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Forthcoming articles
  1. Marie Bismark & Jennifer Morris (forthcoming). The Legacy of the Cartwright Report: “Lest It Happen Again”. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-5.
    The 1987 Cartwright Report into events at New Zealand’s National Women’s Hospital catalysed sweeping changes to promote and protect patients’ rights. A generation on, it is comfortable to believe that such sustained and deliberate violations of patient rights “couldn’t happen here” and “couldn’t happen now.” And yet, contemporary examples beg a different truth. Three of Cartwright’s messages hold an enduring relevance for health practitioners and patients: the need for patients to be respected as people; to be supported to make informed (...)
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  2. Tamara Kayali Browne (forthcoming). Is Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder Really a Disorder? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-18.
    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) was recently moved to a full category in the DSM-5 (the latest edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). It also appears set for inclusion as a separate disorder in the ICD-11 (the upcoming edition of the World Health Organization’s International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems). This paper argues that PMDD should not be listed in the DSM or the ICD at all, adding to the call to (...)
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  3. Bernard Baertschi (forthcoming). Human Dignity as a Component of a Long-Lasting and Widespread Conceptual Construct. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    For some decades, the concept of human dignity has been widely discussed in bioethical literature. Some authors think that this concept is central to questions of respect for human beings, whereas others are very critical of it. It should be noted that, in these debates, dignity is one component of a long-lasting and widespread conceptual construct used to support a stance on the ethical question of the moral status of an action or being. This construct has been used from Modernity (...)
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  4. Marc Bekoff (forthcoming). Compassionate Conservation and the Ethics of Species Research and Preservation: Hamsters, Black-Footed Ferrets, and a Response to Rob Irvine: Comment on" Ethics of Species Research and Preservation" by Rob Irvine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
  5. Zara J. Bending (forthcoming). Reconceptualising the Doctor–Patient Relationship: Recognising the Role of Trust in Contemporary Health Care. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    The conception of the doctor–patient relationship under Australian law has followed British common law tradition whereby the relationship is founded in a contractual exchange. By contrast, this article presents a rationale and framework for an alternative model—a “Trust Model”—for implementation into law to more accurately reflect the contemporary therapeutic dynamic. The framework has four elements: (i) an assumption that professional conflicts (actual or perceived) with patient safety, motivated by financial or personal interests, should be avoided; (ii) an onus on doctors (...)
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  6. Belinda Bennett & Terry Carney (forthcoming). Planning for Pandemics: Lessons From the Past Decade. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    It is now 10 years since the disease we now know as SARS—severe acute respiratory syndrome—caused more than 700 deaths around the world and made more than 8,000 people ill. More recently, in 2009 the global community experienced the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century—the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. This paper analyses the major developments in international public health law relating to infectious diseases in the period since SARS and considers their implications for pandemic planning.
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  7. Jan L. Bernheim, Wim Distelmans, Arsène Mullie & Michael A. Ashby (forthcoming). Questions and Answers on the Belgian Model of Integral End-of-Life Care: Experiment? Prototype? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-23.
    This article analyses domestic and foreign reactions to a 2008 report in the British Medical Journal on the complementary and, as argued, synergistic relationship between palliative care and euthanasia in Belgium. The earliest initiators of palliative care in Belgium in the late 1970s held the view that access to proper palliative care was a precondition for euthanasia to be acceptable and that euthanasia and palliative care could, and should, develop together. Advocates of euthanasia including author Jan Bernheim, independent from but (...)
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  8. Neera Bhatia & James Tibballs (forthcoming). Deficiencies and Missed Opportunities to Formulate Clinical Guidelines in Australia for Withholding or Withdrawing Life-Sustaining Treatment in Severely Disabled and Impaired Infants. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    This paper examines the few, but important legal and coronial cases concerning withdrawing or withholding life-sustaining treatment from severely disabled or critically impaired infants in Australia. Although sparse in number, the judgements should influence common clinical practices based on assessment of “best interests” but these have not yet been adopted. In particular, although courts have discounted assessment of “quality of life” as a legitimate component of determination of “best interests,” this remains a prominent component of clinical guidelines. In addition, this (...)
