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Forthcoming articles
  1. A. Albertsen & C. Knight (forthcoming). A Framework for Luck Egalitarianism in Health and Healthcare. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Several attempts have been made to apply the choice-sensitive theory of distributive justice, luck egalitarianism, in the context of health and healthcare. This article presents a framework for this discussion by highlighting different normative decisions to be made in such an application, some of the objections to which luck egalitarians must provide answers and some of the practical implications associated with applying such an approach in the real world. It is argued that luck egalitarians should address distributions of health rather (...)
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  2. Stephan Blatti (forthcoming). Mortal Harm and the Antemortem Experience of Death. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    In his recent book, Death, Posthumous Harm, and Bioethics (Routeledge 2012), James Stacey Taylor challenges two ideas whose provenance may be traced all the way back to Aristotle. The first of these is the thought that death (typically) harms the one who dies (mortal harm thesis). The second is the idea that one can be harmed (and wronged) by events that occur after one’s death (posthumous harm thesis). Taylor devotes two-thirds of his recent book to arguing against both theses and (...)
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  3. J. S. Blumenthal-Barby (forthcoming). Psychiatry’s New Manual (DSM-5): Ethical and Conceptual Dimensions. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    The introduction of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5) in May 2013 is being hailed as the biggest event in psychiatry in the last 10 years. In this paper I examine three important issues that arise from the new manual: (1) Expanding nosology: Psychiatry has again broadened its nosology to include human experiences not previously under its purview (eg, binge eating disorder, internet gaming disorder, caffeine use disorder, hoarding disorder, premenstrual dysphoric disorder). Consequencebased ethical concerns about this (...)
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  4. S. Bok (forthcoming). Trust but Verify. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101207.
  5. Danielle Bromwich (forthcoming). Understanding, Interests and Informed Consent: A Reply to Sreenivasan. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    It is widely agreed that the view of informed consent found in the regulations and guidelines struggles to keep pace with the ever-advancing enterprise of human subjects research. Over the last 10 years, there have been serious attempts to rethink informed consent so that it conforms to our considered judgments about cases where we are confident valid consent has been given. These arguments are influenced by an argument from Gopal Sreenivasan, which apparently shows that a potential participant's consent to research (...)
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  6. Jacob Busch & Rafaele Rodogno (forthcoming). A New Perspective on Shaw’s New Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  7. A. L. Caplan (forthcoming). Why Autonomy Needs Help. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100492.
    Some argue that to be effective in healthcare settings autonomy needs to be strengthened. The author thinks autonomy is fundamentally inadequate in healthcare settings and requires supplementation by experience-based paternalism on the part of doctors and healthcare providers.
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  8. N. Eyal (forthcoming). Using Informed Consent to Save Trust. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100490.
    Increasingly, bioethicists defend informed consent as a safeguard for trust in caretakers and medical institutions. This paper discusses an ‘ideal type’ of that move. What I call the trust-promotion argument for informed consent states: 1. Social trust, especially trust in caretakers and medical institutions, is necessary so that, for example, people seek medical advice, comply with it, and participate in medical research. 2. Therefore, it is usually wrong to jeopardise that trust.3. Coercion, deception, manipulation and other violations of standard informed (...)
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  9. N. Levy (forthcoming). Forced to Be Free? Increasing Patient Autonomy by Constraining It. Journal of Medical Ethics:2011-100207.
    It is universally accepted in bioethics that doctors and other medical professionals have an obligation to procure the informed consent of their patients. Informed consent is required because patients have the moral right to autonomy in furthering the pursuit of their most important goals. In the present work, it is argued that evidence from psychology shows that human beings are subject to a number of biases and limitations as reasoners, which can be expected to lower the quality of their decisions (...)
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  10. J. K. Margetts (forthcoming). Learning the Law: Practical Proposals for UK Medical Education. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101013.
    Ongoing serious breaches in medical professionalism can only be avoided if UK doctors rethink their approach to law. UK medical education has a role in creating a climate of change by re-examining how law is taught to medical students. Adopting a more insightful approach in the UK to the impact of The Human Rights Act and learning to manipulate legal concepts, such as conflict of interest, need to be taught to medical students now if UK doctors are to manage complex (...)
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  11. Timothy F. Murphy (forthcoming). The Meaning of Synthetic Gametes for Gay and Lesbian People and Bioethics Too. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  12. C. Palacios-González, J. Harris & G. Testa (forthcoming). Multiplex Parenting: IVG and the Generations to Come. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell differentiation and reprogramming suggest that functional human gametes could soon be created in vitro. While the ethical debate on the uses of in vitro generated gametes (IVG) was originally constrained by the fact that they could be derived only from embryonic stem cell lines, the advent of somatic cell reprogramming, with the possibility to easily derive human induced pluripotent stem cells from any individual, affords now a major leap in the feasibility of IVG derivation and (...)
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  13. Joshua Shepherd (forthcoming). Minimizing Harm Via Psychological Intervention: Response to Glannon. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    In a recent discussion, Walter Glannon discusses a number of ways we might try to minimize harm to patients who experience intraoperative awareness. In this response I direct attention to a possibility that deserves further attention. It might be that a kind of psychological intervention – namely, informing patients of the possibility of intraoperative awareness and of what to expect in such a case – would constitute a unique way to respect patient autonomy, as well as minimize the harm that (...)
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  14. T. Tannsjo (forthcoming). Utilitarianism and Informed Consent. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101206.
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  15. J. D. Trout (forthcoming). Forced to Be Right. Journal of Medical Ethics:2011-100426.
    In “Forced to be Free”, Neil Levy surveys the raft of documented decision-making biases that humans are heir to, and advances several bold proposals designed to enhance the patient's judgment. Gratefully, Levy is moved by the psychological research on judgment and decision-making that documents people's inaccuracy when identifying courses of action will best promote their subjective well-being. But Levy is quick to favour the patient's present preferences, to ensure they get “final say” about their treatment. I urge the opposite inclination, (...)
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  16. Alex Voorhoeve (forthcoming). Why Sore Throats Don't Aggregate, but Arms Do. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    When do claims to be saved of a small or moderate harm aggregate against a competing claim to be saved from an early death? In this short response to Kamm's Bioethical Prescriptions, I argue for the following answer: aggregation of weaker claims against a life is permitted just in case, in a one-to-one contest, a person with a weaker claim would have a personal prerogative to prioritize her claim over a stranger’s competing claim to life.
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  17. Tomasz Zuradzki (forthcoming). Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Rational Choice Under Risk or Uncertainty. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    In this paper I present an argument in favour of a parental duty to use preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). I argue that if embryos created in vitro were able to decide for themselves in a rational manner, they would sometimes choose PGD as a method of selection. Couples, therefore, should respect their hypothetical choices on a principle similar to that of patient autonomy. My thesis shows that no matter which moral doctrine couples subscribe to, they ought to conduct the PGD (...)
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  18. N. Agar (forthcoming). Moral Bioenhancement is Dangerous. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  19. T. L. Beauchamp (forthcoming). Are We Unfit for the Future? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  20. D. Benatar (forthcoming). Procreative Permissiveness. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  21. N. Biggar (forthcoming). Why Religion Deserves a Place in Secular Medicine. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  22. R. Bingham & N. Banner (forthcoming). The Definition of Mental Disorder: Evolving but Dysfunctional? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  23. X. Bosch (forthcoming). Improving Biomedical Journals' Ethical Policies: The Case of Research Misconduct. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  24. F. Callard (forthcoming). Psychiatric Diagnosis: The Indispensability of Ambivalence. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  25. B. Capps & Z. Lederman (forthcoming). One Health and Paradigms of Public Biobanking. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  26. P. Casal (forthcoming). On Not Taking Men as They Are: Reflections on Moral Bioenhancement. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  27. K. Chambaere, I. Loodts, L. Deliens & J. Cohen (forthcoming). Forgoing Artificial Nutrition or Hydration at the End of Life: A Large Cross-Sectional Survey in Belgium. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  28. S. Conly (forthcoming). Against Autonomy: Response to Critics. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  29. B. C. Corcoran, L. Brandt, D. A. Fleming & C. N. Gu (forthcoming). Fidelity to the Healing Relationship: A Medical Student's Challenge to Contemporary Bioethics and Prescription for Medical Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  30. R. Crisp (forthcoming). The Duty to Do the Best for One's Patient. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  31. A. Davidson (forthcoming). Fiddling with Memory. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  32. L. de Crespigny & J. Savulescu (forthcoming). Homebirth and the Future Child. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  33. J. Deyaert, K. Chambaere, J. Cohen, M. Roelands & L. Deliens (forthcoming). Labelling of End-of-Life Decisions by Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  34. C. T. Di Iorio, F. Carinci & J. Oderkirk (forthcoming). Health Research and Systems' Governance Are at Risk: Should the Right to Data Protection Override Health? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  35. A. Dowie (forthcoming). Making Sense of Assessment in Medical Ethics and Law. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  36. K. Dunphy (forthcoming). Herpes Genitalis and the Philosopher's Stance. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  37. G. Dworkin (forthcoming). Against Autonomy Response. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  38. M. -C. Fortin & B. Williams-Jones (forthcoming). Should We Perform Kidney Transplants on Foreign Nationals? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  39. C. Foster, J. Herring & M. Boyd (forthcoming). Testing the Limits of the 'Joint Account' Model of Genetic Information: A Legal Thought Experiment. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  40. L. Francis (forthcoming). Creation Ethics and the Harms of Existence. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  41. R. Francis (forthcoming). Culture, Compassion and Clinical Neglect--Probity in the NHS After Mid Staffordshire. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  42. W. Glannon (forthcoming). Taylor on Posthumous Organ Procurement. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  43. W. Glannon (forthcoming). Anaesthesia, Amnesia and Harm. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  44. G. M. T. Guilcher, C. V. Fernandez & S. Joffe (forthcoming). Are Hybrid Umbilical Cord Blood Banks Really the Best of Both Worlds? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  45. N. Hallowell, A. Hall, C. Alberg & R. Zimmern (forthcoming). Revealing the Results of Whole-Genome Sequencing and Whole-Exome Sequencing in Research and Clinical Investigations: Some Ethical Issues. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  46. T. D. Harter (forthcoming). Toward Accommodating Physicians' Conscientious Objections: An Argument for Public Disclosure. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  47. M. Hauskeller (forthcoming). Being Good Enough to Prevent the Worst. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  48. A. L. Hebron & S. McGee (forthcoming). Precedent Autonomy Should Be Respected in Life-Sustaining Treatment Decisions. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  49. D. B. Hershenov & R. J. Hershenov (forthcoming). Morally Relevant Potential. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  50. S. Honeybul, G. R. Gillett, K. M. Ho, C. Janzen & K. Kruger (forthcoming). Long-Term Survival with Unfavourable Outcome: A Qualitative and Ethical Analysis. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  51. D. Jensen (forthcoming). Birth, Meaningful Viability and Abortion. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  52. M. Jonas, A. Kolbe & B. Warin (forthcoming). Publish or Be Damned: Individual Funding Requests and the Publicity Condition. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  53. B. Jones, J. Howick, J. Hopewell & S. M. Liew (forthcoming). Response to 'Position Statement on Ethics, Equipoise and Research on Charged Particle Therapy'. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  54. F. Kamm (forthcoming). Summary of Bioethical Prescriptions. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  55. F. Kaufman (forthcoming). Comments on Death, Posthumous Harm and Bioethics. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  56. C. Kitzinger & J. Kitzinger (forthcoming). Withdrawing Artificial Nutrition and Hydration From Minimally Conscious and Vegetative Patients: Family Perspectives. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  57. E. Kleiderman, B. M. Knoppers, C. V. Fernandez, K. M. Boycott, G. Ouellette, D. Wong-Rieger, S. Adam, J. Richer & D. Avard (forthcoming). Returning Incidental Findings From Genetic Research to Children: Views of Parents of Children Affected by Rare Diseases. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  58. A. J. Kolber (forthcoming). The Limited Right to Alter Memory. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  59. N. Levy (forthcoming). The Harm of Intraoperative Awareness. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  60. W. Lipworth, I. Kerridge, B. Morrell, R. Forsyth & C. F. C. Jordens (forthcoming). Views of Health Journalists, Industry Employees and News Consumers About Disclosure and Regulation of Industry-Journalist Relationships: An Empirical Ethical Study. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  61. P. Louhiala, H. Hemila & R. Puustinen (forthcoming). Clinical Use of Placebo Treatments May Undermine the Trust of Patients: A Response to Gold and Lichtenberg. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  62. R. Lynch (forthcoming). Getting Back to Basics: On the Need to Define Care in Analyses of Care. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  63. J. S. Mellor, S. -A. Hulton & H. Draper (forthcoming). Adherence in Paediatric Renal Failure and Dialysis: An Ethical Analysis of Nurses' Attitudes and Reported Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  64. M. A. Mizani & N. Baykal (forthcoming). Policymaking to Preserve Privacy in Disclosure of Public Health Data: A Suggested Framework. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  65. C. Palacios-Gonzalez & D. R. Lawrence (forthcoming). Substance Over Style: Is There Something Wrong with Abandoning the White Coat? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  66. S. Pearce (forthcoming). DSM-5 and the Rise of the Diagnostic Checklist. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  67. I. Persson (forthcoming). What Makes Death Bad for Us? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  68. I. Persson & J. Savulescu (forthcoming). Reply to Commentators on Unfit for the Future. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  69. M. D. Pickersgill (forthcoming). Debating DSM-5: Diagnosis and the Sociology of Critique. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  70. M. Y. Rady & J. L. Verheijde (forthcoming). Liverpool Care Pathway: Life-Ending Pathway or Palliative Care Pathway? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  71. N. J. H. Raijmakers, A. van der Heide, P. S. C. Kouwenhoven, G. J. M. W. van Thiel, J. J. M. van Delden & J. A. C. Rietjens (forthcoming). Assistance in Dying for Older People Without a Serious Medical Condition Who Have a Wish to Die: A National Cross-Sectional Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  72. A. Rajczi (forthcoming). Wait Times and National Health Policy. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  73. B. Saunders (forthcoming). Is Procreative Beneficence Obligatory? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  74. M. K. Schoonman, G. J. M. W. van Thiel & J. J. M. van Delden (forthcoming). Non-Physician-Assisted Suicide in The Netherlands: A Cross-Sectional Survey Among the General Public. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  75. Y. C. Shetty & A. A. Saiyed (forthcoming). Analysis of Warning Letters Issued by the US Food and Drug Administration to Clinical Investigators, Institutional Review Boards and Sponsors: A Retrospective Study. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  76. A. Smajdor & D. Cutas (forthcoming). Artificial Gametes and the Ethics of Unwitting Parenthood. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  77. R. Sparrow (forthcoming). Reproductive Technologies, Risk, Enhancement and the Value of Genetic Relatedness. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  78. M. Spriggs & L. Gillam (forthcoming). Deception of Children in Research. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  79. C. Stanton (forthcoming). Maternal Transmission of HIV Infection: A Crime Against My Child? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  80. J. Tannenbaum (forthcoming). Philosophising Outside of the Academy. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  81. S. van der Dam, B. Molewijk, G. A. M. Widdershoven & T. A. Abma (forthcoming). Ethics Support in Institutional Elderly Care: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  82. E. Vayena (forthcoming). Direct-to-Consumer Genomics on the Scales of Autonomy. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  83. A. Voorhoeve (forthcoming). Why Sore Throats Don't Aggregate Against a Life, but Arms Do. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  84. H. Watt (forthcoming). Ancestor Embryos: Embryonic Gametes and Genetic Parenthood. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  85. A. Wertheimer (forthcoming). Against Autonomy? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  86. T. M. Wilkinson (forthcoming). Taylor on Presumed Consent. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  87. W. J. Winslade (forthcoming). Surgical Castration, Texas Law and the Case of Mr T. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  88. B. P. Wispelwey, A. Z. Zivotofsky & A. B. Jotkowitz (forthcoming). The Transplantation of Solid Organs From HIV-Positive Donors to HIV-Negative Recipients: Ethical Implications. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  89. A. Wrigley (forthcoming). Ethics and End of Life Care: The Liverpool Care Pathway and the Neuberger Review. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  90. V. Xafis, D. Wilkinson, L. Gillam & J. Sullivan (forthcoming). Balancing Obligations: Should Written Information About Life-Sustaining Treatment Be Neutral? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  91. Waleed Al-Herz, Hani Haider, Mahmoud Al-Bahhar & Adnan Sadeq (forthcoming). Honorary Authorship in Biomedical Journals: How Common is It and Why Does It Exist? Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101311.
    Background The number of coauthors in the medical literature has increased over the past 50 years as authorship continues to have important academic, social and financial implications. Aim and method The study aim was to determine the prevalence of honorary authorship in biomedical publications and identify the factors that lead to its existence. An email with a survey link was sent anonymously to 9283 corresponding authors of PubMed articles published within 1 year of contact. Results A completed survey was obtained (...)
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  92. Andreas Albertsen (forthcoming). Feiring's Concept of Forward-Looking Responsibility: A Dead End for Responsibility in Healthcare. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  93. Cosby G. Arnold (forthcoming). Two Faces of Patient Advocacy: The Current Controversy in Newborn Screening. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101019.
    Newborn screening programmes began in the 1960s, have traditionally been conducted without parental permission and have grown dramatically in the last decade. Whether these programmes serve patients’ best interests has recently become a point of controversy. Privacy advocates, concerned that newborn screening infringes upon individual liberties, are demanding fundamental changes to these programmes. These include parental permission and limiting the research on the blood samples obtained, an agenda at odds with the viewpoints of newborn screening advocates. This essay presents the (...)
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  94. Atsushi Asai (forthcoming). Tsunami-Tendenko and Morality in Disasters. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101629.
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  95. Eva C. A. Asscher & Maartje Schermer (forthcoming). Wish-Fulfilling Medicine in Practice: The Opinions and Arguments of Lay People. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101480.
    Background Wish-fulfilling medicine appears to be on the rise. It can be defined as ‘doctors and other health professionals using medical means (medical technology, drugs, and so on) in a medical setting to fulfil the explicitly stated, prima facie non-medical wish of a patient’. Some instances of wish fulfilling medicine can be understood as ‘human enhancements’. Aim The aim of this study is to map the normative opinions and arguments of lay people about wish-fulfilling medicine. Methods We conducted a qualitative (...)
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  96. Joan Box Bayes (forthcoming). What Are the Attitudes of Strictly-Orthodox Jews to Clinical Trials: Are They Influenced by Jewish Teachings? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  97. Ide Beaufort & F. Meulenberg (forthcoming). Eyewitness in Erewhon Academic Hospital: Part 6: Heart of Eloquent Darkness. Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  98. Leanne Bell & Sarah Devaney (forthcoming). Editorial: Gaps and Overlaps: Improving the Current Regulation of Stem in the UK. Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  99. S. R. Benatar (forthcoming). Commentary: Blinkered Bioethics. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  100. Paul Biegler & Marilyn Johnson (forthcoming). In Defence of Mandatory Bicycle Helmet Legislation: Response to Hooper and Spicer. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101476.
    We invoke a triple rationale to rebut Hooper and Spicer's argument against mandatory helmet laws. First, we use the laws of physics and empirical studies to show how bicycle helmets afford substantial protection to the user. We show that Hooper and Spicer erroneously downplay helmet utility and that, as a result, their attack on the utilitarian argument for mandatory helmet laws is weakened. Next, we refute their claim that helmet legislation comprises unjustified paternalism. We show the healthcare costs of bareheaded (...)
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  101. Nikola Biller-Andorno (forthcoming). Editorial: The Bioethics Biz. Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  102. Nikola Biller-Andorno (forthcoming). Editorial: It's Cloning Again! Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  103. Iain Brassington (forthcoming). The Case for a Duty to Research: Not yet Proven. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101370.
    In this commentary on ‘Why Participating in (Certain) Scientific Research is a Moral Duty’, I take issue with a number of Stjernschantz Forsberg et al's claims. Though abiding by the terms of a contract might be obligatory, this won't show that those terms themselves indicate a duty—even allowing that there's a contract to begin with. Meanwhile, though we might have reasons to participate, not all reasons are moral reasons, and the paper does not establish that the reasons here are moral (...)
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  104. Margaret Brazier & David Archard (forthcoming). Editorial: Letting Babies Die. Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  105. Valérie Bridoux, Lilian Schwarz, Grégoire Moutel, Francis Michot, Christian Herve & Jean-Jacques Tuech (forthcoming). Reporting of Ethical Requirements in Phase III Surgical Trials. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101070.
    Background Disclosure of obtaining informed consent from patients (ICP) and research ethics committee (REC) approval in published reports is sometimes omitted. To date, no disclosure data are available on surgical research. Objective Our aim was to assess whether REC approval and ICP were documented in surgical trials. Study design Overall, 657 randomised trials, published between 2005 and 2010 in 10 international journals, were included. We collected the report rate of REC approval and ICP and contacted the corresponding author when ethical (...)
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  106. Sophie M. Bruinsma, Judith A. C. Rietjens, Siebe J. Swart, Roberto S. G. M. Perez, Johannes J. M. Van Delden & Agnes van der Heide (forthcoming). Estimating the Potential Life-Shortening Effect of Continuous Sedation Until Death: A Comparison Between Two Approaches. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101459.
    Context In some cases, physicians estimate that continuous sedation until death may have a life-shortening effect. The accuracy of these estimations can be questioned. Aim The aim of this study is to compare two approaches to estimate the potential life-shortening effect of continuous sedation until death. Methods In 2008, 370 Dutch physicians filled out a questionnaire and reported on their last patient who received continuous sedation until death. The potential life-shortening effect of continuous sedation was estimated through a direct approach (...)
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  107. Daniel Z. Buchman & Anita Ho (forthcoming). What's Trust Got to Do with It? Revisiting Opioid Contracts. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101320.
    Prescription opioid abuse (POA) is an escalating clinical and public health problem. Physician worries about iatrogenic addiction and whether patients are ‘drug seeking’, ‘abusing’ and ‘diverting’ prescription opioids exist against a backdrop of professional and legal consequences of prescribing that have created a climate of distrust in chronic pain management. One attempt to circumvent these worries is the use of opioid contracts that outline conditions patients must agree to in order to receive opioids. Opioid contracts have received some scholarly attention, (...)
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  108. T. Buller (forthcoming). Editorial: What Can Neuroscience Contribute to Ethics? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  109. Tracey E. Chan, Nicola S. Peart & Jacqueline Chin (forthcoming). Evolving Legal Responses to Dependence on Families in New Zealand and Singapore Healthcare. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101225.
    Healthcare decision-making has traditionally focused on individual autonomy, but there is now a change occurring in which the involvement of families is gaining prominence. This appears to stem from an increasing emphasis on relational aspects of autonomy which recognises the individual's connectedness to their family, and also state reliance upon families to share the burdens and costs of caring for elderly and disabled dependents. Such a reorientation calls for similar legal emphasis on patient autonomy as understood in relational terms, and (...)
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  110. Frank C. Chaten (forthcoming). The Dead Donor Rule: Effect on the Virtuous Practice of Medicine. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101333.
    Objective The President's Council on Bioethics in 2008 reaffirmed the necessity of the dead donor rule and the legitimacy of the current criteria for diagnosing both neurological and cardiac death. In spite of this report, many have continued to express concerns about the ethics of donation after circulatory death, the validity of determining death using neurological criteria and the necessity for maintaining the dead donor rule for organ donation. I analysed the dead donor rule for its effect on the virtuous (...)
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  111. Christy L. Cummings, Karen A. Diefenbach & Mark R. Mercurio (forthcoming). Counselling Variation Among Physicians Regarding Intestinal Transplant for Short Bowel Syndrome. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101269.
    Background Intestinal transplant in infants with severe short bowel syndrome (SBS) is an emerging therapy, yet without sufficient long-term data or established guidelines, resulting in possible variation in practice. Objectives To assess current attitudes and counselling practices among physicians regarding intestinal transplant in infants with SBS, and to determine whether counselling and management vary between subspecialists or centres. Methods A national sample of practicing paediatric surgeons and neonatologists was surveyed via the American Academy of Paediatrics listserves. Results were analysed by (...)
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  112. Flávio Guimarães da Fonseca, Daniel Mendes Ribeiro, Nara Pereira Carvalho & Brunello Stancioli (forthcoming). Human in Vitro Eugenics: Close, yet Far Away. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101674.
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  113. J. Dana (forthcoming). Harm Avoidance and Financial Conflict of Interest. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  114. Jasan Dannaway & Hans Peter Dietz (forthcoming). Unassisted Childbirth: Why Mothers Are Leaving the System. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101150.
    Unassisted childbirth is a topical subject that has sparked ethical and legal debate. Although there are little data surrounding unassisted birthing practice, concerns over consent, procedural intervention and loss of the birthing experience may be driving women away from formal healthcare. The healthcare system needs to work toward understanding this practice and, perhaps with the support of legislation, address the concerns of mothers in order to ensure optimal childbirth outcomes.
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  115. Dena S. Davis (forthcoming). Alzheimer Disease and Pre-Emptive Suicide. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101022.
    There is a flood of papers being published on new ways to diagnose Alzheimer disease (AD) before it is symptomatic, involving a combination of invasive tests (eg, spinal tap), and pen and paper tests. This changes the landscape with respect to genetic tests for risk of AD, making rational suicide a much more feasible option. Before the availability of these presymptomatic tests, even someone with a high risk of developing AD could not know if and when the disease was approaching. (...)
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  116. Robin Downie (forthcoming). Guest Editorial: Xenotransplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  117. Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). Personal Knowledge and Study Participation. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101390.
    Scientists in earlier times considered personal research participation an essential component of their work. Exposing themselves to untested interventions was seen as the most ethical way to gauge the human response to those interventions. The practice was also educational, for it generated useful information that helped researchers plan subsequent human studies. Self-experimentation was eventually replaced by more comprehensive ethical codes governing human research. But it is time to bring back the practice of self-experimentation, albeit in modified form. Through serving as (...)
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  118. Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). Pre-Emptive Suicide, Precedent Autonomy and Preclinical Alzheimer Disease. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101615.
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  119. Dan Egonsson (forthcoming). Review of Behavioral Genetics, Journal of Medical Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  120. Rahime Aydin Er, Mine Sehiralti, Paul Appelbaum, Ahmet Tamer Aker & Cigdem Caglayan (forthcoming). Comparing Assessments of the Decision-Making Competencies of Psychiatric Inpatients as Provided by Physicians, Nurses, Relatives and an Assessment Tool. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100928.
    Objective To compare assessments of the decision-making competencies of psychiatric inpatients as provided by physicians, nurses, relatives and an assessment tool. Methods This study was carried out at the psychiatry clinic of Kocaeli University Hospital from June 2007 to February 2008. The decision-making competence of the 83 patients who participated in the study was assessed by physicians, nurses, relatives and MacCAT-T. Results Of the 83 patients, the relatives of 73.8% of them, including the parents of 47.7%, were interviewed during the (...)
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  121. Nir Eyal (forthcoming). Informed Consent, the Value of Trust, and Hedons. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101208.
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  122. Nir Eyal (forthcoming). Paternalism, French Fries and the Weak-Willed Witness. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  123. Nicholas S. Fitz & Peter B. Reiner (forthcoming). The Challenge of Crafting Policy for Do-It-Yourself Brain Stimulation. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101458.
    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a simple means of brain stimulation, possesses a trifecta of appealing features: it is relatively safe, relatively inexpensive and relatively effective. It is also relatively easy to obtain a device and the do-it-yourself (DIY) community has become galvanised by reports that tDCS can be used as an all-purpose cognitive enhancer. We provide practical recommendations designed to guide balanced discourse, propagate norms of safe use and stimulate dialogue between the DIY community and regulatory authorities. We call (...)
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  124. James M. Fitzgerald, Katherine E. Krause, Darya Yermak, Suzanne Dunne, Ailish Hannigan, Walter Cullen, David Meagher, Deirdre McGrath, Paul Finucane, Calvin Coffey & Colum Dunne (forthcoming). The First Survey of Attitudes of Medical Students in Ireland Towards Termination of Pregnancy. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101608.
    Background Since the UK Abortion Act (1967), women have travelled from Ireland to the UK for legal abortion. In 2011 >4000 women did so. Knowledge and attitudes of medical students towards abortion have been published, however, this is the first such report from Ireland. Objective To investigate medical students’ attitudes towards abortion in Ireland. Methods All medical students at the University of Limerick, and physicians who graduated from the university within the previous 12 months, were invited via email to complete (...)
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  125. Joanna Stjernschantz Forsberg, Mats G. Hansson & Stefan Eriksson (forthcoming). Why Participating in (Certain) Scientific Research is a Moral Duty. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100859.
    Our starting point in this article is the debate between John Harris and Iain Brassington on whether or not there is a duty to take part in scientific research. We consider the arguments that have been put forward based on fairness and a duty to rescue, and suggest an alternative justification grounded in a hypothetical agreement: that is, because effective healthcare cannot be taken for granted, but requires continuous medical research, and nobody knows what kind of healthcare they will need, (...)
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  126. Charles Foster (forthcoming). Human Dignity in Bioethics and Law. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  127. Misao Fujita, Yoshimi Yashiro & Mika Suzuki (forthcoming). Throwing the Baby Out with the Bathwater:A Critique of Sparrow's Inclusive Definitionof the Term 'in Vitro Eugenics'. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101681.
    Sparrow highlights three potential applications of in vitro eugenics, that is, (a) research into the heredity of genetic disorders, (b) production of cell lines with specific genotypes, and (c) breeding better babies, and points to the need for researchers to discuss in advance the potential ethical problems that may emerge if the realization of this technology occurs in the near future. In this commentary, we pose a question for the sake of discussion. Is it, in fact, appropriate to label all (...)
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  128. Lynn Gillam, Clare Delany, Marilys Guillemin & Sally Warmington (forthcoming). The Role of Emotions in Health Professional Ethics Teaching. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101278.
    In this paper, we put forward the view that emotions have a legitimate and important role in health professional ethics education. This paper draws upon our experience of running a narrative ethics education programme for ethics educators from a range of healthcare disciplines. It describes the way in which emotions may be elicited in narrative ethics teaching and considers the appropriate role of emotions in ethics education for health professionals. We argue there is a need for a pedagogical framework to (...)
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  129. Raanan Gillon (forthcoming). Editorial:" Futility": Too Ambiguous and Pejorative a Term? Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  130. Raanan Gillon (forthcoming). Editorial: A Personal View: Philosophy and the Teaching of Health Care Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  131. Simona Giordano & Marco Cappato (forthcoming). Editorial: Scientific Freedom. Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  132. Michael Glass (forthcoming). Forced Circumcision of Men (Abridged). Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101626.
    The forced circumcision of men is a widespread human rights abuse that often accompanies other human rights violations. It occurs in clashes between circumcising and non-circumcising cultures, or when individuals in circumcising cultures reject circumcision. This article documents the forced circumcision of men against their will, shows how evidence of forced circumcision has been downplayed and discounted, and outlines and discusses some measures that could help to reduce its prevalence.
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  133. Daniel Halliday (forthcoming). The Ethics of a Smoking Licence. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  134. Mordechai Halperin (forthcoming). Post-Mortem Sperm Retrieval. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  135. Les Halpin, Julian Savulescu, Kevin Talbot, Martin Turner & Paul Talman (forthcoming). Improving Access to Medicines: Empowering Patients in the Quest to Improve Treatment for Rare Lethal Diseases. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101427.
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  136. R. M. Hare (forthcoming). Guest Editorial: Is Medical Ethics Lost? Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  137. Marcus A. Henning, Sanya Ram, Phillipa Malpas, Richard Sisley, Andrea Thompson & Susan J. Hawken (forthcoming). Reasons for Academic Honesty and Dishonesty with Solutions: A Study of Pharmacy and Medical Students in New Zealand. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101420.
    This paper presents students’ views about honest and dishonest actions within the pharmacy and medical learning environments. Students also offered their views on solutions to ameliorating dishonest action. Three research questions were posed in this paper: (1) what reasons would students articulate in reference to engaging in dishonest behaviours? (2) What reasons would students articulate in reference to maintaining high levels of integrity? (3) What strategies would students suggest to decrease engagement in dishonest behaviours and/or promote honest behaviours? The design (...)
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  138. Solène Gouilhers Hertig, Samuele Cavalli, Claudine Burton-Jeangros & Bernice S. Elger (forthcoming). 'Doctor, What Would You Do in My Position?' Health Professionals and the Decision-Making Process in Pregnancy Monitoring. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100887.
    Objective Routine prenatal screening for Down syndrome challenges professional non-directiveness and patient autonomy in daily clinical practices. This paper aims to describe how professionals negotiate their role when a pregnant woman asks them to become involved in the decision-making process implied by screening. Methods Forty-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with gynaecologists–obstetricians (n=26) and midwives (n=15) in a large Swiss city. Results Three professional profiles were constructed along a continuum that defines the relative distance or proximity towards patients’ demands for professional (...)
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  139. Roger Higgs (forthcoming). An Obstructed Death and Medical Ethics [with Commentary]. Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  140. Carwyn Rhys Hooper & John Spicer (forthcoming). Bike Helmets: A Reply to Replies. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101723.
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  141. Matthew C. Kiernan (forthcoming). Tragic Choices. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101652.
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  142. Satoshi Kodama (forthcoming). Tsunami-Tendenko and Morality in Disasters. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100813.
    Disaster planning challenges our morality. Everyday rules of action may need to be suspended during large-scale disasters in favour of maxims that that may make prudential or practical sense and may even be morally preferable but emotionally hard to accept, such as tsunami-tendenko. This maxim dictates that the individual not stay and help others but run and preserve his or her life instead. Tsunami-tendenko became well known after the great East Japan earthquake on 11 March 2011, when almost all the (...)
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  143. Lonzozou Kpanake, Kolou S. Dassa, Paul Clay Sorum & Etienne Mullet (forthcoming). Togolese Lay People's and Health Professionals' Views About the Acceptability of Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101424.
    AIM: To study the views on the acceptability of physician-assisted-suicide (PAS) of lay people and health professionals in an African country, Togo.\n\nMETHOD: In February-June 2012, 312 lay people and 198 health professionals (75 physicians, 60 nurses and 63 health counsellors) in Togo judged the acceptability of PAS in 36 concrete scenarios composed of all combinations of four factors: (a) the patient's age, (b) the level of incurability of the illness, (c) the type of suffering and (d) the patient's request for (...)
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  144. Timothy Mark Krahn (forthcoming). Care Ethics for Guiding the Process of Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis. Journal of Medical Ethics:2011-100063.
    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disorder for which there is no definitive diagnostic test. Uncertainty characterises most of its features with diagnosis reached through a process of elimination. Coping with uncertainty has been recognised as a significant problem for MS patients. Discussions in the literature concerning the ethics of MS diagnosis have focused on an ethics of duty emphasising the rules for disclosure and healthcare professionals’ obligations to provide information to patients. This narrow construal of the ethics at (...)
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  145. Ryan E. Lawrence (forthcoming). Conscientious Objection and its Social Context. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101672.
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  146. Zohar Lederman, Mirko Garasic & Michelle Piperberg (forthcoming). Family Presence During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Who Should Decide? Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100715.
    Whether to allow the presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been a highly contentious topic in recent years. Even though a great deal of evidence and professional guidelines support the option of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR), many healthcare professionals still oppose it. One of the main arguments espoused by the latter is that family members should not be allowed for the sake of the patient's best interests, whether it is to increase his chances of survival, respect (...)
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  147. Thomas Bøker Lund, Thorkild I. A. Sørensen, I. Anna S. Olsson, Axel Kornerup Hansen & Peter Sandøe (forthcoming). Is It Acceptable to Use Animals to Model Obese Humans? A Critical Discussion of Two Arguments Against the Use of Animals in Obesity Research. Journal of Medical Ethics:2011-100368.
    Animal use in medical research is widely accepted on the basis that it may help to save human lives and improve their quality of life. Recently, however, objections have been made specifically to the use of animals in scientific investigation of human obesity. This paper discusses two arguments for the view that this form of animal use, unlike some other forms of animal-based medical research, cannot be defended. The first argument leans heavily on the notion that people themselves are responsible (...)
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  148. Niels Lynøe (forthcoming). Physicians' Practices When Frustrating Patients' Needs: A Comparative Study of Restrictiveness in Offering Abortion and Sedation Therapy. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101194.
    In this paper it is argued that physicians’ restrictive attitudes in offering abortions during 1946–1965 in Sweden were due to their private values. The values, however, were rarely presented openly. Instead physicians’ values influenced their assessment of the facts presented—that is, the women's’ trustworthiness. In this manner the physicians were able to conceal their private values and impede the women from getting what they wanted and needed. The practice was concealed from both patients and physicians and never publicly discussed. It (...)
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  149. Morten Magelssen, Reidar Pedersen & Reidun Førde (forthcoming). Sources of Bias in Clinical Ethics Case Deliberation. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101604.
    A central task for clinical ethics consultants and committees (CEC) is providing analysis of, and advice on, prospective or retrospective clinical cases. However, several kinds of biases may threaten the integrity, relevance or quality of the CEC's deliberation. Bias should be identified and, if possible, reduced or counteracted. This paper provides a systematic classification of kinds of bias that may be present in a CEC's case deliberation. Six kinds of bias are discussed, with examples, as to their significance and risk (...)
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  150. Hannah Maslen, Tom Douglas, Roi Cohen Kadosh, Neil Levy & Julian Savulescu (forthcoming). Do-It-Yourself Brain Stimulation: A Regulatory Model. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101692.
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  151. Debra J. H. Mathews (forthcoming). Language Matters. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101808.
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  152. Daniel Lawrence Maughan & Alexis Economou (forthcoming). Social Networking Sites: A Clinical Dilemma? Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  153. Rosalind J. McDougall & Lauren Notini (forthcoming). Overriding Parents' Medical Decisions for Their Children: A Systematic Review of Normative Literature. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101446.
    This paper reviews the ethical literature on conflicts between health professionals and parents about medical decision-making for children. We present the results of a systematic review which addressed the question ‘when health professionals and parents disagree about the appropriate course of medical treatment for a child, under what circumstances is the health professional ethically justified in overriding the parents’ wishes?’ We identified nine different ethical frameworks that were put forward by their authors as applicable across various ages and clinical scenarios. (...)
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  154. Hugh V. McLachlan (forthcoming). On the Random Distribution of Scarce Doses of Vaccine in Response to the Threat of an Influenza Pandemic: A Response to Wardrope. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101516.
    Wardrope argues against my proposed non-consequentialist policy for the distribution of scarce influenza vaccine in the face of a pandemic. According to him, even if one accepts what he calls my deontological ethical theory, it does not follow that we are required to agree with my proposed randomised allocation of doses of vaccine by means of a lottery. He argues in particular that I fail to consider fully the prophylactic role of vaccination whereby it serves to protect from infection more (...)
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  155. John McMillan (forthcoming). The Kindest Cut? Surgical Castration, Sex Offenders and Coercive Offers. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101030.
    The European Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) have conducted visits and written reports criticising the surgical castration of sex offenders in the Czech Republic and Germany. They claim that surgical castration is degrading treatment and have called for an immediate end to this practice. The Czech and German governments have published rebuttals of these criticisms. The rebuttals cite evidence about clinical effectiveness and point out this is an intervention that must be (...)
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  156. Heidi Mertes (forthcoming). A Moratorium on Breeding Better Babies. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101560.
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  157. Barton Moffatt (forthcoming). Research Funding and Authorship: Does Grant Winning Count Towards Authorship Credit? Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101315.
    It is unclear whether or not grant winning should count towards authorship credit in the sciences. In this paper, I argue that under certain circumstances grant winning can count for credit as an author on subsequent works. It is a mistake to think that grant winning is always irrelevant to the correct attribution of authorship.
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  158. Brian J. Morris, Aaron A. R. Tobian, Catherine A. Hankins, Jeffrey D. Klausner, Joya Banerjee, Stefan A. Bailis, Stephen Moses & Thomas E. Wiswell (forthcoming). Veracity and Rhetoric in Paediatric Medicine: A Critique of Svoboda and Van Howe's Response to the AAP Policy on Infant Male Circumcision. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101614.
    In a recent issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics, Svoboda and Van Howe commented on the 2012 change in the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy on newborn male circumcision, in which the AAP stated that benefits of the procedure outweigh the risks. Svoboda and Van Howe disagree with the AAP conclusions. We show here that their arguments against male circumcision are based on a poor understanding of epidemiology, erroneous interpretation of the evidence, selective citation of the literature, statistical (...)
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  159. Timothy F. Murphy (forthcoming). Genetic Generations: Artificial Gametes and the Embryos Produced with Them. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101646.
    Certain interventions now permit the derivation of mammalian gametes from stem cells cultivated from either somatic cells or embryos. These gametes can be used in an indefinite cycle of conception in vitro, gamete derivation, conception in vitro, and so on, producing genetic generations that live only in vitro. One commentator has described this prospect for human beings as eugenics, insofar as it would allow for the selection and development of certain traits in human beings. This commentary not only offers this (...)
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  160. Yassar Mustafa (forthcoming). Islam and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101309.
    The principles underpinning Islam's ethical framework applied to routine clinical scenarios remain insufficiently understood by many clinicians, thereby unfortunately permitting the delivery of culturally insensitive healthcare. This paper summarises the foundations of the Islamic ethical theory, elucidating the principles and methodology employed by the Muslim jurist in deriving rulings in the field of medical ethics. The four-principles approach, as espoused by Beauchamp and Childress, is also interpreted through the prism of Islamic ethical theory. Each of the four principles (beneficence, non-maleficence, (...)
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  161. Patrick Nairne (forthcoming). Guest Editorial: Demystifying Bioethics: A Lay Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  162. Jan Narveson (forthcoming). Comment on Levy's 'Forced to Be Free? Increasing Patient Autonomy by Constraining It'. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  163. Christopher Newdick & Christopher Danbury (forthcoming). Culture, Compassion and Clinical Neglect: Probity in the NHS After Mid Staffordshire. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101048.
    Speaking of the public response to the deaths of children at the Bristol Royal Infirmary before 2001, the BMJ commented that the NHS would be ‘all changed, changed utterly’. Today, two inquiries into the Mid Staffordshire Foundation Trust suggest nothing changed at all. Many patients died as a result of their care and the stories of indifference and neglect there are harrowing. Yet Bristol and Mid Staffordshire are not isolated reports. In 2011, the Health Services Ombudsman reported on the care (...)
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  164. Sven Jakob Nordstrand, Magnus Andreas Nordstrand, Per Nortvedt & Morten Magelssen (forthcoming). Medical Students' Attitudes Towards Conscientious Objection: A Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101482.
    Objective To examine medical students’ views on conscientious objection and controversial medical procedures. Methods Questionnaire study among Norwegian 5th and 6th year medical students. Results Five hundred and thirty-one of 893 students (59%) responded. Respondents object to a range of procedures not limited to abortion (up to 19%)—notably euthanasia (62%), ritual circumcision for boys (52%), assisted reproduction for same-sex couples (9.7%) and ultrasound in the setting of prenatal diagnosis (5.0%). A small minority (4.9%) would object to referrals for abortion. In (...)
