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Forthcoming articles
  1. Ruth Boeker (forthcoming). Locke on Personal Identity: A Response to the Problems of His Predecessors. Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    In this paper I argue that understanding Locke’s account of personal identity in the context of the metaphysical and religious debates of his day, especially the debates concerning the possibility of the afterlife and the resurrection, reveals the strengths of his theory. I follow Locke in classifying the views of his predecessors into material, Cartesian and non-Cartesian immaterial views of the soul, and views, according to which human beings are mind-body unions. I identify metaphysical problems for each view respectively and (...)
     
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  2. S. Seth Bordner (forthcoming). If We Stop Thinking About Berkeley's Problem of Continuity, Will It Still Exist? Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    Berkeley holds that the esse of sensible objects is percipi. So, sensible objects cannot exist unperceived. Naturally, this has invited questions about the existence of sensible objects when unperceived by finite minds. This is sometimes called the Problem of Continuity. It is frequently said that Berkeley solves the problem by invoking God’s ever-present perception to ensure that sensible objects maintain a continuous existence. Problems with this line of response have led some to a phenomenalist interpretation. This paper argues that neither (...)
     
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  3. Corey W. Dyck (forthcoming). Spontaneity Before the Critical Turn: Crusius, Tetens, and the Pre-Critical Kant on the Spontaneity of the Mind. Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    Kant’s introduction in the Kritik der reinen Vernunft (KrV) of a spontaneity proper to the understanding is often thought to be one of the central innovations of his Critical philosophy. As I show in this paper, however, a number of thinkers within the 18th century German tradition in the time before the KrV (including the pre-Critical Kant himself) had already developed a robust conception of the spontaneity of the mind, a conception which, in many respects lays the groundwork for Kant’s (...)
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  4. Jason R. Fisette (forthcoming). Hume on the Stoic Rational Passions and "Original Existences.". Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    I argue that Hume’s characterization of the passions as “original existences” is shaped by his preoccupation with Stoicism, and is not (as most commentators suppose) a ridiculous or trifling remark. My argument has three parts. First, I show that Hume’s description of the passions as “original existences” is properly understood as part of his argument against the possibility of passions caused by reason alone (rational passions). Second, I establish that Hume was responding to the Stoics, who claimed that a rational (...)
     
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  5.  78
    Karolina Hübner (forthcoming). Essence as Power, or Spinoza on Heartbreak. Journal of the History of Philosophy.
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  6. Markus Kohl (forthcoming). Radical Evil as Regulative Idea. Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    Kant's doctrine of the radical evil in human nature invites at least two serious worries: first, it is unclear how Kant could establish the claim that all human beings adopt an evil maxim; second, this claim seems to conflict with central features of Kant's doctrine of freedom. I argue, via criticisms of various charitable interpretations, that these problems are indeed insuperable if we read Kant as trying to establish that all human beings are evil as a matter of fact. I (...)
     
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  7.  81
    Colin Marshall (forthcoming). Schopenhauer and Non-Cognitivist Moral Realism. Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    Schopenhauer has been consistently ignored by contemporary metaethics, and almost no commentators on his work address the question of whether his metaethics is realist or anti-realist. I argue, however, that Schopenhauer’s views provide a powerful and novel challenge to the widely-held metaethical view that cognitivism about moral judgments is a necessary condition for moral realism. I begin by discussing how the phrase “moral realism” has been intended to characterize the family of anti-skeptical views that goes back at least to Plato. (...)
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  8.  48
    Kenneth L. Pearce (forthcoming). The Everlasting Check: Hume on Miracles. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy.
  9. J. H. Weed (forthcoming). Aquinas on Friendship. Oxford-New York: Oxford University Press. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy.
     
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  10.  10
    Jenny Pelletier (forthcoming). Review of Categories, and What is Beyond (Forthcoming). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy.
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