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  9. K. A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). The Intouchables: Written and Directed by Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano, 2011, Quad Productions (Clichy, 112 Minutes, French, Rated R). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  10. K. A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). Amour: Written and Directed by Michael Haneke, 2012, Produced by Wega Film, Les Films du Losange, and X-Filme Creative Pool (Paris, 127 Minutes, French with English Subtitles, Rated PG-13). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  11. Katrina A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). And If We All Lived Together?[Et Si on Vivait Tous Ensemble?]: Written and Directed by Stéphane Robelin, 2011, Les Films de la Butte (Paris, 96 Minutes, French with English Subtitles, Rated M). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  12. Brandon Brown (forthcoming). Using the Ebola Outbreak as an Opportunity to Educate on Vaccine Utility. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
    The first domestic death from Ebola in the United States occurred in Texas in October 2014. Family members who were potentially exposed to the infected individual were legally and involuntarily quarantined. Quarantine may not be a recent normal practice in the United States, but it was used extensively during the influenza pandemic in the early 20th century. However, health care ethics comes into play when we quarantine someone whose infection status is unknown versus active. To prevent the spread of a (...)
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  13. Amanda Clacy, Rachael Sharman & Geoff Lovell (forthcoming). Return-to-Play Confusion: Considerations for Sport-Related Concussion: Comment on" Concussion-Driven Dilemmas in Sports Medicine: When Are Athletes Capable of Informed Refusal of Sports Medicine Care?" by Daniel Mellifont, Jamie Peetz, and Mark Sayers. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  14. Rebecca Julia Cook (forthcoming). Off-Label Drug Use as a Consent and Health Regulation Issue in New Zealand. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-8.
    The term “off-label drug use” refers to drugs that have not yet acquired “approved” status or drugs that have acquired “approved” status but are used with a different dosage, route, or administration method other than that for which the drug has been approved. In New Zealand, the Medicines Act 1981 specifically allows for off-label drug use. However, this authority is limited by the Health and Disability Commissioner (Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights) Regulations 1996 and the common law, (...)
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  15. Mary K. DeShazer (forthcoming). Documenting Women's Postoperative Bodies: Knowing Stephanie and “Remembering Stephanie” as Collaborative Cancer Narratives. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    Photographic representations of women living with or beyond breast cancer have gained prominence in recent decades. Postmillennial visual narratives are both documentary projects and dialogic sites of self-construction and reader-viewer witness. After a brief overview of 30 years of breast cancer photography, this essay analyzes a collaborative photo-documentary by Stephanie Byram and Charlee Brodsky, Knowing Stephanie (2003), and a memorial photographic essay by Brodsky written ten years after Byram’s death, “Remembering Stephanie” (2014). The ethics of representing women’s postsurgical bodies and (...)
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  16. John Devereux (forthcoming). Collateral Damage: A Patient, a New Procedure, and the Learning Curve. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
    This article is a review of the 2010 book Collateral Damage by Dan Walter.
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  17. William C. N. Dunlop (forthcoming). The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-5.
    In The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values, Sam Harris presents a case for basing moral principles on scientific investigation. He highlights some of the limits of traditional religious dogmas. Likewise, he critiques the excessive moral indecisiveness and ineptitude of some who hold a more liberal doctrine, calling this “moral relativism.” Harris also puts forward a thought-provoking argument as to how science can be used to create a superior moral framework. However, there are shortcomings with Harris’ argument, which (...)
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  18. Úna Fitzgerald (forthcoming). Bioethics: The Basics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-3.
    In the preface of Bioethics: The Basics, Alastair Campbell states that the challenge of writing such a book is to “describe the complexities of the subject in an accessible style.” I believe on the whole the author succeeds in meeting this challenge. Though there have been numerous books written on the topic of bioethics, this book makes a valuable contribution to the area, as it builds on previous literature and also incorporates new theories and challenges in the area of bioethics. (...)
