortion Debate: Some Parallels With Race Relations. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-17.
    By emphasizing the parallels between both racial vilification and the vilification that takes place when we discuss abortion in our society, I hope to provide a new perspective on the way the United States converses about this divisive issue. This perspective, in turn, can help us see how we can move forward from the stagnate polemics that have permeated the abortion debate in the United States for the past 40 years.
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  30. Melissa McCoy (forthcoming). Essay: Leaky Pipes. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
    In the face of great tragedy, the desire to pinpoint blame can be instinctual as a remedy for alleviating one’s conscience in a system that causes great suffering. However, to remedy the system that causes such suffering requires a critical analysis of the factors that perpetuate inequitable power structures. This is the story of a journey that broadened my lens of analysis with which to critically evaluate the harmful structural and social determinants magnified in resource-limited settings.
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  31. Pam McGrath, Nicole Rawson & Leonora Adidi (forthcoming). Diagnosis and Treatment for Vulvar Cancer for Indigenous Women From East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory: Bioethical Reflections. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    This paper explores the bioethical issues associated with the diagnosis and treatment of vulvar cancer for Indigenous women in East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia. Based on a qualitative study of a vulvar cancer cluster of Indigenous women, the article highlights four main topics of bioethical concern drawn from the findings: informed consent, removal of body parts, pain management, and issues at the interface of Indigenous and Western health care. The article seeks to make a contribution towards Indigenous health and (...)
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  32. Jenni Millbank (forthcoming). Rethinking “Commercial” Surrogacy in Australia. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    This article proposes reconsideration of laws prohibiting paid surrogacy in Australia in light of increasing transnational commercial surrogacy. The social science evidence base concerning domestic surrogacy in developed economies demonstrates that payment alone cannot be used to differentiate “good” surrogacy arrangements from “bad” ones. Compensated domestic surrogacy and the introduction of professional intermediaries and mechanisms such as advertising are proposed as a feasible harm-minimisation approach. I contend that Australia can learn from commercial surrogacy practices elsewhere, without replicating them.
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  33. Jill Murphy, Jennifer Hatfield, Kaosar Afsana & Vic Neufeld (forthcoming). Making a Commitment to Ethics in Global Health Research Partnerships: A Practical Tool to Support Ethical Practice. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    Global health research partnerships have many benefits, including the development of research capacity and improving the production and use of evidence to improve global health equity. These partnerships also include many challenges, with power and resource differences often leading to inequitable and unethical partnership dynamics. Responding to these challenges and to important gaps in partnership scholarship, the Canadian Coalition for Global Health Research conducted a three-year, multi-regional consultation to capture the research partnership experiences of stakeholders in South Asia, Latin America, (...)
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  34. Catherine Myser (forthcoming). Defining “Global Health Ethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-6.
    Some claim that “global health is public health” but most regard global health as a new field, rapidly emerging mostly at North American academic institutions . The term was first incorporated into University of California, San Francisco’s Institute for Global Health in 1999 and UCSF also inaugurated the first North American master of science in global health in 2009. Global health is commonly acknowledged to have historical precedents in tropical medicine and international health. All three fields are regarded as having (...)
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  35. An Ravelingien, Veerle Provoost & Guido Pennings (forthcoming). Open-Identity Sperm Donation: How Does Offering Donor-Identifying Information Relate to Donor-Conceived Offspring's Wishes and Needs? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    Over the past years, a growing number of countries have legislated open-identity donation, in which donor-conceived offspring are given access to the donor’s identity once the child has reached maturity. It is held that donor anonymity creates identity problems for such children similar to the “genealogical bewilderment” described within the adoption context. The study of the social and psychological effects of open-identity donation is still very much in its infancy, but what has been left unquestioned is whether (and to what (...)
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  36. Leigh E. Rich (forthcoming). How Do We Thank Thee? Let Us Count the Ways. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    “Beggar that I am, I am even poor in thanks.”— Hamlet, II.ii.272About four years ago, we at the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry realized the thankless don’t get thanked enough. It is, of course, built into the very definition of the category. And, yet, all those who fit this bill ceaselessly beat on—be it reviewing articles namelessly and without reward; offering guidance on papers and protocols; managing and editing manuscripts; taking on the tiring role of taskmaster; processing, paginating, promoting, and publishing; (...)
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  37. Bernadette Richards, Bill Madden & Tina Cockburn (forthcoming). Untangling the Surrogacy Web and Exploring Legal Duties Following the Discharge of Mental Health Patients. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-5.
    Untangling the Surrogacy WebSurrogacy agreements represent unique legal questions that must be answered with great care. In Australia we had the recent “Baby Gammy” scandal that involved an international surrogacy agreement and claims of abandonment of a child with Down’s syndrome. This story served to reinforce concerns that surrogacy turns children into a commodity that can be put to one side if expectations are not met. Of course, surrogacy agreements do not always end in this manner and often the outcome (...)
