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Forthcoming articles
  1. Luara Ferracioli & Pablo de Lora (forthcoming). Primum Nocere: Medical Brain Drain and the Duty to Stay. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    In this essay, we focus on the moral justification and enforcement strategy of a highly controversial measure to redress medical brain drain: the duty to stay. We argue that the moral justification for this duty lies primarily in the fact that medical students impose high risks on their fellow citizens while receiving their medical training, which in turn, gives them a reciprocity-based reason to temporarily prioritize the medical needs of their fellow citizens. We also claim that responsibility for the enforcement (...)
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  2. A. Barnhill & F. G. Miller (forthcoming). Placebo and Deception: A Commentary. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhu043.
    In a recent article in this Journal, Shlomo Cohen and Haim Shapiro introduce the concept of “comparable placebo treatments” —placebo treatments with biological effects similar to the drugs they replace—and argue that doctors are not being deceptive when they prescribe or administer CPTs without revealing that they are placebos. We critique two of Cohen and Shapiro’s primary arguments. First, Cohen and Shapiro argue that offering undisclosed placebos is not lying to the patient, but rather is making a self-fulfilling prophecy—telling a (...)
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  3. T. Manea (forthcoming). Medical Bribery and the Ethics of Trust: The Romanian Case. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhu049.
    Medical bribery seems to be a global problem from Eastern Europe and the Balkans to China, a diffuse phenomenon, starting with morally acceptable gratitude and ending with institutional bribery. I focus my attention on Romania and analyze similar cases in Eastern European and postcommunist countries. Medical bribery can be regarded as a particular form of human transaction, a kind of primitive contract that occurs when people do not trust institutions or other forms of social contract that are meant to guarantee (...)
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  4. J. Pugh (forthcoming). Ravines and Sugar Pills: Defending Deceptive Placebo Use. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhu045.
    In this paper, I argue that deceptive placebo use can be morally permissible, on the grounds that the deception involved in the prescription of deceptive placebos can differ in kind to the sorts of deception that undermine personal autonomy. In order to argue this, I shall first delineate two accounts of why deception is inimical to autonomy. On these accounts, deception is understood to be inimical to the deceived agent’s autonomy because it either involves subjugating the deceived agent’s will to (...)
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  5. G. M. Ssebunnya (forthcoming). A Trifocal Perspective on Medicine as a Moral Enterprise: Towards an Authentic Philosophy of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhu044.
    The fundamental claim that the practice of medicine is essentially a moral enterprise remains highly contentious, not least among the dominant traditional moral theories. The medical profession itself is today characterized by multicultural pluralism and moral relativism that have left the Hippocratic moral tradition largely in disarray. In this paper, I attempt to clarify the ambiguity about practicing medicine as a moral enterprise and echo Pellegrino’s call for a phenomenologically and teleologically derived philosophy of medicine. I proffer a realistic trifocal (...)
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  6. T. A. Thomas & L. B. McCullough (forthcoming). A Philosophical Taxonomy of Ethically Significant Moral Distress. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhu048.
    Moral distress is one of the core topics of clinical ethics. Although there is a large and growing empirical literature on the psychological aspects of moral distress, scholars, and empirical investigators of moral distress have recently called for greater conceptual clarity. To meet this recognized need, we provide a philosophical taxonomy of the categories of what we call ethically significant moral distress: the judgment that one is not able, to differing degrees, to act on one’s moral knowledge about what one (...)
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  7. Andreas Albertsen (forthcoming). Tough Luck and Tough Choices: A Luck Egalitarian Theory of Oral Healh. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
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  8. Lauren Freeman (forthcoming). Confronting Diminished Epistemic Privilege and Epistemic Injustice in Pregnancy by Challenging a “Panoptics of the Womb”. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhu046.
    This paper demonstrates how the problematic kinds of epistemic power that physicians have can diminish the epistemic privilege that pregnant women have over their bodies and can put them in a state of epistemic powerlessness. This result, I argue, constitutes an epistemic injustice for many pregnant women. A reconsideration of how we understand and care for pregnant women and of the physician–patient relationship can provide us with a valuable context and starting point for helping to alleviate the knowledge/power problems that (...)
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  9. Lasse Nielsen (forthcoming). Qualifying'the Normal Functioning View': Towards a Consensus on a Functioning-Based Framework of Health Justice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
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