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Forthcoming articles
  1. Luara Ferracioli & Pablo de Lora (forthcoming). Primum Nocere: Medical Brain Drain and the Duty to Stay. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    In this essay, we focus on the moral justification and enforcement strategy of a highly controversial measure to redress medical brain drain: the duty to stay. We argue that the moral justification for this duty lies primarily in the fact that medical students impose high risks on their fellow citizens while receiving their medical training, which in turn, gives them a reciprocity-based reason to temporarily prioritize the medical needs of their fellow citizens. We also claim that responsibility for the enforcement (...)
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  2. Eric Vogelstein (forthcoming). Autonomy and the Moral Authority of Advance Directives. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    Although advance directives are widely believed to be a key way to safeguard the autonomy of incompetent medical patients, significant questions exist about their moral authority. The main philosophical concern involves cases in which an incompetent patient no longer possesses the desires on which her advance directive was based (for example, in cases of severe dementia). The question is, does that entail that prior expressions of medical choices are no longer morally binding? I believe that the answer is ‘yes.’ I (...)
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  3. Andreas Albertsen (forthcoming). Tough Luck and Tough Choices: A Luck Egalitarian Theory of Oral Healh. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
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  4. Lin Bian (forthcoming). Medical Individualism or Medical Familism? A Critical Analysis of China’s New Guidelines for Informed Consent: The Basic Norms of the Documentation of the Medical Record. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhv016.
    Modern Western medical individualism has had a significant impact on health care in China. This essay demonstrates the ways in which such Western-style individualism has been explicitly endorsed in China’s 2010 directive: The Basic Norms of the Documentation of the Medical Record. The Norms require that the patient himself, rather than a member of his family, sign each informed consent form. This change in clinical practice indicates a shift toward medical individualism in Chinese healthcare legislation. Such individualism, however, is incompatible (...)
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  5. Mark J. Cherry (forthcoming). Re-Thinking the Role of the Family in Medical Decision-Making. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhv011.
    This paper challenges the foundational claim that the human family is no more than a social construction. It advances the position that the family is a central category of experience, being, and knowledge. Throughout, the analysis argues for the centrality of the family for human flourishing and, consequently, for the importance of sustaining family-oriented practices within social policy, such as more family-oriented approaches to consent to medical treatment. Where individually oriented approaches to medical decision-making accent an ethos of isolated personal (...)
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  6. Ruiping Fan & Mingxu Wang (forthcoming). Taking the Role of the Family Seriously in Treating Chinese Psychiatric Patients: A Confucian Familist Review of China’s First Mental Health Act. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhv014.
    This essay argues that the Chinese Mental Health Act of 2013 is overly individualistic and fails to give proper moral weight to the role of Chinese families in directing the process of decision-making for hospitalizing and treating the mentally ill patients. We present three types of reactions within the medical community to the Act, each illustrated with a case and discussion. In the first two types of cases, we argue that these reactions are problematic either because they comply with the (...)
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  7. Ana S. Iltis (forthcoming). Risk-Taking: Individual and Family Interests. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhv010.
    Decisions regarding clinical procedures or research participation typically require the informed consent of individuals. When individuals are unable to give consent, the informed permission of a legally authorized representative or surrogate is required. Although many proposed procedures are aimed primarily at benefiting the individual, some are not. I argue that, particularly when individuals are asked to assume risks primarily or exclusively for the benefit of others, family members ought to be engaged in the informed consent process. Examples of procedures in (...)
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  8. Lasse Nielsen (forthcoming). Qualifying'the Normal Functioning View': Towards a Consensus on a Functioning-Based Framework of Health Justice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
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