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  19. Scott J. Fitzpatrick (forthcoming). Re-Moralizing the Suicide Debate. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    Contemporary approaches to the study of suicide tend to examine suicide as a medical or public health problem rather than a moral problem, avoiding the kinds of judgements that have historically characterised discussions of the phenomenon. But morality entails more than judgement about action or behaviour, and our understanding of suicide can be enhanced by attending to its cultural, social, and linguistic connotations. In this work, I offer a theoretical reconstruction of suicide as a form of moral experience that delineates (...)
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  20. Mark Giancaspro (forthcoming). Reproductive Tissue and Contract. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
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  21. Bridget Haire (forthcoming). It's Time: The Case for PrEP as an Active Comparator in HIV Biomedical Prevention Trials. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    In July 2012, based on evidence from two major trials, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the use of combined oral tenofovir/emtricitabine as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for people at high risk of HIV acquisition. PrEP effectiveness is marred by poor adherence, however, even in trial populations, thus it is not a magic bullet for HIV prevention. It is, however, the most effective biomedical HIV prevention intervention available for people at high risk of HIV, particularly those who have receptive (...)
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  22. Cressida J. Heyes & Angela Thachuk (forthcoming). Queering Know-How: Clinical Skill Acquisition as Ethical Practice. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Our study of queer women patients and their primary health care providers (HCPs) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, reveals a gap between providers’ theoretical knowledge of “cultural competency” and patients’ experience. Drawing on Patricia Benner’s Dreyfusian model of skill acquisition in nursing, we suggest that the dissonance between the anti-heteronormative principles expressed in interviews and the relative absence of skilled anti-heteronormative clinical practice can be understood as a failure to grasp the field of practice as a whole. Moving from “knowing-that” to (...)
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  23. N. Jing-Bao (forthcoming). The West's Dismissal of the Khabarovsk Trial: Ideology, Evidence and International Bioethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  24. David Levy, Ben Gadd, Ian Kerridge & Paul A. Komesaroff (forthcoming). A Gentle Ethical Defence of Homeopathy. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    Recent discourses about the legitimacy of homeopathy have focused on its scientific plausibility, mechanism of action, and evidence base. These, frequently, conclude not only that homeopathy is scientifically baseless, but that it is “unethical.” They have also diminished patients’ perspectives, values, and preferences. We contend that these critics confuse epistemic questions with questions of ethics, misconstrue the moral status of homeopaths, and have an impoverished idea of ethics—one that fails to account either for the moral worth of care and of (...)
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  25. Paul H. Mason (forthcoming). The Liminal Body. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
    If James has a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), he is at risk of developing active tuberculosis disease but he is not yet sick. LTBI is a liminal space between health and illness. Diagnosed with LTBI, James could be conceptualised as having a liminal body. Treatments for LTBI are available, but why would a person seek treatment for a disease he does not yet have? One thing is definite: James needs to be educated about the symptoms and severity of active tuberculosis (...)
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  26. Pam McGrath, Nicole Rawson & Leonora Adidi (forthcoming). Diagnosis and Treatment for Vulvar Cancer for Indigenous Women From East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory: Bioethical Reflections. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    This paper explores the bioethical issues associated with the diagnosis and treatment of vulvar cancer for Indigenous women in East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia. Based on a qualitative study of a vulvar cancer cluster of Indigenous women, the article highlights four main topics of bioethical concern drawn from the findings: informed consent, removal of body parts, pain management, and issues at the interface of Indigenous and Western health care. The article seeks to make a contribution towards Indigenous health and (...)
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  27. Stuart McLennan, Simon Walker & Leigh E. Rich (forthcoming). Should Health Care Providers Be Forced to Apologise After Things Go Wrong? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-5.
    The issue of apologising to patients harmed by adverse events has been a subject of interest and debate within medicine, politics, and the law since the early 1980s. Although apology serves several important social roles, including recognising the victims of harm, providing an opportunity for redress, and repairing relationships, compelled apologies ring hollow and ultimately undermine these goals. Apologies that stem from external authorities’ edicts rather than an offender’s own self-criticism and moral reflection are inauthentic and contribute to a “moral (...)
