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Forthcoming articles
  1. Luca Ferrero (forthcoming). Decisions, Diachronic Autonomy, and the Division of Deliberative Labor. Philosophers' Imprint.
    1.1 A distinctive feature of our agency is the ability to bind our future conduct by making future-directed decisions. The bond of decisions is not one of mere physical constraint. A decision is not the trigger of some mechanism that takes control of the agent at the future time f and physically forces her to φ. When the agent φ’s out of her past decision to do so, she is in rational control of her conduct at the time of action.1 (...)
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  2. Michelle Kosch (forthcoming). Practical Deliberationand the Voice of Conscience in Fichte's 1798 System of Ethics. Philosophers' Imprint.
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  3. Susanna Rinard (forthcoming). A Decision Theory for Imprecise Credences. Philosophers' Imprint.
    Those who model doxastic states with a set of probability functions, rather than a single function, face a pressing challenge: can they provide a plausible decision theory compatible with their view? Adam Elga (2010) and others claim that they cannot, and that the set of functions model should be rejected for this reason. This paper aims to answer this challenge. The key insight is that the set of functions model can be seen as an instance of the supervaluationist approach to (...)
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  4. Nicholas Stang (forthcoming). Who's Afraid of Double Affection? Philosophers' Imprint.
    There is substantial textual evidence that Kant held the doctrine of double affection: subjects are causally affected both by things in themselves and by appearances. However, Kant commentators have been loath to attribute this view to him, for the doctrine of double affection is widely thought to face insuperable problems. I begin by explaining what I take to be the most serious problem faced by the doctrine of double affection: appearances cannot cause the very experience in virtue of which they (...)
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