Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Simon D'Alfonso (forthcoming). The Logic of Knowledge and the Flow of Information. Minds and Machines:1-19.
    In this paper I look at Fred Dretske’s account of information and knowledge as developed in Knowledge and The Flow of Information. In particular, I translate Dretske’s probabilistic definition of information to a modal logical framework and subsequently use this to explicate the conception of information and its flow which is central to his account, including the notions of channel conditions and relevant alternatives. Some key products of this task are an analysis of the issue of information closure and an (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Andreas Elpidorou (forthcoming). Review of Robert D. Rupert's Cognitive Systems and the Extended Mind. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines.
  3. Whit Schonbein (forthcoming). Varieties of Analog and Digital Representation. Minds and Machines:1-24.
    The ‘received view’ of the analog–digital distinction holds that analog representations are continuous while digital representations are discrete. In this paper I first provide support for the received view by showing how it (1) emerges from the theory of computation, and (2) explains engineering practices. Second, I critically assess several recently offered alternatives, arguing that to the degree they are justified they demonstrate not that the received view is incorrect, but rather that distinct senses of the terms have become entrenched (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Stuart Armstrong, Anders Sandberg & Nick Bostrom (forthcoming). Thinking Inside the Box: Using and Controlling an Oracle AI. Minds and Machines.
  5. Mark Jm Bishop & C. Sdrolia (forthcoming). Rethinking Construction. On Luciano Floridi's 'Against Digital Ontology. Minds and Machines.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jamie Byrom, Christine Consell, Michael Gorman, Michael Riley & Andrew Wrenn (forthcoming). Think Through History. Minds and Machines.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Carol Cleland (forthcoming). Effective Procedures and Causal Processes. Minds and Machines.
  8. Matteo Colombo (forthcoming). Pete Mandik: This is Philosophy of Mind: An Introduction. Minds and Machines:1-4.
    Pete Mandik’s This is Philosophy of Mind is the latest addition to the “introduction to the philosophy of mind textbook” literature. It is a welcome addition, as Mandik offers readers an encompassing, up-to-date and engagingly written textbook. The objective of This is Philosophy of Mind is to communicate to a wider audience the fascinating and challenging ideas discussed in contemporary philosophy of mind. It is intended as a resource useful for both students taking a course and for anybody else who (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. K. Dautenhahn (forthcoming). Socially Intelligent Agents-Towards a Science of Social Minds. Submitted To. Minds and Machines.
  10. K. Laskey (forthcoming). Quantum Physical Symbol Systems. Submitted to Special Issue Of. Minds and Machines.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Bradford McCall (forthcoming). Alvin Plantinga: Where the Conflict Really Lies: Science, Religion, and Naturalism. Minds and Machines:1-2.
    A prominent analytic philosopher, Alvin Plantinga, here writes on one of our biggest debates—the compatibility of science and religion. I will begin this review by summarizing the contents of the book. I will then comment specifically on certain entailments of the title and give some general constructive criticisms of the text. Finally, I will remark about its potential readership. Notably, this book originated as Gifford Lectures, entitled “Science and Religion: Conflict or Concord?” at the University of St. Andrews in 2005.Plantinga’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Kourken Michaelian (forthcoming). Stanley B. Klein: The Two Selves—Their Metaphysical Commitments and Functional Independence. Minds and Machines:1-4.
    The main claim of this relatively brief but unusually ambitious book is, as the title suggests, that the self is not one but two. On the one hand, there is the epistemological self, which has a definite neurocognitive basis. On the other hand, there is the ontological self, which, in Klein’s view, is a matter of first-person subjectivity and may lack a material basis, in which case it may, in contrast to the epistemological self, not be amenable to investigation by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Aran Nayebi (forthcoming). Practical Intractability: A Critique of the Hypercomputation Movement. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines:1-31.
    For over a decade, the hypercomputation movement has produced computational models that in theory solve the algorithmically unsolvable, but they are not physically realizable according to currently accepted physical theories. While opponents to the hypercomputation movement provide arguments against the physical realizability of specific models in order to demonstrate this, these arguments lack the generality to be a satisfactory justification against the construction of any information-processing machine that computes beyond the universal Turing machine. To this end, I present a more (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. M. I. T. OpenCourseWare (forthcoming). MIT OpenCourseWare. Minds and Machines.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Kenneth R. Paap & Derek Partridge (forthcoming). Recursion Isn't Necessary for Human Language Processing: NEAR (Non-Iterative Explicit Alternatives Rule) Grammars Are Superior. Minds and Machines:1-26.
    Language sciences have long maintained a close and supposedly necessary coupling between the infinite productivity of the human language faculty and recursive grammars. Because of the formal equivalence between recursion and non-recursive iteration; recursion, in the technical sense, is never a necessary component of a generative grammar. Contrary to some assertions this equivalence extends to both center-embedded relative clauses and hierarchical parse trees. Inspection of language usage suggests that recursive rule components in fact contribute very little, and likely nothing significant, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Giuseppe Primiero (forthcoming). A Taxonomy of Errors for Information Systems. Minds and Machines:1-25.
    We provide a full characterization of computational error states for information systems. The class of errors considered is general enough to include human rational processes, logical reasoning, scientific progress and data processing in some functional programming languages. The aim is to reach a full taxonomy of error states by analysing the recovery and processing of data. We conclude by presenting machine-readable checking and resolve algorithms.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. O. Shagrir & I. Pitowsky (forthcoming). The Church-Turing Thesis and Hyper-Computation. Minds and Machines.
  18. Jacopo Tagliabue (forthcoming). Anomalous Monism in a Digital Universe. Minds and Machines:1-12.
    Bermúdez (Philosophy of psychology: a contemporary introduction, Routledge, London, 2005) identifies the “Interface Problem” as the central problem in the philosophy of psychology: how commonsensical psychological explanations can be integrated with lower-level (cognitive, biological, etc.) explanations? In particular, since folk psychology is meant to provide causal explanations on a par with, say, neurobiological explanations, the question of how to understand the relation between the two layers arises naturally. Donald Davidson claimed that the interface problem is actually ill-posed and put forward (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues