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Forthcoming articles
  1. Timothy F. Murphy (forthcoming). A Thought Experiment in Life Prolongation: The Tortoise Transformation. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
    The value of extending the human lifespan remains a key philosophical debate in bioethics. In building a case against the extension of the species-typical human life, Nicolas Agar considers the prospect of transforming human beings near the end of their lives into Galapagos tortoises, which would then live on decades longer. A central question at stake in this transformation is the persistence of human consciousness as a condition of the value of the transformation. Agar entertains the idea that consciousness could (...)
     
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  2. Tamara Kayali Browne (forthcoming). Is Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder Really a Disorder? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-18.
    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) was recently moved to a full category in the DSM-5 (the latest edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). It also appears set for inclusion as a separate disorder in the ICD-11 (the upcoming edition of the World Health Organization’s International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems). This paper argues that PMDD should not be listed in the DSM or the ICD at all, adding to the call to (...)
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  3. Jimoh Amzat (forthcoming). The Question of Autonomy in Maternal Health in Africa: A Rights-Based Consideration. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Maternal mortality is still very high in Africa, despite progress in control efforts at the global level. One elemental link is the question of autonomy in maternal health, especially at the household level where intrinsic human rights are undermined. A rights-based consideration in bioethics is an approach that holds the centrality of the human person, with a compelling reference to the fundamental human rights of every person. A philosophical and sociological engagement of gender and the notion of autonomy within the (...)
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  4. Michael A. Ashby (forthcoming). In That Case: Necessary Limitation of Medical Treatment, Ageism, or Worse? A Policy Proposal for Limiting Kidney Dialysis Availability Over 75. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
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  5. Bernard Baertschi (forthcoming). Human Dignity as a Component of a Long-Lasting and Widespread Conceptual Construct. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    For some decades, the concept of human dignity has been widely discussed in bioethical literature. Some authors think that this concept is central to questions of respect for human beings, whereas others are very critical of it. It should be noted that, in these debates, dignity is one component of a long-lasting and widespread conceptual construct used to support a stance on the ethical question of the moral status of an action or being. This construct has been used from Modernity (...)
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  6. Marc Bekoff (forthcoming). Compassionate Conservation and the Ethics of Species Research and Preservation: Hamsters, Black-Footed Ferrets, and a Response to Rob Irvine: Comment on" Ethics of Species Research and Preservation" by Rob Irvine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
  7. Jean-Christophe Bélisle-Pipon & Bryn Williams-Jones (forthcoming). Drug Familiarization and Therapeutic Misconception Via Direct-to-Consumer Information. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-9.
    Promotion of prescription drugs may appear to be severely limited in some jurisdictions due to restrictions on direct-to-consumer advertising . However, in most jurisdictions, strategies exist to raise consumer awareness about prescription drugs, notably through the deployment of direct-to-consumer information campaigns that encourage patients to seek help for particular medical conditions. In Canada, DTCI is presented by industry and regulated by Health Canada as being purely informational activities, but their design and integration in broader promotional campaigns raise very similar ethical (...)
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  8. Zara J. Bending (forthcoming). Reconceptualising the Doctor–Patient Relationship: Recognising the Role of Trust in Contemporary Health Care. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    The conception of the doctor–patient relationship under Australian law has followed British common law tradition whereby the relationship is founded in a contractual exchange. By contrast, this article presents a rationale and framework for an alternative model—a “Trust Model”—for implementation into law to more accurately reflect the contemporary therapeutic dynamic. The framework has four elements: (i) an assumption that professional conflicts (actual or perceived) with patient safety, motivated by financial or personal interests, should be avoided; (ii) an onus on doctors (...)
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  9. Belinda Bennett & Terry Carney (forthcoming). Planning for Pandemics: Lessons From the Past Decade. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    It is now 10 years since the disease we now know as SARS—severe acute respiratory syndrome—caused more than 700 deaths around the world and made more than 8,000 people ill. More recently, in 2009 the global community experienced the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century—the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. This paper analyses the major developments in international public health law relating to infectious diseases in the period since SARS and considers their implications for pandemic planning.
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  10. Neera Bhatia & James Tibballs (forthcoming). Deficiencies and Missed Opportunities to Formulate Clinical Guidelines in Australia for Withholding or Withdrawing Life-Sustaining Treatment in Severely Disabled and Impaired Infants. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    This paper examines the few, but important legal and coronial cases concerning withdrawing or withholding life-sustaining treatment from severely disabled or critically impaired infants in Australia. Although sparse in number, the judgements should influence common clinical practices based on assessment of “best interests” but these have not yet been adopted. In particular, although courts have discounted assessment of “quality of life” as a legitimate component of determination of “best interests,” this remains a prominent component of clinical guidelines. In addition, this (...)
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  11. Renee D. Boss, Gail Geller & Pamela K. Donohue (forthcoming). Conflicts in Learning to Care for Critically Ill Newborns: “It Makes Me Question My Own Morals. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    Caring for critically ill and dying patients often triggers both professional and personal growth for physician trainees. In pediatrics, the neonatal intensive care unit is among the most distressing settings for trainees. We used longitudinal narrative writing to gain insight into how physician trainees are challenged by and make sense of repetitive, ongoing conflicts experienced as part of caring for very sick and dying babies. The study took place in a 45-bed, university-based NICU in an urban setting in the United (...)
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  12. K. A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). The Intouchables: Written and Directed by Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano, 2011, Quad Productions (Clichy, 112 Minutes, French, Rated R). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  13. K. A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). Amour: Written and Directed by Michael Haneke, 2012, Produced by Wega Film, Les Films du Losange, and X-Filme Creative Pool (Paris, 127 Minutes, French with English Subtitles, Rated PG-13). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  14. Katrina A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). And If We All Lived Together?[Et Si on Vivait Tous Ensemble?]: Written and Directed by Stéphane Robelin, 2011, Les Films de la Butte (Paris, 96 Minutes, French with English Subtitles, Rated M). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  15. Katrina A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). Like Father, Like Son. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
    This is a review of the Japanese film, Like Father, Like Son. The movie tells the story of two families attempting to resolve the dilemma of learning that their 6-year old sons are actually not their biological children, but rather children swapped at birth by a nurse with malicious intent.
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  16. Katrina A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). Words and Pictures. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
    This is a review of the 2013 film Words and Pictures. Surprisingly, the film is not about justifying a role for the humanities in education but, rather, a battle to determine which is more valuable—literature or art?. At a time when many schools question if these have any value at all, this film uses passionate and afflicted teachers to explore which is most important and finds valuable intersections between the two.
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  17. Silvia Camporesi (forthcoming). The Ethics of the New Eugenics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    The Ethics of the New Eugenics, edited by Calum MacKellar and Christopher Bechtel ,An introductory “Note on the Text” states: “The research on which this book is based was commissioned by the Scottish Council on Human Bioethics. It is the result of the collective work of many individuals at the Scottish Council on Human Bioethics. Initial drafting and subsequent editing was the work of Calum MacKellar and Christopher Bechtel, as agreed to by the Ethics Committee of the Scottish Council on (...)
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  18. Amanda Clacy, Rachael Sharman & Geoff Lovell (forthcoming). Return-to-Play Confusion: Considerations for Sport-Related Concussion: Comment on" Concussion-Driven Dilemmas in Sports Medicine: When Are Athletes Capable of Informed Refusal of Sports Medicine Care?" by Daniel Mellifont, Jamie Peetz, and Mark Sayers. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  19. Rebecca Julia Cook (forthcoming). Off-Label Drug Use as a Consent and Health Regulation Issue in New Zealand. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-8.
    The term “off-label drug use” refers to drugs that have not yet acquired “approved” status or drugs that have acquired “approved” status but are used with a different dosage, route, or administration method other than that for which the drug has been approved. In New Zealand, the Medicines Act 1981 specifically allows for off-label drug use. However, this authority is limited by the Health and Disability Commissioner (Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights) Regulations 1996 and the common law, (...)
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  20. Scott J. Fitzpatrick (forthcoming). Re-Moralizing the Suicide Debate. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    Contemporary approaches to the study of suicide tend to examine suicide as a medical or public health problem rather than a moral problem, avoiding the kinds of judgements that have historically characterised discussions of the phenomenon. But morality entails more than judgement about action or behaviour, and our understanding of suicide can be enhanced by attending to its cultural, social, and linguistic connotations. In this work, I offer a theoretical reconstruction of suicide as a form of moral experience that delineates (...)
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  21. Charlene Galarneau (forthcoming). Health Care Sharing Ministries and Their Exemption From the Individual Mandate of the Affordable Care Act. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    The U.S. 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act exempts members of health care sharing ministries from the individual mandate to have minimum essential insurance coverage. Little is generally known about these religious organizations and even less critical attention has been brought to bear on them and their ACA exemption. Both deserve close scrutiny due to the exemption’s less than clear legislative justification, their potential influence on the ACA’s policy and ethical success, and their salience to current religious liberty debates (...)