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  165. Justin Oakley (forthcoming). Can Self-Preservation Be Virtuous in Disaster Situations? Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101631.
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  166. Jens Olde-Rikkert (forthcoming). Experienced Consent and Clinical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  167. Christopher Oldroyd & Lydie Fialova (forthcoming). Ethics Teaching on 'Beginning of Life'issues in UK Medical Schools. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  168. Gert Olthuis, Carlo Leget & Mieke Grypdonck (forthcoming). Why Shared Decision Making is Not Good Enough: Lessons From Patients. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101215.
    A closer look at the lived illness experiences of medical professionals themselves shows that shared decision making is in need of a logic of care. This paper underlines that medical decision making inevitably takes place in a messy and uncertain context in which sharing responsibilities may impose a considerable burden on patients. A better understanding of patients’ lived experiences enables healthcare professionals to attune to what individual patients deem important in their lives. This will contribute to making medical decisions in (...)
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  169. John J. Park & Scott A. Murray (forthcoming). Should Doctors Strike? Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101397.
    Last year in June, British doctors went on strike for the first time since 1975. Amidst a global economic downturn and with many health systems struggling with reduced finances, around the world the issue of public health workers going on strike is a very real one. Almost all doctors will agree that we should always follow the law, but often the law is unclear or does not cover a particular case. Here we must appeal to ethical discussion. The General Medical (...)
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  170. Ingmar Persson & Julian Savulescu (forthcoming). Summary of Unfit for the Future. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  171. Vilma Pinchi, Gian-Aristide Norelli & Viola Bartolini (forthcoming). Ethical Implications of Italian Legislation on 'Epilepsy and Driving'. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100863.
    The laws concerning driving licences and epilepsy in different countries are very diverse with regard to the criteria for issuance or renewal of licences, and also the methods of evaluating fitness. In 2011, a law was issued in Italy implementing the European directives on driving licences, including provisions for mandatory notification that a driver is epileptic. This was established regardless of the European rules that require compulsory notification only of patients. The Federation of Italian Boards of Physicians has made recommendations (...)
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  172. Ioannis Poulis (forthcoming). Editorial: Bioethics and Physiotherapy. Journal of Medical Ethics.
     
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  173. Jonathan Pugh (forthcoming). Concerns About Eroding the Ethical Barrier to in Vitro Eugenics: Lessons From the hESC Debate. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101660.
    In his discussion of in vitrogametogenesis, Rob Sparrow claims that an ethical barrier to development of this technology is that many jurisdictions currently prohibit the practice of creating embryos solely for the purpose of research. However, he suggests that this ethical barrier will soon be eroded, in view of the fact that in vitro gametogenesis could serve as a powerful new technology to overcome infertility. In this commentary, I argue that Sparrow is being overly optimistic in his analysis here. I (...)
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  174. Jonathan Pugh (forthcoming). Coercive Paternalism and Back-Door Perfectionism. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  175. Katrin Radenbach, Peter Falkai, Traudel Weber-Reich & Alfred Simon (forthcoming). Joint Crisis Plans and Psychiatric Advance Directives in German Psychiatric Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101038.
    This study explores the attitude of German psychiatrists in leading positions towards joint crisis plans and psychiatric advance directives. This topic was examined by contacting 473 medical directors of German psychiatric hospitals and departments. They were asked to complete a questionnaire developed by us. That form contained questions about the incidence and acceptance of joint crisis plans and psychiatric advance directives and previous experiences with them. 108 medical directors of psychiatric hospitals and departments responded (response rate: 22.8%). Their answers demonstrate (...)
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  176. David B. Resnik & Efthimios Parasidis (forthcoming). Waiving Legal Rights in Research. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101547.
    The US federal research regulations prohibit informed consent, whether written or oral, from including provisions in which human subjects waive or appear to waive legal rights. We argue that policies that prevent human subjects from waiving legal rights in research can be ethically justified under the rationale of group, soft paternalism. These policies protect competent adults from making adverse decisions about health and legal matters that they may not understand fully. However, this rationale is less defensible if there is a (...)
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  177. Jesper Ryberg & Thomas S. Petersen (forthcoming). Surgical Castration, Coercion and Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101508.
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  178. Sabine Salloch, Jochen Vollmann & Jan Schildmann (forthcoming). Ethics by Opinion Poll? The Functions of Attitudes Research for Normative Deliberations in Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101253.
    Empirical studies on people's moral attitudes regarding ethically challenging topics contribute greatly to research in medical ethics. However, it is not always clear in which ways this research adds to medical ethics as a normative discipline. In this article, we aim to provide a systematic account of the different ways in which attitudinal research can be used for normative reflection. In the first part, we discuss whether ethical judgements can be based on empirical work alone and we develop a sceptical (...)
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  179. John Saunders (forthcoming). Good People Do Bad Things. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101460.
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  180. Udo Schuklenk (forthcoming). And There We Go Again: The Ethics of Placebo-Controlled RCT in Case of Catastrophic Illness. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101653.
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  181. Hannah Selinger (forthcoming). Maternal Request for Caesarean Section: An Ethical Consideration. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101558.
    Caesarean section (CS) is a method of delivering a baby through a surgical incision into the abdominal wall. Until recently in the UK, it was preserved as a procedure which was only carried out in certain circumstances. These included if the fetus lay in a breech position or was showing signs of distress leading to a requirement for rapid delivery. CS is perceived as a safe method of delivery due to the recommendation by the National Institute for Health and Care (...)
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  182. Elizabeth Shaw (forthcoming). Offering Castration to Sex Offenders: The Significance of the State's Intentions. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101506.
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  183. Mark Sheehan, Claire Timlin, Ken Peach, Ariella Binik, Wilson Puthenparampil, Mark Lodge, Sean Kehoe, Michael Brada, Neil Burnet, Steve Clarke, Adrian Crellin, Michael Dunn, Piero Fossati, Steve Harris, Michael Hocken, Tony Hope, Jonathan Ives, Tadashi Kamada, Alex John London, Robert Miller, Michael Parker, Madelon Pijls-Johannesma, Julian Savulescu, Susan Short, Loane Skene, Hirohiko Tsujii, Jeffrey Tuan & Charles Weijer (forthcoming). Position Statement on Ethics, Equipoise and Research on Charged Particle Radiation Therapy. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101290.
    The use of charged-particle radiation therapy (CPRT) is an increasingly important development in the treatment of cancer. One of the most pressing controversies about the use of this technology is whether randomised controlled trials are required before this form of treatment can be considered to be the treatment of choice for a wide range of indications. Equipoise is the key ethical concept in determining which research studies are justified. However, there is a good deal of disagreement about how this concept (...)
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  184. Andrew W. Siegel (forthcoming). Some Doubts About in Vitro Eugenics as a Human Enhancement Technology. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101511.
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  185. Judith A. Smith (forthcoming). The Francis Inquiry: From Diagnosis to Treatment. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  186. Richard Smith (forthcoming). Guest Editorial: The Ethics of Ignorance. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  187. Robert Sparrow (forthcoming). In Vitro Eugenics. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101200.
    A series of recent scientific results suggest that, in the not-too-distant future, it will be possible to create viable human gametes from human stem cells. This paper discusses the potential of this technology to make possible what I call ‘in vitro eugenics’: the deliberate breeding of human beings in vitro by fusing sperm and egg derived from different stem-cell lines to create an embryo and then deriving new gametes from stem cells derived from that embryo. Repeated iterations of this process (...)
