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Forthcoming articles
  1. Luara Ferracioli & Pablo de Lora (forthcoming). Primum Nocere: Medical Brain Drain and the Duty to Stay. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhv022.
    In this essay, we focus on the moral justification and enforcement strategy of a highly controversial measure to redress medical brain drain: the duty to stay. We argue that the moral justification for this duty lies primarily in the fact that medical students impose high risks on their fellow citizens while receiving their medical training, which in turn, gives them a reciprocity-based reason to temporarily prioritize the medical needs of their fellow citizens. We also claim that responsibility for the enforcement (...)
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  2. Eric Vogelstein (forthcoming). Autonomy and the Moral Authority of Advance Directives. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    Although advance directives are widely believed to be a key way to safeguard the autonomy of incompetent medical patients, significant questions exist about their moral authority. The main philosophical concern involves cases in which an incompetent patient no longer possesses the desires on which her advance directive was based (for example, in cases of severe dementia). The question is, does that entail that prior expressions of medical choices are no longer morally binding? I believe that the answer is ‘yes.’ I (...)
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  3. Andreas Albertsen (forthcoming). Tough Luck and Tough Choices: A Luck Egalitarian Theory of Oral Healh. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
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  4. Michael Nair-Collins (forthcoming). Laying Futility to Rest. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhv019.
    In this essay I examine the formal structure of the concept of futility, enabling identification of the appropriate roles played by patient, professional, and society. I argue that the concept of futility does not justify unilateral decisions to forego life-sustaining medical treatment over patient or legitimate surrogate objection, even when futility is determined by a process or subject to ethics committee review. Furthermore, I argue for a limited positive ethical obligation on the part of health care professionals to assist patients (...)
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  5. Lasse Nielsen (forthcoming). Qualifying'the Normal Functioning View': Towards a Consensus on a Functioning-Based Framework of Health Justice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
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  6. David Wendler & Seema Shah (forthcoming). Involving Communities in Deciding What Benefits They Receive in Multinational Research. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhv017.
    There is wide agreement that communities in lower-income countries should benefit when they participate in multinational research. Debate now focuses on how and to what extent these communities should benefit. This debate has identified compelling reasons to reject the claim that whatever benefits a community agrees to accept are necessarily fair. Yet, those who conduct clinical research may conclude from this rejection that there is no reason to involve communities in the process of deciding how they benefit. Against this possibility, (...)
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