8 found

Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Michael G. Sherbert (forthcoming). Perfecting Human Futures: Transhuman Visions and Technological Imaginations. NanoEthics:1-5.
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  2. John Weckert, Hector Rodriguez Valdes & Sadjad Soltanzadeh (forthcoming). Erratum To: A Problem with Societal Desirability as a Component of Responsible Research and Innovation: The “If We Don’T Somebody Else Will” Argument. NanoEthics:1-1.
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  3. Mirko Ancillotti, Virgil Rerimassie, Stefanie B. Seitz & Walburg Steurer (forthcoming). An Update of Public Perceptions of Synthetic Biology: Still Undecided? NanoEthics:1-17.
    The discourse on the fundamental issues raised by synthetic biology, such as biosafety and biosecurity, intellectual property, environmental consequences and ethical and societal implications, is still open and controversial. This, coupled with the potential and risks the field holds, makes it one of the hottest topics in technology assessment today. How a new technology is perceived by the public influences the manner in which its products and applications will be received. Therefore, it is important to learn how people perceive synthetic (...)
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  4.  3
    Martina Baumann (forthcoming). CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing – New and Old Ethical Issues Arising From a Revolutionary Technology. NanoEthics:1-21.
    Although germline editing has been the subject of debate ever since the 1980s, it tended to be based rather on speculative assumptions until April 2015, when CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to modify human embryos for the first time. This article combines knowledge about the technical and scientific state of the art, economic considerations, the legal framework and aspects of clinical reality. A scenario will be elaborated as a means of identifying key ethical implications of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in humans and (...)
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  5. Virgil Rerimassie (forthcoming). Exploring Political Views on Synthetic Biology in the Netherlands. NanoEthics:1-20.
    Synthetic biology may be an important source of progress as well as societal and political conflict. Against this backdrop, several technology assessment organizations have been seeking to contribute to timely societal and political opinion-making on synthetic biology. The Rathenau Instituut, based in the Netherlands, is one of these organizations. In 2011, the institute organized a ‘Meeting of Young Minds’: a young people’s debate between ‘future synthetic biologists’ and ‘future politicians’. The former were represented by participants in the international Genetically Engineered (...)
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  6. Shannon Lydia Spruit, Ibo Poel & Neelke Doorn (forthcoming). Informed Consent in Asymmetrical Relationships: An Investigation Into Relational Factors That Influence Room for Reflection. NanoEthics:1-16.
    In recent years, informed consent has been suggested as a way to deal with risks posed by engineered nanomaterials. We argue that while we can learn from experiences with informed consent in treatment and research contexts, we should be aware that informed consent traditionally pertains to certain features of the relationships between doctors and patients and researchers and research participants, rather than those between producers and consumers and employers and employees, which are more prominent in the case of engineered nanomaterials. (...)
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  7.  5
    Haico te Kulve, Kornelia Konrad, Carla Alvial Palavicino & Bart Walhout (forthcoming). Context Matters: Promises and Concerns Regarding Nanotechnologies for Water and Food Applications. NanoEthics.
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  8.  2
    John Weckert, Hector Rodriguez Valdes & Sadjad Soltanzadeh (forthcoming). A Problem with Societal Desirability as a Component of Responsible Research and Innovation: The “If We Don’T Somebody Else Will” Argument. NanoEthics:1-11.
    The implementation of Responsible Research and Innovation is not without its challenges, and one of these is raised when societal desirability is included amongst the RRI principles. We will argue that societal desirability is problematic even though it appears to fit well with the overall ideal. This discord occurs partly because the idea of societal desirability is inherently ambiguous, but more importantly because its scope is unclear. This paper asks: is societal desirability in the spirit of RRI? On von Schomberg’s (...)
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