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  188. I. Stegeman, D. L. Willems, E. Dekker & P. M. Bossuyt (forthcoming). Individual Responsibility, Solidarity and Differentiation in Healthcare. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101388.
    Objectives Access to healthcare in most western societies is based on equality. Rapidly rising costs have fuelled debates about differentiation in access to healthcare. We assessed the public's perceptions and attitudes about differentiation in healthcare according to lifestyle behaviour. Methods A vignette study was undertaken in participants in a colorectal cancer screening pilot programme in the Netherlands. Screenees with a negative test result received a questionnaire in which nine hypothetical situations were described: three different healthcare settings (screening, lung cancer, chronic (...)
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  189. Yi-Chen Su (forthcoming). When Ethical Reform Became Law: The Constitutional Concerns Raised by Recent Legislation in Taiwan. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101599.
    In an effort at ethical reform, Taiwan recently revised the Hospice Palliative Care Law authorising family members or physicians to make surrogate decisions to discontinue life-sustaining treatment if an incompetent terminally ill patient did not express their wishes while still competent. In particular, Article 7 of the new law authorises the palliative care team, namely the physicians, to act as sole decision-makers on behalf of the incompetent terminally ill patient's best interests if no family member is available. However, the law (...)
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  190. George Szmukler (forthcoming). When Psychiatric Diagnosis Becomes an Overworked Tool. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101761.
    A psychiatric diagnosis today is asked to serve many functions—clinical, research, medicolegal, delimiting insurance coverage, service planning, defining eligibility for state benefits (eg, for unemployment or disability), as well as providing rallying points for pressure groups and charities. These contexts require different notions of diagnosis to tackle the particular problem such a designation is meant to solve. In a number of instances, a ‘status’ definition (ie, a diagnostic label or category) is employed to tackle what is more appropriately seen as (...)
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  191. Allyson Thomson, Peter Roberts & Alan Bittles (forthcoming). Navigating the Maze: Ethics Approval Pathways for Intellectual Disability Research. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-100899.
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  192. Paul Trégouët (forthcoming). Helmets or Not? Use Science Correctly. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101521.
    In a recent article, Hooper and Spicer make several arguments against legislation that would mandate the use of bicycle helmets. While they present reasonable objections to the utilitarian as well as the justice defence of such legislation, their review of the empirical evidence contains inaccuracies, omissions and a bias in the selection of empirical data. While there are legitimate reasons to argue against mandating helmet legislation, these arguments should still be based on clinically and scientifically sound evidence.
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  193. Takako Tsujimura-Ito, Yusuke Inoue & Ken-Ichi Yoshida (forthcoming). Organ Retention and Communication of Research Use Following Medico-Legal Autopsy: A Pilot Survey of University Forensic Medicine Departments in Japan. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101151.
    This study investigated the circumstances and problems that departments of forensic medicine encounter with bereaved families regarding samples obtained from medico-legal autopsies. A questionnaire was posted to all 76 departments of forensic medicine performing medico-legal autopsies in Japan, and responses were received from 48 (63.2%). Of the respondents, 12.8% had approached and communicated with bereaved families about collecting samples from the deceased person during an autopsy and the storage of the samples. In addition, 23.4% of these had informed families that (...)
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  194. Eliyahu Ungar-Sargon (forthcoming). On the Impermissibility of Infant Male Circumcision: A Response to Mazor (2013). Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101598.
    This is a response to Dr Joseph Mazor’s paper ‘The child's interests and the case for the permissibility of male infant circumcision.’ I argue that Dr Mazor fails to prove that bodily integrity and self-determination are mere interests as opposed to genuine rights in the case of infant male circumcision. Moreover, I cast doubt on the interest calculus that Dr Mazor employs to arrive at his conclusions about circumcision.
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  195. Emanuele Valenti, Domenico Giacco, Christina Katasakou & Stefan Priebe (forthcoming). Which Values Are Important for Patients During Involuntary Treatment? A Qualitative Study with Psychiatric Inpatients. Journal of Medical Ethics:2011-100370.
    Involuntary hospital treatment is practised throughout the world. Providing appropriate treatment in this context is particularly challenging for mental health professionals, who frequently face ethical issues as they have to administer treatments in the absence of patient consent. We have explored the views of 59 psychiatric patients who had been involuntarily admitted to hospital treatment across England. Moral deliberation theory, developed in the field of clinical bioethics, was used to assess ethical issues. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and (...)
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  196. Alistair Wardrope (forthcoming). Authenticity and Autonomy in Deep-Brain Stimulation. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101419.
    Felicitas Kraemer draws on the experiences of patients undergoing deep-brain stimulation (DBS) to propose two distinct and potentially conflicting principles of respect: for an individual's autonomy (interpreted as mental competence), and for their authenticity. I argue instead that, according to commonly-invoked justifications of respect for autonomy, authenticity is itself in part constitutive of an analysis of autonomy worthy of respect; Kraemer's argument thus highlights the shortcomings of practical applications of respect for autonomy that emphasise competence while neglecting other important dimensions (...)
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  197. David Wendler & Franklin Miller (forthcoming). The Ethics of Peer Review in Bioethics. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101364.
    A good deal has been written on the ethics of peer review, especially in the scientific and medical literatures. In contrast, we are unaware of any articles on the ethics of peer review in bioethics. Recognising this gap, we evaluate the extant proposals regarding ethical standards for peer review in general and consider how they apply to bioethics. We argue that scholars have an obligation to perform peer review based on the extent to which they personally benefit from the peer (...)
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  198. A. Wertheimer & F. G. Miller (forthcoming). There Are (STILL) No Coercive Offers. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101510.
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  199. Anna Eva Westra & Inez de Beaufort (forthcoming). Improving the Helsinki Declaration's Guidance on Research in Incompetent Subjects. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101496.
    Research involving children or other incompetent subjects who are deemed unable to provide informed consent is complex, particularly in the case of research that does not directly benefit the research subjects themselves. The Helsinki Declaration, the World Medical Association's landmark document for research ethics, therefore states that incompetent research subjects must not be included in such research unless it entails only minimal risk and minimal burden. In this paper, we argue that now that research in these groups is expected to (...)
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  200. D. J. C. Wilkinson (forthcoming). Shades of Grey. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101726.
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  201. John R. Williams, Dominique Sprumont, Marie Hirtle, Clement Adebamowo, Paul Braunschweiger, Susan Bull, Christian Burri, Marek Czarkowski, Chien Te Fan & Caroline Franck (forthcoming). Consensus Standards for Introductory E-Learning Courses in Human Participants Research Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  202. Ambroise Wonkam, Jantina de Vries, Charmaine D. Royal, Raj Ramesar & Fru F. Angwafo (forthcoming). Would You Terminate a Pregnancy Affected by Sickle Cell Disease? Analysis of Views of Patients in Cameroon. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101392.
    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a debilitating illness that affects quality of life and life expectancy for patients. In Cameroon, it is now possible to opt for termination of an affected pregnancy (TAP) where the fetus is found to be affected by SCD. Our earlier studies found that, contrary to the views of Cameroonian physicians, a majority of parents with their children suffering from SCD would choose to abort if the fetuses were found to be affected. What have not yet (...)
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