Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. William T. Braithwaite (forthcoming). The Common Law and the Judicial Power: An Introduction to Swift-Erie and the Problem of Transcendental Versus Positive Law. Law and Philosophy.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Adam Hosein (forthcoming). Freedom, Sex Roles, and Anti-Discrimination Law. Law and Philosophy:1-33.
    In this paper I consider the role of freedom in the justification of prohibitions on discrimination. As a case study, I focus mainly on U.S. constitutional and employment law and, in particular, restrictions on sex-stereotyping. I present a new argument that freedom can play at least some important role in justifying these restrictions. Not just any freedom, I claim: the Millian freedom to challenge existing stereotypes and contribute to social change. This ‘social change account’, I argue, can be a useful (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ryan Pevnick (forthcoming). Should Civil Liberties Have Strict Priority? Law and Philosophy:1-31.
    Many political controversies involve conflicts between civil liberties and other important social goals . The orthodox view in liberal political theory is that civil liberties must be given strict priority over competing social goals because of the importance of the interests advanced by such liberties and/or their role in upholding the status of citizens. This paper criticizes both lines of argument. Interest-based arguments fail because we are sometimes willing to sacrifice the very fundamental interests of some citizens in order to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Benjamin Rossi (forthcoming). Mental Self-Management as Attempted Negligence: Trying and Succeeding. Law and Philosophy:1-29.
    ‘Attempted negligence’ is a category of criminal offense that many jurists and philosophers have law have deemed conceptually incoherent. In his Attempts: In the Philosophy of Action and the Criminal Law, Gideon Yaffe challenges this dismissal, anchoring his argument in cases of what he calls ‘mental self-management’ in which agents plan to bring about that they perform unintentional actions at a later time. He plausibly argues that mental self-management-type attempted negligence is possible. However, his account raises the question whether such (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues