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  1.  3
    Gwilym David Blunt (2015). Justice in Assistance: A Critique of the ‘Singer Solution’. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (3):321-335.
    This article begins with an examination of Peter Singer's ‘solution’ to global poverty as a way to develop a theory of ‘justice in assistance.’ It argues that Singer's work, while compelling, does not seriously engage with the institutions necessary to relieve global poverty. In order to realise our obligations it is necessary to employ secondary agents, such as non-governmental organisations, that produce complex social relationships with the global poor. We should be concerned that the affluent and their secondary agents are (...)
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  2. Yvonne A. Braun, Michael C. Dreiling, Matthew P. Eddy & David M. Dominguez (2015). Up Against the Wall: Ecotourism, Development, and Social Justice in Costa Rica. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (3):351-365.
    Nearly one-quarter of Costa Rica's export earnings derive from an expanding tourist sector, one that is increasingly diversified in a mix of tourist niches. Ecotourism is the fastest growing niche and its promises are featured in a range of sites and practices, including the largest multinational hospitality and hotel corporations. These companies promote a vision of sustainability that relies on expanding consumption of ‘environmental' amenities through profit-driven global corporations – a vision that is, to some, antithetical to the very meaning (...)
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  3.  1
    Paula Casal & Nicole Selamé (2015). Sea for the Landlocked: A Sustainable Development Goal? Journal of Global Ethics 11 (3):270-279.
    Outside Europe landlocked states are poor: 16 are extremely poor and another 16 very poor. The Sustainable Development Goals recognise their lack of sea-access as a major cause of their reduced chances of escaping poverty and reaching the stated goals. This paper proposes including corridors to the sea and other forms of sea-access among the SDGs. It also discusses objections to doing so that appeal to the rejection of global egalitarian arguments, to the possibility of compensating those countries for their (...)
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  4. Jaakko Kuosmanen (2015). Repackaging Human Rights: On the Justification and the Function of the Right to Development. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (3):303-320.
    This paper focuses on examining the right to development. More specifically, the paper examines two questions relating to the right to development. The first focuses on the issue of justification: can the right to development that appears in the UN Declaration on the Right to Development be provided an adequate philosophical justification? The second question focuses on the function of the right to development: If the right to development simply ‘repackages’ duties correlative to other existing human rights – as it (...)
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  5.  27
    Eric Palmer (2015). Introduction: The 2030 Agenda. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (3):262-269.
    (Article part 2 of 2) This introduction notes the contributions of authors to the second issue of the Journal of Global Ethics 2015 Sustainable Development Goals Forum. It briefly explains the process through which the Sustainable Development Goals have developed from their receipt in 2014 to their passage in September 2015 by the UN General Assembly, and it considers their development in prospect. The Millennium Development Goals, which spanned 1990–2015, present a case study that reveals the changeability of such long-term (...)
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  6. Jan Pronk (2015). From Post 1945 to Post 2015. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (3):366-380.
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  7. Frances Stewart (2015). The Sustainable Development Goals: A Comment. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (3):288-293.
    The agreement on Sustainable Development Goals is a tremendous achievement. The goals represent an advance on the Millennium Development Goals, by aiming to eliminate poverty, by including an equality goal and by bringing sustainability into the agenda. Nonetheless, three outstanding issues remain. First, national ownership is likely to be a problem. The centrally agreed goals need to be interpreted nationally to allow for national priorities and circumstances and to secure national commitment to them. Secondly, the goals are silent on the (...)
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  8.  1
    Paul B. Thompson (2015). From World Hunger to Food Sovereignty: Food Ethics and Human Development. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (3):336-350.
    The role of Amartya Sen's early work on famine notwithstanding, food security is generally seen as but one capability among many for scholars writing in development ethics. The early literature on the ethics of hunger is summarized to show how Sen's Poverty and Famines was written in response to debates of past decades, and a brief discussion of food security as a capability follows. However, Sen's characterization of smallholder food security also supports the development of agency in both a political (...)
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  9.  1
    Johannes M. Waldmueller (2015). Agriculture, Knowledge and the ‘Colonial Matrix of Power’: Approaching Sustainabilities From the Global South. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (3):294-302.