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  28. Jenni Millbank (forthcoming). Rethinking “Commercial” Surrogacy in Australia. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    This article proposes reconsideration of laws prohibiting paid surrogacy in Australia in light of increasing transnational commercial surrogacy. The social science evidence base concerning domestic surrogacy in developed economies demonstrates that payment alone cannot be used to differentiate “good” surrogacy arrangements from “bad” ones. Compensated domestic surrogacy and the introduction of professional intermediaries and mechanisms such as advertising are proposed as a feasible harm-minimisation approach. I contend that Australia can learn from commercial surrogacy practices elsewhere, without replicating them.
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  29. Peter F. Omonzejele (forthcoming). Ethical Challenges Posed by the Ebola Virus Epidemic in West Africa. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    This paper examines how people in West Africa are reacting to the Ebola virus disease, an epidemic presently prevalent in the region. Certain lifestyle changes are suggested. Additionally, the heart of the paper focuses on the request by governments to be allowed access to experimental drugs, such as Zmapp and TKM-Ebola, for their infected populations. The author argues that granting such a request would circumvent research ethics procedures, which could potentially constitute significant risk to users of the drugs. The Pfizer (...)
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  30. Andrew Perechocky (forthcoming). Los Torturadores Medicos: Medical Collusion With Human Rights Abuses in Argentina, 1976–1983. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-13.
    Medical collaboration with authoritarian regimes historically has served to facilitate the use of torture as a tool of repression and to justify atrocities with the language of public health. Because scholarship on medicalized killing and biomedicalist rhetoric and ideology is heavily focused on Nazi Germany, this article seeks to expand the discourse to include other periods in which medicalized torture occurred, specifically in Argentina from 1976 to 1983, when the country was ruled by the Proceso de Reorganización Nacional military regime. (...)
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  31. Monika Monika Pietrzak-Franger & Martha Stoddard Holmes (forthcoming). Disease, Communication, and the Ethics of (In) Visibility. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    As the recent Ebola outbreak demonstrates, visibility is central to the shaping of political, medical, and socioeconomic decisions. The symposium in this issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry explores the uneasy relationship between the necessity of making diseases visible, the mechanisms of legal and visual censorship, and the overall ethics of viewing and spectatorship, including the effects of media visibility on the perception of particular “marked” bodies. Scholarship across the disciplines of communication, anthropology, gender studies, and visual studies, as (...)
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  32. An Ravelingien, Veerle Provoost & Guido Pennings (forthcoming). Open-Identity Sperm Donation: How Does Offering Donor-Identifying Information Relate to Donor-Conceived Offspring's Wishes and Needs? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    Over the past years, a growing number of countries have legislated open-identity donation, in which donor-conceived offspring are given access to the donor’s identity once the child has reached maturity. It is held that donor anonymity creates identity problems for such children similar to the “genealogical bewilderment” described within the adoption context. The study of the social and psychological effects of open-identity donation is still very much in its infancy, but what has been left unquestioned is whether (and to what (...)
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  33. Leigh E. Rich, Michael A. Ashby & David M. Shaw (forthcoming). Art, (In)Visibility, and Ebola. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    [V]isibility is central to the shaping of political, medical, and socioeconomic decisions. Who will be treated—how and where—are the central questions whose answers are often entwined with issues of (in)visibility … [and] the effects that media visibility has on the perception of particular bodies (Pietrzak-Franger and Stoddard Holmes 2014, ¶1–¶2).In a documentary entitled Paris: The Luminous Years (Adato 2010), writer Janet Flanner (who wrote for The New Yorker under the penname Genêt) describes the intense friendship of Pablo Picasso and Georges (...)
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  34. Bernadette Richards (forthcoming). Property in Tissue (Again) and Negligent Conception. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    Property in Human Tissue (Again)It seems that a recurring theme in our Recent Developments is the issue of property rights in tissue (see, for example, Stewart 2009; Richards, Madden, and Cockburn 2011; Giancaspro 2014). This has most commonly been associated with access to reproductive material and begins from the presumption of no property in tissue. A recent decision for the Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, whilst unsuccessful on largely procedural grounds, warrants a brief note because it adds to the general (...)