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  22. Mark Giancaspro (forthcoming). Reproductive Tissue and Contract. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
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  23. Ben Gray (forthcoming). Culturally Competent Bioethics: Analysis of a Case Study. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    This paper discusses the Saudi Arabian case by Abdallah Adlan and Henk ten Have, published in a 2012 issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry, regarding a congenitally disabled child enrolled in a research project examining the genetics of her condition. During the course of the study, her father was found not to be genetically related, and the case discussed the dilemma between disclosing to the family all findings as promised in consent documents or withholding paternity information because of the (...)
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  24. Bridget Haire (forthcoming). It's Time: The Case for PrEP as an Active Comparator in HIV Biomedical Prevention Trials. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    In July 2012, based on evidence from two major trials, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the use of combined oral tenofovir/emtricitabine as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for people at high risk of HIV acquisition. PrEP effectiveness is marred by poor adherence, however, even in trial populations, thus it is not a magic bullet for HIV prevention. It is, however, the most effective biomedical HIV prevention intervention available for people at high risk of HIV, particularly those who have receptive (...)
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  25. Cressida J. Heyes & Angela Thachuk (forthcoming). Queering Know-How: Clinical Skill Acquisition as Ethical Practice. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Our study of queer women patients and their primary health care providers (HCPs) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, reveals a gap between providers’ theoretical knowledge of “cultural competency” and patients’ experience. Drawing on Patricia Benner’s Dreyfusian model of skill acquisition in nursing, we suggest that the dissonance between the anti-heteronormative principles expressed in interviews and the relative absence of skilled anti-heteronormative clinical practice can be understood as a failure to grasp the field of practice as a whole. Moving from “knowing-that” to (...)
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  26. N. Jing-Bao (forthcoming). The West's Dismissal of the Khabarovsk Trial: Ideology, Evidence and International Bioethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
     
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  27. John Kleinsman & Sue Buckley (forthcoming). Facebook Study: A Little Bit Unethical But Worth It? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    Human research involving the use social media raises many of the same issues as medical research. The publication of a paper in June 2014 investigating “emotional contagion” received extensive publicity recently because of the methods used. The approach involved manipulating the “News Feeds” of Facebook users, but the participants were not informed of their involvement in the research and had no opportunity to consent or opt out. Some commentators have argued that although it would have been preferable to obtain informed (...)
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  28. David Levy, Ben Gadd, Ian Kerridge & Paul A. Komesaroff (forthcoming). A Gentle Ethical Defence of Homeopathy. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    Recent discourses about the legitimacy of homeopathy have focused on its scientific plausibility, mechanism of action, and evidence base. These, frequently, conclude not only that homeopathy is scientifically baseless, but that it is “unethical.” They have also diminished patients’ perspectives, values, and preferences. We contend that these critics confuse epistemic questions with questions of ethics, misconstrue the moral status of homeopaths, and have an impoverished idea of ethics—one that fails to account either for the moral worth of care and of (...)
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  29. Bertha Alvarez Manninen (forthcoming). Mutual Scorn Within the Abortion Debate: Some Parallels With Race Relations. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-17.
    By emphasizing the parallels between both racial vilification and the vilification that takes place when we discuss abortion in our society, I hope to provide a new perspective on the way the United States converses about this divisive issue. This perspective, in turn, can help us see how we can move forward from the stagnate polemics that have permeated the abortion debate in the United States for the past 40 years.
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  30. Pam McGrath, Nicole Rawson & Leonora Adidi (forthcoming). Diagnosis and Treatment for Vulvar Cancer for Indigenous Women From East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory: Bioethical Reflections. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    This paper explores the bioethical issues associated with the diagnosis and treatment of vulvar cancer for Indigenous women in East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia. Based on a qualitative study of a vulvar cancer cluster of Indigenous women, the article highlights four main topics of bioethical concern drawn from the findings: informed consent, removal of body parts, pain management, and issues at the interface of Indigenous and Western health care. The article seeks to make a contribution towards Indigenous health and (...)
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  31. Jenni Millbank (forthcoming). Rethinking “Commercial” Surrogacy in Australia. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    This article proposes reconsideration of laws prohibiting paid surrogacy in Australia in light of increasing transnational commercial surrogacy. The social science evidence base concerning domestic surrogacy in developed economies demonstrates that payment alone cannot be used to differentiate “good” surrogacy arrangements from “bad” ones. Compensated domestic surrogacy and the introduction of professional intermediaries and mechanisms such as advertising are proposed as a feasible harm-minimisation approach. I contend that Australia can learn from commercial surrogacy practices elsewhere, without replicating them.
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  32. Tom Mortier, René Leiva, Raphael Cohen-Almagor & Willem Lemmens (forthcoming). Between Palliative Care and Euthanasia. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
    In 2002, Belgium was the second country in the world to legalize euthanasia following the Netherlands. Since then, a few studies dealing with Belgium euthanasia practices have been published that are based on a survey given to a sample of physicians and nurses . All these studies from the past decade have implicitly proposed the practice of euthanasia as a medical act. Moreover, the last article published in this journal argued that the Belgian experiment concerning medical end-of-life decisions is unique (...)
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  33. An Ravelingien, Veerle Provoost & Guido Pennings (forthcoming). Open-Identity Sperm Donation: How Does Offering Donor-Identifying Information Relate to Donor-Conceived Offspring's Wishes and Needs? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    Over the past years, a growing number of countries have legislated open-identity donation, in which donor-conceived offspring are given access to the donor’s identity once the child has reached maturity. It is held that donor anonymity creates identity problems for such children similar to the “genealogical bewilderment” described within the adoption context. The study of the social and psychological effects of open-identity donation is still very much in its infancy, but what has been left unquestioned is whether (and to what (...)
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  34. Leigh E. Rich & Michael A. Ashby (forthcoming). Can a Company Be Bitchy?” Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
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  35. Bernadette Richards & Laura Williamson (forthcoming). Supporting Innovation in the UK: Care Act 2014. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-5.
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  36. Pablo Simón-Lorda, Inés M. Barrio-Cantalejo & Patricia Peinado-Gorlat (forthcoming). Content of Public Health Ethics Postgraduate Courses in the United States. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-9.
    This paper evaluates the content of the syllabi of postgraduate courses on public health ethics within accredited schools and programs of public health in the United States in order to gain an awareness of the topics addressed within these courses. Methods: Data was gathered via the analysis of syllabi of courses on PHE. In 2012, information was requested by e-mail from the 48 schools and 86 PH programs accredited by the U.S. Council on Education for Public Health for 2012. The (...)
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  37. Claudia Slegers, Deborah Zion, Deborah Glass, Helen Kelsall, Lin Fritschi, Ngiare Brown & Bebe Loff (forthcoming). Why Do People Participate in Epidemiological Research? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Many assumptions are made about public willingness to participate in epidemiological research, yet few empirical studies have been conducted to ascertain whether such assumptions are correct. Our qualitative study of the public and of expert stakeholders leads us to suggest that people are generally prepared to participate in epidemiological research, particularly if it is conducted by a trusted public institution such as a government health department, charity, or university. However, there is widespread community distrust of research conducted or sponsored by (...)
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  38. Nancy Sturman (forthcoming). Many Hurdles for the Translation of Species Preservation Research: Comment on" Ethics of Species Research and Preservation" by Rob Irvine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
  39. Kara Thompson & Rosalind McDougall (forthcoming). Restricting Access to ART on the Basis of Criminal Record. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    As assisted reproductive technologies become increasingly popular, debate has intensified over the ethical justification for restricting access to ART based on various medical and non-medical factors. In 2010, the Australian state of Victoria enacted world-first legislation that denies access to ART for all patients with certain criminal or child protection histories. Patients and their partners are identified via a compulsory police and child protection check prior to commencing ART and, if found to have a previous relevant conviction or child protection (...)
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  40. Çağrı Zeybek Ünsal, Duygu Akçay, Nüket Örnek Büken & Meral Özgüç (forthcoming). Bioethical Challenges of the Ebola Outbreak. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-3.
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  41. Sarah Winch, Michael Sinnott & Ramon Shaban (forthcoming). It Is Not Your Fault: Suggestions for Building Ethical Capacity in Individuals Through Structural Reform to Health Care Organisations: Comment on" Moral Distress in Uninsured Health Care" by Anita Nivens and Janet Buelow. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  42. Qing Yang & Geoffrey Miller (forthcoming). East–West Differences in Perception of Brain Death. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-15.
    The concept of brain death as equivalent to cardiopulmonary death was initially conceived following developments in neuroscience, critical care, and transplant technology. It is now a routine part of medicine in Western countries, including the United States. In contrast, Eastern countries have been reluctant to incorporate brain death into legislation and medical practice. Several countries, most notably China, still lack laws recognizing brain death and national medical standards for making the diagnosis. The perception is that Asians are less likely to (...)
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