    The proposed list of 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals sets out to reframe development according to a more holistic perspective. Yet, drawing on the example of the need for sustainable, resilient and biodiverse agriculture, it is argued here that the SDGs remain essentially grounded within one cultural understanding of how to address poverty. At least with regard to agriculture, the SDGs thus remain mono-cultural, one-dimensional, overly technocratic, and are far from universal as they fail to acknowledge the stipulated alternative pluriverse, (...)
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  10.  2
    Scott Wisor (2015). On the Structure of Global Development Goals. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (3):280-287.
    The design of global development goals has been beset by deep flaws, inconsistencies, and manifest unfairness to some developing countries. Momentum has now peaked for the creation of Sustainable Development Goals to replace the Millennium Development Goals. This comment addresses three challenges that arise in setting development goals, and recommends feasible development goals that can meaningfully guide development cooperation, and focus the attention of policy makers on the worst-off.
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  11.  3
    Vangelis Chiotis (2015). The Morality of Economic Behaviour. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (2):188-204.
    One approach to moral economy wishes to show that it is rational to be moral. As rational morality has received little attention from economics, as opposed to political philosophy, this article examines it in an economics framework. Rational morality refers primarily to individual behaviour so that one may also speak of it as moral microeconomics. When a group of agents are disposed to constrain their maximisation, that behaviour may be considered rational. However, this relies on ‘moralised’ assumptions about individual behaviour. (...)
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  12. Katarina Friberg (2015). Accounts Along the Aid Chain: Administering a Moral Economy. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (2):246-256.
    The purpose of this article is threefold. First, it aims to delineate the flow of resources and the claims on those resources within the humanitarian aid system by locating task structures and functional units across the aid chain. Second, it draws on this account to highlight tensions in the system. Different stations in the organisational process are conditioned by the tasks assigned to them, how those tasks are anchored in a moral economy, and their historical interrelations. Third, it explores how (...)
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  13. Katarina Friberg & Norbert Götz (2015). Introduction to the Thematic Issue ‘Moral Economy: New Perspectives’. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (2):143-146.
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  14. Rebecca Gill & Daryl Leeworthy (2015). Moral Minefields: Save the Children Fund and the Moral Economies of Nursery Schooling in the South Wales Coalfield in the 1930s. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (2):218-232.
    We trace the meeting and misalignment of competing moral economies in South Wales during the depression of the 1930s. Our case study is the Save the Children Fund's campaign to open emergency open-air nurseries in distressed communities and we analyse the contested meanings of work, voluntarism and cooperation that arose between charitable enterprises and local political organisers in the area. We also inquire into the attempt of a new generation of female political activists to shape a socialist moral economy of (...)
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  15.  2
    Norbert Götz (2015). ‘Moral Economy’: Its Conceptual History and Analytical Prospects. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (2):147-162.
    This article challenges E.P. Thompson's definition of ‘moral economy’ as a traditional consensus of crowd rights that were swept away by market forces. Instead, it suggests that the concept has the potential of improving the understanding of modern civil society. Moral economy was a term invented in the eighteenth century to describe many things. Thompson's approach reflects only a minor part of this conceptual history. His understanding of moral economy is conditioned by a dichotomous view of history and by the (...)
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  16.  1
    Carolina Holgersson Ivarsson (2015). Moral Economy Reconfigured: Philanthropic Engagement in Post-Tsunami Sri Lanka. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (2):233-245.
    This article focuses on the ‘gift of aid’ and its impact upon the local moral economy in a Sri Lankan village affected by the tsunami disaster in 2004. The importance of giving, receiving, and reciprocating for the shaping and consolidation of social relations has long been recognized. The act of giving reflects one of the most basic principles of morality and has constituted a classical anthropological field of inquiry. The impact that humanitarian aid had on the local moral economy of (...)
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  17.  1
    Jani Marjanen (2015). Moral Economy and Civil Society in Eighteenth-Century Europe: The Case of Economic Societies and the Business of Improvement. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (2):205-217.
    This article traces the moral economy of provincial elites who contributed to economic societies that were active in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Northern Europe. Such societies aimed at improving economic conditions in their respective cities, regions, or countries by advocating progressive methods of agriculture, manufacturing, and commerce. The commitment of members of these societies was not explicitly motivated by economic gains, but by a more complex system of beliefs fueled by the love of their country and the promotion of the (...)
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  18. Joakim Sandberg (2015). Moral Economy and Normative Ethics. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (2):176-187.