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  35. Carolyn Sargent & Stéphanie Larchanché (forthcoming). Disease, Risk, and Contagion: French Colonial and Postcolonial Constructions of “African” Bodies. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    In this article, we explore how sub-Saharan African immigrant populations in France have been constructed as risk groups by media sources, in political rhetoric, and among medical professionals, drawing on constructs dating to the colonial period. We also examine how political and economic issues have been mirrored and advanced in media visibility and ask why particular populations and the diseases associated with them in the popular imagination have received more attention at certain historical moments. In the contemporary period we analyze (...)
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  36. Pawan Singh, Lisa Cartwright & Cristina Visperas (forthcoming). African Kaposi's Sarcoma in the Light of Global AIDS: Antiblackness and Viral Visibility. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    Drawing on the theoretical frameworks of antiblackness and intersectionality and the concept of viral visibility, this essay attends to the considerable archive of research about endemic Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) in sub-Saharan Africa accrued during the mid-20th century. This body of data was inexplicably overlooked in Western research into KS during the first decade of the AIDS epidemic, during which period European and Mediterranean KS cases were most often cited as precedents despite the volume of African data available. This paper returns (...)
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  37. Nancy Sturman (forthcoming). Many Hurdles for the Translation of Species Preservation Research: Comment on" Ethics of Species Research and Preservation" by Rob Irvine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
  38. Paula A. Treichler (forthcoming). “When Pirates Feast … Who Pays?” Condoms, Advertising, and the Visibility Paradox, 1920s and 1930s. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-27.
    For most of the 20th century, the condom in the United States was a cheap, useful, but largely unmentionable product. Federal and state statutes prohibited the advertising and open display of condoms, their distribution by mail and across state lines, and their sale for the purpose of birth control; in some states, even owning or using condoms was illegal. By the end of World War I, condoms were increasingly acceptable for the prevention of sexually transmitted disease, but their unique dual (...)
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  39. Ross E. G. Upshur (forthcoming). Ebola Virus in West Africa: Waiting for the Owl of Minerva. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-3.
    The evolving Ebola epidemic in West Africa is unprecedented in its size and scope, requiring the rapid mobilization of resources. It is too early to determine all of the ethical challenges associated with the outbreak, but these should be monitored closely. Two issues that can be discussed are (1) the decision to implement and evaluate unregistered agents to determine therapeutic or prophylactic safety and efficacy and (2) the justification behind this decision. In this paper, I argue that it is not (...)
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  40. Simon R. Walters & Rosemary Godbold (forthcoming). Someone Is Watching You: The Ethics of Covert Observation to Explore Adult Behaviour at Children's Sporting Events. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    Concerns have been expressed about adult behaviour at children’s sporting events in New Zealand. As a consequence, covert observation was identified as the optimal research method to be used in studies designed to record the nature and prevalence of adult sideline behaviour at children’s team sporting events. This paper explores whether the concerns raised by the ethics committee about the use of this controversial method, particularly in relation to the lack of informed consent, the use of deception, and researcher safety, (...)
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  41. Sarah Winch, Michael Sinnott & Ramon Shaban (forthcoming). It Is Not Your Fault: Suggestions for Building Ethical Capacity in Individuals Through Structural Reform to Health Care Organisations: Comment on" Moral Distress in Uninsured Health Care" by Anita Nivens and Janet Buelow. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  42. Qing Yang & Geoffrey Miller (forthcoming). East–West Differences in Perception of Brain Death. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-15.
    The concept of brain death as equivalent to cardiopulmonary death was initially conceived following developments in neuroscience, critical care, and transplant technology. It is now a routine part of medicine in Western countries, including the United States. In contrast, Eastern countries have been reluctant to incorporate brain death into legislation and medical practice. Several countries, most notably China, still lack laws recognizing brain death and national medical standards for making the diagnosis. The perception is that Asians are less likely to (...)
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