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Forthcoming articles
  1. Scott Stapleford (forthcoming). Completing Epistemic Oughts. Philosophical Forum.
    Our intuitions about what a person epistemically ought or ought not believe are sometimes quite clear. Keith DeRose and Richard Feldman have devised examples about which our intuitions are likely to conflict. DeRose argues that the conflict of intuitions arises from ambiguity in the epistemic ought. I argue that it results from incompleteness. The success of the argument depends on rejecting the narrow conception of evidential support according to which a person’s evidence supports some proposition P only if the person (...)
     
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  2. M. Balaguer (forthcoming). Can We Know That Platonism is True? Philosophical Forum.
    ? Mark BALAGUER Philosophical forum 34:3-43-4, 459-475, Blackwell, 2003.
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  3. Steven Best (forthcoming). Marx and the Problem of Conflicting Models of History. Philosophical Forum.
    Some critics argue that Marx has conflicting models of history: a "continuist" model that interprets history as a unified, evolutionary movement, and a "discontinuist" model that sees capitalist society as a break from all preceding social formations. I argue that Marx in fact does have multiple models of history, but that these are not incompatible or contradictory. Rather, Marx adopts a "perspectival" or "contextualist" approach that employs different models to gain different perspectives on the historical process. I provide a close (...)
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  4. John Andrew Fisher (forthcoming). The Very Idea of Perfect Realism. Philosophical Forum.
    I define "perfect realism" as a style of replicative sculpture: exact replicas of inanimate objects or humans. Differentiating perfect realism from "photo" or "super" realism, and from representation, I criticize various defenses of this type of art. I argue that to understand perfect realism we need a theory of replication, which I sketch. Part of the account involves X (a replica) causing the perceptual experience that it is a Y when it is not. Hence perfect realism turns on the generic (...)
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  5. Dick Howard (forthcoming). Goldmann, Kant, and the Antinomies of Democratic Politics. Philosophical Forum.
    Goldmann's "tragic vision" is shown to be founded on an antinomy between the demands of philosophy and those of sociology. To overcome this antinomy, he would need to formulate a 'second' antinomy, between philosophy and politics. This would permit him to think the political nature of modern democracy, rather than reduce it--like the Marxists--to the demands of a social class called the "bourgeoisie." The root of Goldmann's problem is shown to lie in his reading of Kant.
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  6. Brian J. Shaw (forthcoming). Totality, Realism, and the Type: Lukacs' Later Literary Criticism as Political Theory. Philosophical Forum.
    Lukacs's post-1930 literary criticism reveals a problematic continuity with the theory of totality articulated in History and Class Consciousness (1923). No longer the self-knowledge of a militant proletariat, totality emerges as the contemplative vision of great bourgeois novelists. Shorn of its earlier messianic overtones, the later criticism promises a more labile political theory whose possibilities have already been explored by theorists such as liberation theologians and socialist feminists. This same change, however, coupled with Lukacs's failure to confront its metatheoretical consequences, (...)
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  7. Mary Tijiattas (forthcoming). Bachelard and Scientific Realism. Philosophical Forum.
    It is argued that Bachelard's work in the philosophy of science is not concerned only with many of the questions which characterize contemporary Anglo-American debates. Through a radical reappraisal of the functions of experimentation, it also proposes a convincing way of analyzing the relations between theories and objects, explanations and events, which avoids both relativism and a return to naive correspondence theories.
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