    ‘Moral economy’ has become a popular concept in empirical research in disciplines such as history, anthropology, sociology and political science. This research utilizes normative concepts and has obvious normative implications and relevance. However, there has been little to no dialogue between this research and philosophers working on normative ethics. The present article seeks to remedy this situation by highlighting fertile points of dialogue between descriptive and normative ethicists. The proposition is that empirical researchers can become more precise and stringent in (...)
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  19.  1
    Johanna Siméant (2015). Three Bodies of Moral Economy: The Diffusion of a Concept. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (2):163-175.
    This article explores some aspects of the renewed interest in moral economy and draws attention to the pitfalls if the concept is used too loosely. Edward P. Thompson and James C. Scott's model is examined to see how their elaboration of moral economy can be used to link food, popular indignation, reinvention of tradition, and relationships to the elite. Moral economy was an alternative to considering crowds as irrational, eruptive, or driven only by hunger. By studying how the notion of (...)
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  20.  2
    Clara Brandi (2015). Safeguarding the Earth System as a Priority for Sustainable Development and Global Ethics: The Need for an Earth System SDG. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):32-36.
    While the list of 17 Sustainable Development Goals proposed by the United Nations’ Open Working Group comprises a catalog of highly important post-2015 development priorities, one of the key issue that has not received the attention it deserves is the need to safeguard the Earth's life-support system. Over the course of the past decades, we have concentrated much more on socioeconomic development rather than on environmental sustainability while putting a number of the Earth's systems at risk, and with it poverty (...)
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  21.  1
    Luis Camacho (2015). Sustainable Development Goals: Kinds, Connections and Expectations. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):18-23.
    We point out the need to clarify some of the ideas related to the connection between development and sustainability in the Report of the Open Working Group of the General Assembly on Sustainable Development. In particular, the meaning of ‘sustainable’ is not clear when applied to specific areas of human activity. A more detailed explanation of the kind of equality sought for in the proposal is also needed. Because of potential conflicts between goals, we miss some considerations on the impact (...)
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  22.  3
    Sakiko Fukuda-Parr & Desmond McNeill (2015). Post 2015: A New Era of Accountability? Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):10-17.
    The Millennium Development Goals were criticised for failing to address the issue of governance, and the associated notions of responsibility and accountability. The Sustainable Development Goals, we argue, need to recognise the structural constraints facing poor countries – the power imbalances in the global economic system that limit their ability to promote the prosperity and well-being of their people, as was clearly brought out by the Commission on Global Governance for Health, of which we were both members [Ottersen, O. P., (...)
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  23.  4
    Claudia Garduño García (2015). Good Design as Design for Good: Exploring How Design Can Be Ethically and Environmentally Sustainable by Co-Designing an Eco-Hostel Within a Mayan Community. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):110-125.
    Designers acknowledge that their skills can assist the visualization and materialization of a desirable future and have gone as far as proposing that design can achieve societal change. Designing for a better world is associated with decreasing environmental depletion impacts while making good for both people and the environment, if possible. Evidently, this is a space where design deals with ethical matters, defining what is good or questioning if good has a universal meaning. This paper discusses the case of Aalto (...)
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  24.  3
    Anke Graness (2015). Is the Debate on ‘Global Justice’ a Global One? Some Considerations in View of Modern Philosophy in Africa. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):126-140.
    At present, the debate on global justice, a debate which is at the core of global ethics, is largely being conducted by European and American scholars from different disciplines without taking into account views and concepts from other regions of the world, particularly, from the Global South. The lack of a truly intercultural, interreligious, and international exchange of ideas provokes doubts whether the concepts of global justice introduced so far are able to transcend regional and cultural horizons. The article introduces (...)
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  25. Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala (2015). INTRODUCTION: The Theory and Practice of Global Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):65-67.
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  26.  2
    Matti Häyry & Simo Vehmas (2015). Disability as a Test of Justice in a Globalising World. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):90-98.
    This paper shows how most modern theories of justice could require or at least condone international aid aimed at alleviating the ill effects of disability. Seen from the general viewpoint of liberal egalitarianism, this is moderately encouraging, since according to the creed people in bad positions should be aided, and disability tends to put people in such positions. The actual responses of many theories, including John Rawls's famous view of justice, remain, however, unclear. Communitarian, liberal egalitarian, and luck egalitarian thinkers (...)
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  27.  2
    Sirkku K. Hellsten (2015). Ethics: Universal or Global? The Trends in Studies of Ethics in the Context of Globalization. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):80-89.
    The article discusses how theory and practice in global ethics affect each other. First, the author explores how the study of ethics has changed in the era of globalization and ponders what the role of the field of study of global ethics is in this context. Second, she wants to show how the logical fallacies in widening study field of ethics produce false polarizations between facts and value judgements in social ethics made in various cultural contexts. She further elaborates how (...)
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  28.  4
    Merata Kawharu (2015). Aotearoa: Shine or Shame? A Critical Examination of the Sustainable Development Goals and the Question of Poverty and Young Māori in New Zealand. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):43-50.
    As an international framework with broad support, the Sustainable Development Goals help to focus nations’ efforts on major issues and help policy-makers to specify areas of need for policy. While the goals are ambitious, they help to channel leaders’ thinking and action when goals are visible and normative. The goals also provide opportunity for first world nations, such as New Zealand, to examine how they apply to them. In terms of the predecessors to the SDGs, the Millennium Development Goals, New (...)
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  29.  4
    Jukka Mäkinen & Eero Kasanen (2015). In Defense of a Regulated Market Economy. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):99-109.
    The dominant understanding of political corporate social responsibility suggests new, broader political roles for businesses in the globalized economy, challenging the classical liberal social order. In this paper, we show how the major framing of the political CSR discussion not only challenges the classical liberal social order but also goes against the more general political economic perspective of the regulated market economy. We argue that this latter tendency of the political CSR discussion is its main weakness. We introduce a Rawlsian (...)
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  30.  4
    Shashi Motilal (2015). Sustainable Development Goals and Human Moral Obligations: The Ends and Means Relation. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):24-31.
    This paper aims at understanding Sustainable Development Goals as normative ends to be achieved by normative means in the context of global ethics. It distinguishes the descriptive and the normative senses of sustainability and development and puts forward a case for exploring the role of human moral obligations as the normative means to attain the goals of sustainable development. It argues that it is only when basic human moral obligations and role-related obligations are fulfilled that human well-being and that of (...)
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  31.  29
    Martha C. Nussbaum (2015). Political Liberalism and Global Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):68-79.
    This article argues that political liberalism, of the type formulated by John Rawls and Charles Larmore and further developed in Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach, is superior to more comprehensive political views both in domestic and in global affairs. Perfectionist liberalism as advocated by John Stuart Mill and Joseph Raz attempts to erase existing religions and replace them with the religion of utility or autonomy. This is wrong, because in the ethico-religious environment of reasonable disagreement that we inhabit (...)
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  32.  60
    Eric Palmer (2015). Introduction: The Sustainable Development Goals Forum. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):3-9.
    (Article part 1 of 2) This introduction notes the contributions of various authors to the first issue of the Journal of Global Ethics 2015 Forum and briefly explains the United Nations process through which the sustainable development goals have been formulated up to the receipt by the General Assembly, in August 2014, of the Report of the Open Working Group of the General Assembly on Sustainable Development Goals. The goals are identified as a confluence of distinct streams of UN work (...)
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  33.  14
    Thomas Pogge & Mitu Sengupta (2015). The Sustainable Development Goals: A Plan for Building a Better World? Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):56-64.
    Despite some clear positives, the draft text of the Sustainable Development Goals does not fulfill its self-proclaimed purpose of inspiring and guiding a concerted international effort to eradicate severe poverty everywhere in all of its forms. We offer some critical comments on the proposed agreement and suggest 10 ways to embolden the goals and amplify their appeal and moral power. While it may well be true that the world's poor are better off today than their predecessors were decades or centuries (...)
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  34.  2
    Francesca Pongiglione (2015). The Need for a Priority Structure for the Sustainable Development Goals. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):37-42.
    This article argues for the need to set priorities to Sustainable Development Goals. It proposes to assign primary focus on goals that, along with being ends in themselves, operate also as means for achieving other objectives – and are therefore of instrumental value also. Education is briefly analyzed as an example of one such goal. In addition, this article addresses population growth, an issue that is not explicitly mentioned in the SDGs but that is arguably relevant for sustainable development. Here (...)
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  35. Krushil Watene & Mandy Yap (2015). Culture and Sustainable Development: Indigenous Contributions. Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):51-55.
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