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  1.  6
    Steven G. Brown (2016). Supporting the Best Charities is Harder Than It Seems. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):240-244.
    ABSTRACTOnce upon a time, I attempted to create a web-based one-stop-shop for global poverty relief called the Maximin Project. Drawing on aspects of that experience, I show that although some existing ways of rating and recommending charities are significantly better than others, there remain certain challenges that need to be overcome. Specifically, I argue that the emerging Effective Altruism movement, with its emphasis on measurable effectiveness, runs the risk of neglecting a whole range of projects that are necessary for a (...)
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  2.  1
    Fredrik D. Hjorthen & Göran Duus-Otterström (2016). Humanitarian Intervention and Historical Responsibility. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):187-203.
    ABSTRACTSome suggest that the duty of humanitarian intervention should be discharged by states that are historically responsible for the occurrence of violence. A fundamental problem with this suggestion is that historically responsible states might be ill-suited to intervene because they are unlikely to enjoy support from the local population. Cécile Fabre has suggested a way around that problem, arguing that responsible states ought to pay for humanitarian interventions even though they ought not to take part in the military operations. We (...)
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  3.  4
    Violetta Igneski (2016). Living a Meaningful and Ethical Life in the Face of Great Need: Responding to Singer’s The Most Good You Can Do. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):147-153.
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  4.  2
    Tracy Isaacs (2016). The Most Good We Can Do: Comments on Peter Singer’s The Most Good You Can Do. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):154-160.
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  5.  3
    Peter Singer (2016). Precis: The Most Good You Can Do†. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):132-136.
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  6.  8
    Peter Singer (2016). The Most Good You Can Do: A Response to the Commentaries. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):161-169.
    ABSTRACTAnthony Skelton, Violetta Igneski and Tracy Isaacs share my view that our obligations to help people in extreme poverty go beyond what is conventionally accepted. Nevertheless, the other contributors argue that my view is too demanding, while noting some tensions between my different writings on this issue. I explain my position, drawing on Sidgwick’s distinction between what someone ought to do, and what we should praise or blame someone for doing or not doing. I also respond to the position that (...)
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  7. Anthony Skelton (2016). The Ethical Principles of Effective Altruism. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):137-146.
    This paper is an examination of the ethical principles of effective altruism as they are articulated by Peter Singer in his book The Most Good You Can Do. It discusses the nature and the plausibility of the principles that he thinks both guide and ought to guide effective altruists. It argues in § II pace Singer that it is unclear that in charitable giving one ought always to aim to produce the most surplus benefit possible and in § III that (...)
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  8.  36
    Anthony Skelton (2016). Introduction to the Symposium on The Most Good You Can Do. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):127-131.
    This is the introduction to the Journal of Global Ethics symposium on Peter Singer's The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism is Changing Ideas About Living Ethically. It summarizes the main features of effective altruism in the context of Singer's work on the moral demands of global poverty and some recent criticisms of effective altruism. The symposium contains contributions by Anthony Skelton, Violetta Igneski, Tracy Isaacs and Peter Singer.
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  9.  9
    Nathan Stout (2016). Assembling an Army: Considerations for Just War Theory. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):204-221.
    ABSTRACTThe aim of this paper is to draw attention to an issue which has been largely overlooked in contemporary just war theory – namely the impact that the conditions under which an army is assembled are liable to have on the judgments that are made with respect to traditional principles of jus ad bellum and jus in bello. I argue that the way in which an army is assembled can significantly alter judgments regarding the justice of a war. In doing (...)
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  10.  2
    Inna Viriasova (2016). The Refugee’s Flight: Homelessness, Hospitality, and Care of the Self. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):222-239.
    ABSTRACTThis paper argues that the contemporary international refugee regime is grounded in a paradigm of ‘homesickness’, which puts the refugee in an inferior position of the supplicant, whose subjectivity is framed by the regime of fixed belonging. In order to address this situation, we need to challenge the ontological primacy of homesickness and embrace ‘homelessness’, which offers the possibility of rethinking the positions of both refugees and non-refugees in ethical terms. While the responsibility of the non-refugees lies in cultivating an (...)
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  11.  1
    Timothy Weidel (2016). Philanthropy, Cosmopolitanism, and the Benefits of Giving Directly. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2):170-186.
    ABSTRACTIn the face of widespread poverty, Peter Singer argues that the best response is giving money to charitable organizations that give aid to the poor. In response, much criticism has been leveled by cosmopolitan philosophers that philanthropy is unable to effectively combat poverty for many reasons: such funds fall prey to corrupt bureaucrats, the poor will waste the money, or become dependent upon donations rather than providing for themselves. In this paper, I argue that the work of the organization GiveDirectly (...)
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  12.  1
    Sara Belfrage (2016). Exploitative, Irresistible, and Coercive Offers: Why Research Participants Should Be Paid Well or Not at All. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (1):69-86.
    ABSTRACTThis paper begins with the assumption that it is morally problematic when people in need are offered money in exchange for research participation if the amount offered is unfair. Such offers are called ‘coercive’, and the degree of coerciveness is determined by the offer's potential to cause exploitation and its irresistibility. Depending on what view we take on the possibility to compensate for the sacrifices made by research participants, a wish to avoid ‘coercive offers’ leads to policy recommendations concerning payment (...)
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  13.  2
    Alejandra Boni, Aurora Lopez-Fogues & Melanie Walker (2016). Higher Education and the Post-2015 Agenda: A Contribution From the Human Development Approach. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (1):17-28.
    ABSTRACTSustainable Development Goals will guide the global development agenda for the coming years. Under this premise, this article explores the role which higher education has been assigned in contributing to sustainable human development, and concludes that the vision of HE offered is too narrow and unable to capture the essence and full meaning of sustainable human development. Moving away from problematic indicators and thresholds that understand HE as a producer of human capital, the article proposes placing the concept of human (...)
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  14.  6
    Alasdair Cochrane & Steve Cooke (2016). ‘Humane Intervention’: The International Protection of Animal Rights. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (1):106-121.
    ABSTRACTThis paper explores the international implications of liberal theories which extend justice to sentient animals. In particular, it asks whether they imply that coercive military intervention in a state by external agents to prevent, halt or minimise violations of basic animal rights can be justified. In so doing, it employs Simon Caney's theory of humanitarian intervention and applies it to non-human animals. It argues that while humane intervention can be justified in principle using Caney's assumptions, justifying any particular intervention on (...)
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  15.  4
    Monique Deveaux (2016). Exploitation, Structural Injustice, and the Cross-Border Trade in Human Ova. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (1):48-68.
    ABSTRACTGlobal demand for human ova in in vitro fertilization has led to its expansion in countries with falling average incomes and rising female unemployment. Paid egg donation in the context of national, regional, and global inequalities has the potential to exploit women who are socioeconomically vulnerable, and indeed there is ample evidence that it does. Structural injustices that render women in middle-income countries – and even some high-income countries – economically vulnerable contribute to a context of ‘omissive coercion’ that is (...)
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  16.  8
    H. P. P. [Hennie] Lotter (2016). Humans as Professional Interactants with Elephants in a Global Commons. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (1):87-105.
    All current versions of ethics for human interaction with animals are based on theories originally developed for relationships between humans or for human understanding of the environment. The perceived analogies between relationships among humans those theories were designed for and the relationships between human and animals have led to specifically revised and adapted theories for ethical interaction between humans and animals. In this essay I propose two further analogies that I develop into one core argument to cover specific issues in (...)
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  17.  1
    Martin Prozesky (2016). Ethical Leadership Resources in Southern Africa's Sesotho-Speaking Culture and in King Moshoeshoe I. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (1):6-16.
    ABSTRACTThe problem addressed in this paper is the need for fresh resources for enhanced ethical leadership in South Africa and elsewhere in Africa. To respond to that problem the paper uses two valuable but insufficiently known sources from the culture of the Sesotho-speaking people of southern Africa, now found in Lesotho and much of South Africa's Free State province. The first one is a set of concepts that pertain to sound human relationships. The second one is Basotho history in the (...)
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  18.  5
    Joshua Schulz (2016). The Capabilities Approach and Catholic Social Teaching: An Engagement. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (1):29-47.
    ABSTRACTThis essay brings Martha Nussbaum's politically liberal version of the Capabilities Approach to human development into critical dialogue with the Catholic Social Tradition. Like CST, Nussbaum's focus on embodiment, dependence and dignity entails a social use of property which privileges marginalized people, and both theories explain the underdevelopment of central human capabilities in social rather than exclusively material terms. Whereas CST is metaphysically and theologically ‘thick', however, CA is ‘thin’: its proponents positively eschew metaphysical commitments, believing a commitment to quasi-Rawlsian (...)
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