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Forthcoming articles
  1.  6
    H. T. Engelhardt (forthcoming). Courage: Facing and Living with Moral Diversity. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (3):278-280.
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  2.  21
    Eric Vogelstein (forthcoming). Autonomy and the Moral Authority of Advance Directives. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    Although advance directives are widely believed to be a key way to safeguard the autonomy of incompetent medical patients, significant questions exist about their moral authority. The main philosophical concern involves cases in which an incompetent patient no longer possesses the desires on which her advance directive was based (for example, in cases of severe dementia). The question is, does that entail that prior expressions of medical choices are no longer morally binding? I believe that the answer is ‘yes.’ I (...)
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  3. Andreas Albertsen (forthcoming). Tough Luck and Tough Choices: A Luck Egalitarian Theory of Oral Healh. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
     
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  4.  5
    Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco (forthcoming). The Brain Dead Patient Is Still Sentient: A Further Reply to Patrick Lee and Germain Grisez. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw008.
    Patrick Lee and Germain Grisez have argued that the total brain dead patient is still dead because the integrated entity that remains is not even an animal, not only because he is not sentient but also, and more importantly, because he has lost the radical capacity for sentience. In this essay, written from within and as a contribution to the Catholic philosophical tradition, I respond to Lee and Grisez’s argument by proposing that the brain dead patient is still sentient because (...)
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  5.  7
    E. Christian Brugger (forthcoming). Are Brain Dead Individuals Dead? Grounds for Reasonable Doubt. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw003.
    According to the biological definition of death, a human body that has not lost the capacity to holistically organize itself is the body of a living human individual. Reasonable doubt against the conclusion that it has lost the capacity exists when the body appears to express it and no evidence to the contrary is sufficient to rule out reasonable doubt against the conclusion that the apparent expression is a true expression. This essay argues that the evidence and arguments against the (...)
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  6.  5
    Maureen L. Condic (forthcoming). Determination of Death: A Scientific Perspective on Biological Integration. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw004.
    Human life is operationally defined by the onset and cessation of organismal function. At postnatal stages of life, organismal integration critically and uniquely requires a functioning brain. In this article, a distinction is drawn between integrated and coordinated biologic activities. While communication between cells can provide a coordinated biologic response to specific signals, it does not support the integrated function that is characteristic of a living human being. Determining the loss of integrated function can be complicated by medical interventions that (...)
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  7.  4
    Patrick Lee (forthcoming). Total Brain Death and the Integration of the Body Required of a Human Being. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw005.
    I develop and refine an argument for the total brain death criterion of death previously advanced by Germain Grisez and me: A human being is essentially a rational animal, and so must have a radical capacity for rational operations. For rational animals, conscious sensation is a pre-requisite for rational operation. But total brain death results in the loss of the radical capacity for conscious sensation, and so also for rational operations. Hence, total brain death constitutes a substantial change—the ceasing to (...)
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  8.  3
    Melissa Moschella (forthcoming). Deconstructing the Brain Disconnection–Brain Death Analogy and Clarifying the Rationale for the Neurological Criterion of Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw006.
    This article explains the problems with Alan Shewmon’s critique of brain death as a valid sign of human death, beginning with a critical examination of his analogy between brain death and severe spinal cord injury. The article then goes on to assess his broader argument against the necessity of the brain for adult human organismal integration, arguing that he fails to translate correctly from biological to metaphysical claims. Finally, on the basis of a deeper metaphysical analysis, I offer a revised (...)
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  9.  1
    Melissa Moschella (forthcoming). Brain Death and Human Organismal Integration: A Symposium on the Definition of Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw007.
    Does the ability of some brain dead bodies to maintain homeostasis with the help of artificial life support actually imply that those bodies are living human organisms? Or might it be possible that a brain dead body on life support is a mere collection of still-living cells, organs and tissues which can coordinate with one another, but which lack the genuine integration that is the hallmark of a unified human organism as a whole? To foster further study of these difficult (...)
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  10.  2
    Melissa Moschella & Maureen L. Condic (forthcoming). Symposium on the Definition of Death: Summary Statement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw009.
    This statement summarizes the conclusions of the Symposium on the Definition of Death, held at The Catholic University of America in June 2014. After providing the background and context for contemporary debates about brain death and describing the aims of the symposium, the statement notes points of unanimous and broad agreement among the participants, and highlights areas for further study.
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  11. Lasse Nielsen (forthcoming). Qualifying'the Normal Functioning View': Towards a Consensus on a Functioning-Based Framework of Health Justice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
     
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  12.  1
    Nikolas T. Nikas, Dorinda C. Bordlee & Madeline Moreira (forthcoming). Determination of Death and the Dead Donor Rule: A Survey of the Current Law on Brain Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhw002.
    Despite seeming uniformity in the law, end-of-life controversies have highlighted variations among state brain death laws and their interpretation by courts. This article provides a survey of the current legal landscape regarding brain death in the United States, for the purpose of assisting professionals who seek to formulate or assess proposals for changes in current law and hospital policy. As we note, the public is increasingly wary of the role of organ transplantation in determinations of death, and of the variability (...)
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