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Forthcoming articles
  1.  11
    H. T. Engelhardt (forthcoming). Courage: Facing and Living with Moral Diversity. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (3):278-280.
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  2. J. Adam Carter & Duncan Pritchard (forthcoming). The Epistemology of Cognitive Enhancement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    A common epistemological assumption in contemporary bioethics held b y both proponents and critics of non-traditional forms of cognitive enhancement is that cognitive enhancement aims at the facilitation of the accumulation of human knowledge. This paper does three central things. First, drawing from recent work in epistemology, a rival account of cognitive enhancement, framed in terms of the notion of cognitive achievement rather than knowledge, is proposed. Second, we outline and respond to an axiological objection to our proposal that draws (...)
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  3.  5
    Jessica Du Toit & Joseph Millum (forthcoming). Are Indirect Benefits Relevant to Health Care Allocation Decisions? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw018.
    When allocating scarce healthcare resources, the expected benefits of alternative allocations matter. But, there are different kinds of benefits. Some are direct benefits to the recipient of the resource such as the health improvements of receiving treatment. Others are indirect benefits to third parties such as the economic gains from having a healthier workforce. This article considers whether only the direct benefits of alternative healthcare resource allocations are relevant to allocation decisions, or whether indirect benefits are relevant too. First, we (...)
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  4.  24
    Eric Vogelstein (forthcoming). Autonomy and the Moral Authority of Advance Directives. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw019.
    Although advance directives are widely believed to be a key way to safeguard the autonomy of incompetent medical patients, significant questions exist about their moral authority. The main philosophical concern involves cases in which an incompetent patient no longer possesses the desires on which her advance directive was based (for example, in cases of severe dementia). The question is, does that entail that prior expressions of medical choices are no longer morally binding? I believe that the answer is ‘yes.’ I (...)
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  5. Andreas Albertsen (forthcoming). Tough Luck and Tough Choices: A Luck Egalitarian Theory of Oral Healh. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
     
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  6.  5
    Martin Marchman Andersen & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen (forthcoming). Personal Responsibility and Lifestyle Diseases. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw015.
    What does it take for an individual to be personally responsible for behaviors that lead to increased risk of disease? We examine three approaches to responsibility that cover the most important aspects of the discussion of responsibility and spell out what it takes, according to each of them, to be responsible for behaviors leading to increased risk of disease. We show that only what we call the causal approach can adequately accommodate widely shared intuitions to the effect that certain causal (...)
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  7.  5
    Marco Antonio Azevedo (forthcoming). The Misfortunes of Moral Enhancement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw016.
    In Unfit for the Future, Ingmar Persson and Julian Savulescu present a sophisticated argument in defense of the imperative of moral enhancement. They claim that without moral enhancement, the future of humanity is seriously compromised. The possibility of ultimate harm, caused by a dreadful terrorist attack or by a final unpreventable escalation of the present environmental crisis aggravated by the availability of cognitive enhancement, makes moral enhancement a top priority. It may be considered optimistic to think that our present moral (...)
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  8.  1
    Drew Carter, Jason Gordon & Amber M. Watt (forthcoming). Competing Principles for Allocating Health Care Resources. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw017.
    We clarify options for conceptualizing equity, or what we refer to as justice, in resource allocation. We do this by systematically differentiating, expounding, and then illustrating eight different substantive principles of justice. In doing this, we compare different meanings that can be attributed to “need” and “the capacity to benefit”. Our comparison is sharpened by two analytical tools. First, quantification helps to clarify the divergent consequences of allocations commended by competing principles. Second, a diagrammatic approach developed by economists Culyer and (...)
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  9.  1
    Drew Leder (forthcoming). The Experiential Paradoxes of Pain. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw020.
    Pain is far more than an aversive sensation. Chronic pain, in particular, involves the sufferer in a complex experience filled with ambiguity and paradox. The tensions thereby established, the unknowns, pressures, and oscillations, form a significant part of the painfulness of pain. This paper uses a phenomenological method to examine nine such paradoxes. For example, pain can be both immediate sensation and mediated by complex interpretations. It is a certainty for the experiencer, yet highly uncertain in character. It pulls one (...)
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  10. Lasse Nielsen (forthcoming). Qualifying'the Normal Functioning View': Towards a Consensus on a Functioning-Based Framework of Health Justice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
     
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  11.  1
    John Skalko & Mark J. Cherry (forthcoming). Bioethics and Moral Agency: On Autonomy and Moral Responsibility. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw022.
    Two clusters of essays in this issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy provide a critical gaze through which to explore central moral, phenomenological, ontological, and political concerns regarding human moral agency and personal responsibility. The first cluster challenges common assumptions in bioethics regarding the voluntariness of human actions. The second set turns the debate towards morally responsible choice within the requirements of distributive justice. The force of their collective analysis leaves us with a well-founded basis critically to approach (...)
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  12.  2
    Christopher S. Wareham (forthcoming). Substantial Life Extension and the Fair Distribution of Healthspans. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw021.
    One of the strongest objections to the development and use of substantially life-extending interventions is that they would exacerbate existing unjust disparities of healthy lifespans between rich and poor members of society. In both popular opinion and ethical theory, this consequence is sometimes thought to justify a ban on life-prolonging technologies. However, the practical and ethical drawbacks of banning receive little attention, and the viability of alternative policies is seldom considered. Moreover, where ethicists do propose alternatives, there is scant effort (...)
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