Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Andrew Askland (forthcoming). Climate Change: Making Us Brothers and Sisters. Journal of Global Ethics:1-5.
    The constraint for prevailing ethical orientations is the unavoidable concern each person has for her own welfare. Climate change can transform the fundamental structure of these ethical orientations because it compels the recognition that the behaviors of those at the far reaches of my concentric circle model have real and potentially disastrous effects upon me. The tangible prospect of climate change will inspire the recognition of our common destiny.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Hans Cosson-Eide (forthcoming). The Wastefulness Principle. A Burden-Sharing Principle for Climate Change. Journal of Global Ethics:1-18.
    The prominent burden-sharing principles in the emerging literature of the political theory of climate change fail to sufficiently tackle the task they set out to solve. This paper sets out properties that an alternative principle should aim to meet. Based on these properties, it develops a consequentialist moral principle ? the wastefulness principle. This principle holds that it is wrong to waste a shared, scarce resource. The paper argues that this principle can be used to solve the question of who (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Susan Murphy (forthcoming). Unlocking the Beauty of the Imperfect Duty to Aid: Sen's Idea of the Duty of Assistance. Journal of Global Ethics:1-15.
    This paper examines the links between acting upon a duty to assist, responsibility for these actions, and how such actions link with incremental moral duties that can amass as a consequence of such action. More specifically, this paper is concerned with practices of international aid and assistance, whereby public and privately funded donations enable the actions of parties outside of the territorial and jurisdictional boundaries of a community and state to directly influence the functioning of that community, and the incremental (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Gottfried Schweiger (forthcoming). Recognition Theory and Global Poverty. Journal of Global Ethics:1-7.
    So far, recognition theory has focused its attention on modern capitalism and its formation in richer Western societies and has neglected issues of global poverty. A brief sketch of Axel Honneth's recognition theory precedes an examination of how the theory can contribute to a better understanding of global poverty, and justice in relation to poverty. I wish to highlight five ways in which recognition theory can enrich our inventory of theories dealing with global poverty and justice: It emphasizes the importance (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Rafał Wonicki (forthcoming). Global Ethics and Human Responsibility: Challenges for the Theory and the Discipline. Journal of Global Ethics:1-6.
    The aim of this article is to identify the main challenges for global ethics as an academic discipline. This article assesses the moral and practical justifications for common global principles. Individual and institutional responsibility on the supranational level is connected with the standard of human rights and the relational aspects of the globalised world. It also points out two separate problems which global ethics should aim to solve. The first is metatheoretical and methodological and concerns the discipline's lack of self-reflexiveness. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues