7 found

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Forthcoming articles
  1. Bárbara Nascimento Duarte (forthcoming). Entangled Agencies: New Individual Practices of Human-Technology Hybridism Through Body Hacking. NanoEthics:1-11.
    This essay develops its idiosyncrasy by concentrating primarily on the trend of body hacking. The practitioners, self-defined as body hackers, self-made cyborgs or grinders, work in different ways to develop functional and physiological modifications through the contributions of technology. Their goal is to develop by themselves an empirically man-technique fusion. These dynamic “scientific” subcultures are producing astonishing innovations. From pocket-sized kits that sample human DNA, microchip implants that keep tabs on our internal organs, blood sugar levels or moods, and even (...)
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  2. Stefan Greiner (forthcoming). Cyborg Bodies—Self-Reflections on Sensory Augmentations. NanoEthics:1-4.
    Sensory augmentation challenges current societal norms and views of what is conceived as a “normal” human being. Beginning with self reflections of a bodyhacker, the author proposes an extended view onto the human or respectively cyborg body. Based on cognitive theories, it is argumented that we are already mental cyborgs. Our brains plastically restructure themselves in order to meet new requirements of the technological extended human.
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  3. Lissette Olivares (forthcoming). Hacking the Body and Posthumanist Transbecoming: 10,000 Generations Later as the Mestizaje of Speculative Cyborg Feminism and Significant Otherness. [REVIEW] NanoEthics:1-11.
    This essay gives a situated introduction to body hacking, an underground surgical process that seeks to transform the body’s architecture, offering an ethnographic account of the affects that drive this corporeal intervention for performance artist Cheto Castellano, and later, for the author. A brief history of recent body modification movements is offered. Through these situated stories of corporeal transformation there is an exploration of Eva Hayward’s concept of transbecoming, exploring the perpetual change of the body in transition, particularly in relation (...)
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  4. Enno Park (forthcoming). Ethical Issues in Cyborg Technology: Diversity and Inclusion. NanoEthics:1-4.
    Progress has reached the point where cyborg technology is leaving the sphere of mere science fiction. Whereas society as a whole formed a symbiosis with technology long ago, individuals are now starting to merge with technology as well. The effects can already be studied by looking at the examples of smartphones, computers and the Internet. The idea of ‘repairing’ humans, medical implants more sensitive than our natural, human faculties and even non-medical implants raise a lot of ethical questions, and require (...)
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  5. Stefanie Rembold (forthcoming). Human Enhancement'? It's All About 'Body Modification'! Why We Should Replace the Term 'Human Enhancement' with 'Body Modification. NanoEthics:1-9.
    The current use of the term ‘Human Enhancement’ (‘HE’) implies that it is a modern, new phenomenon in which, for the first time in history, humans are able to break through their god or nature-given bodily limits thanks to the application of new technologies. The debate about the legitimation of ‘HE’, the selection of methods permitted, and the scope and purpose of these modern enhancement technologies has been dominated by ethical considerations, and has highlighted problems with the definition of the (...)
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  6. Haico te Kulve, Kornelia Konrad, Carla Alvial Palavicino & Bart Walhout (forthcoming). Context Matters: Promises and Concerns Regarding Nanotechnologies for Water and Food Applications. NanoEthics.
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  7. Erik Thorstensen (forthcoming). Public Involvement and Narrative Fallacies of Nanotechnologies. NanoEthics:1-14.
    This paper analyzes a European research project called ‘Deepening Ethical Engagement and Participation in Emerging Nanotechnologies’ with the abbreviation DEEPEN. The DEEPEN’s findings and conclusions on the narratives, public understandings and the lay ethics of nanotechnologies are examined in a critical manner. Through a criticism of the theoretical framings of what constitutes a narrative and the application of a different theoretical framing of narratives, the paper argues that the findings and conclusion of the DEEPEN should be approached with caution as (...)
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