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  38. Horacio Rivera & Ana Isabel Vásquez-Velásquez (forthcoming). In-House Plagiarism and Editorial Unaccountability. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-3.
    A “Critical Perspectives” article in the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry on scientific integrity in Brazil summarizes several misconduct cases documented therein . To further reinforce the responsible conduct of research in developing countries and to fight against the unaccountability of many editors , we describe here a Mexican instance of alleged in-house plagiarism .In June 2011, we submitted a “Correspondence” note to a Nature group journal to expose what we claimed to be a breach of collegiality and inappropriate authorship in (...)
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  39. Pablo Simón-Lorda, Inés M. Barrio-Cantalejo & Patricia Peinado-Gorlat (forthcoming). Content of Public Health Ethics Postgraduate Courses in the United States. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-9.
    This paper evaluates the content of the syllabi of postgraduate courses on public health ethics within accredited schools and programs of public health in the United States in order to gain an awareness of the topics addressed within these courses. Methods: Data was gathered via the analysis of syllabi of courses on PHE. In 2012, information was requested by e-mail from the 48 schools and 86 PH programs accredited by the U.S. Council on Education for Public Health for 2012. The (...)
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  40. Claudia Slegers, Deborah Zion, Deborah Glass, Helen Kelsall, Lin Fritschi, Ngiare Brown & Bebe Loff (forthcoming). Why Do People Participate in Epidemiological Research? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Many assumptions are made about public willingness to participate in epidemiological research, yet few empirical studies have been conducted to ascertain whether such assumptions are correct. Our qualitative study of the public and of expert stakeholders leads us to suggest that people are generally prepared to participate in epidemiological research, particularly if it is conducted by a trusted public institution such as a government health department, charity, or university. However, there is widespread community distrust of research conducted or sponsored by (...)
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  41. Kearsley A. Stewart (forthcoming). Teaching Corner: The Prospective Case Study. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-5.
    Over the past decade, global health has emerged as one of the fastest growing academic programs in the United States. Ethics training is cited widely as an essential feature of U.S. global health programs, but generally it is not deeply integrated into the global health teaching and training curricula. A discussion about the pedagogy of teaching global health ethics is long overdue; to date, only a few papers specifically engage with pedagogy rather than competencies or content. This paper explores the (...)
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  42. Nancy Sturman (forthcoming). Many Hurdles for the Translation of Species Preservation Research: Comment on" Ethics of Species Research and Preservation" by Rob Irvine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
  43. Alison K. Thompson, Maxwell J. Smith, Christopher W. McDougall, Cécile Bensimon & Daniel Felipe Perez (forthcoming). With Human Health It’s a Global Thing”: Canadian Perspectives on Ethics in the Global Governance of an Influenza Pandemic. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-13.
    We live in an era where our health is linked to that of others across the globe, and nothing brings this home better than the specter of a pandemic. This paper explores the findings of town hall meetings associated with the Canadian Program of Research on Ethics in a Pandemic , in which focus groups met to discuss issues related to the global governance of an influenza pandemic. Two competing discourses were found to be at work: the first was based (...)
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  44. Kara Thompson & Rosalind McDougall (forthcoming). Restricting Access to ART on the Basis of Criminal Record. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    As assisted reproductive technologies become increasingly popular, debate has intensified over the ethical justification for restricting access to ART based on various medical and non-medical factors. In 2010, the Australian state of Victoria enacted world-first legislation that denies access to ART for all patients with certain criminal or child protection histories. Patients and their partners are identified via a compulsory police and child protection check prior to commencing ART and, if found to have a previous relevant conviction or child protection (...)
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  45. C. Tsai (forthcoming). Essay: Freedom. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
    This is a reflective essay written about the humanism evident in a cross-cultural patient–doctor encounter in an HIV clinic in Swaziland, Africa.
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  46. Sarah Winch, Michael Sinnott & Ramon Shaban (forthcoming). It Is Not Your Fault: Suggestions for Building Ethical Capacity in Individuals Through Structural Reform to Health Care Organisations: Comment on" Moral Distress in Uninsured Health Care" by Anita Nivens and Janet Buelow. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  47. Qing Yang & Geoffrey Miller (forthcoming). East–West Differences in Perception of Brain Death. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-15.
    The concept of brain death as equivalent to cardiopulmonary death was initially conceived following developments in neuroscience, critical care, and transplant technology. It is now a routine part of medicine in Western countries, including the United States. In contrast, Eastern countries have been reluctant to incorporate brain death into legislation and medical practice. Several countries, most notably China, still lack laws recognizing brain death and national medical standards for making the diagnosis. The perception is that Asians are less likely to (...)
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