Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  13
    H. T. Engelhardt (forthcoming). Courage: Facing and Living with Moral Diversity. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (3):278-280.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2. J. Adam Carter & Duncan Pritchard (forthcoming). The Epistemology of Cognitive Enhancement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    A common epistemological assumption in contemporary bioethics held b y both proponents and critics of non-traditional forms of cognitive enhancement is that cognitive enhancement aims at the facilitation of the accumulation of human knowledge. This paper does three central things. First, drawing from recent work in epistemology, a rival account of cognitive enhancement, framed in terms of the notion of cognitive achievement rather than knowledge, is proposed. Second, we outline and respond to an axiological objection to our proposal that draws (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Andreas Albertsen (forthcoming). Tough Luck and Tough Choices: A Luck Egalitarian Theory of Oral Healh. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  1
    Black Hawk Hancock & Daniel R. Morrison (forthcoming). Beyond The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying: A Theoretical and Methodological Intervention Into the Sociology of Brain Implant Surgery. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw024.
    Drawing on and extending the Foucaultian philosophical framework that Jeffrey Bishop develops in his masterful book, The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying, we undertake a sociological analysis of the neurological procedure—deep brain stimulation —which implants electrodes in the brain, powered by a pacemaker-like device, for the treatment of movement disorders. Following Bishop’s work, we carry out this analysis through a two-fold strategy. First, we examine how a multidisciplinary team evaluates candidates for this implant at a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. M. Therese Lysaught (forthcoming). From the Anticipatory Corpse to the Participatory Body. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw025.
    Jeffrey Bishop’s The Anticipatory Corpse demonstrates how death is present in and cloaked by contemporary practices of end-of-life care. A key to Bishop’s argument is that for modern medicine the cadaver has become epistemologically normative and that a metaphysics shorn of formal and final causes now shapes contemporary healthcare practices. The essays of this symposium laud and interrogate Bishop’s argument in three ways. First, they raise critical methodological challenges from the perspectives of human rights, Charles Taylor’s concept of social imaginaries, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Lasse Nielsen (forthcoming). Qualifying'the Normal Functioning View': Towards a Consensus on a Functioning-Based Framework of Health Justice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Maura A. Ryan (forthcoming). Good Deaths, “Stupid Deaths”: Humane Medicine and the Call of Invisible Bodies. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw027.
    Jeffrey Bishop’s The Anticipatory Corpse exposes a functional metaphysics at the root of contemporary medical practice that gives rise to inhumane medicine, especially at the end of life. His critique of medicine argues for alternative spaces and practices in which the communal significance of the body, its telos, can be restored and the meaning of a “good death” enriched. This essay develops an alternative epistemology of the body, drawing from Christian theological accounts of the communal or Eucharistic body and linking (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues