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Forthcoming articles
  1. Robert Briscoe (forthcoming). Multisensory Processing and Perceptual Consciousness: Part II. Philosophy Compass.
    The first part of this survey article presented a cartography of some of the more extensively studied forms of multisensory processing. In this second part, I turn to examining some of the different possible ways in which the structure of conscious perceptual experience might also be characterized as multisensory. In addition, I discuss the significance of research on multisensory processing and multisensory consciousness for philosophical debates concerning the modularity of perception, cognitive penetration, and the individuation of the senses.
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  2. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). The Phenomenal Use of 'Look'. Philosophy Compass.
    The article provides the state of the art on the debate about whether the logical form of ‘look’ statements commits us to any particular theory of perceptual experience. The debate began with Frank Jackson’s (1977) argument that ‘look’ statements commit us to a sense-datum theory of perception. Thinkers from different camps have since then offered various rejoinders to Jackson’s argument. Others have provided novel arguments from considerations of the semantics of ‘look’ to particular theories of perception. The article closes with (...)
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  3.  50
    Stewart Duncan (forthcoming). Materialism and the Activity of Matter in Seventeenth-Century European Philosophy. Philosophy Compass.
    Draft for Philosophy Compass. New version of 23 May 2016. Early modern debates about the nature of matter interacted with debates about whether matter could think. In particular, some philosophers (e.g., Cudworth and Leibniz) objected to materialism about the human mind on the grounds that matter is passive, thinking things are active, and one cannot make an active thing out of passive material. This paper begins by looking at two seventeenth-century materialist views (Hobbes’s, and one suggested but not endorsed by (...)
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  4.  26
    Joel Krueger & Thomas Szanto (forthcoming). Extended Emotions. Philosophy Compass.
    Until recently, philosophers and psychologists conceived of emotions as brain- and body-bound affairs. But researchers have started to challenge this internalist and individualist orthodoxy. A rapidly growing body of work suggests that some emotions incorporate external resources and thus extend beyond the neurophysiological confines of organisms; some even argue that emotions can be socially extended and shared by multiple agents. Call this the extended emotions thesis (ExE). In this article, we consider different ways of understanding ExE in philosophy, psychology, and (...)
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  5. Erich Hatala Matthes (forthcoming). The Ethics of Historic Preservation. Philosophy Compass.
    This article draws together research from various sub-disciplines of philosophy to offer an overview of recent philosophical work on the ethics of historic preservation. I discuss how philosophers writing about art, culture, and the environment have appealed to historical significance in crafting arguments about the preservation of objects, practices, and places. By demonstrating how it relates to core themes in moral and political philosophy, I argue that historic preservation is essentially concerned with ethical issues.
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  6. Hannon Michael (forthcoming). The Importance of Knowledge Ascriptions. Philosophy Compass.
    Knowledge ascriptions of the form “S knows that p” are a central area of research in philosophy. But why do humans think and talk about knowledge? What are knowledge ascriptions for? This article surveys a variety of proposals about the role (or roles) of knowledge ascriptions and attempts to provide a unified account of these seemingly distinct views.
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  7.  64
    Andrew Moon (forthcoming). Recent Work in Reformed Epistemology. Philosophy Compass.
    Reformed epistemology, roughly, is the thesis that religious belief can be rational without argument. After providing some background, I present Plantinga’s defense of reformed epistemology and its influence on religious debunking arguments. I then discuss three objections to Plantinga’s arguments that arise from the following topics: skeptical theism, cognitive science of religion, and basicality. I then show how reformed epistemology has recently been undergirded by a number of epistemological theories, including phenomenal conservatism and virtue epistemology. I end by noting that (...)
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  8. Carlotta Pavese (forthcoming). Skill in Epistemology I: Skill and Knowledge. Philosophy Compass.
    Knowledge and skill are intimately connected. In this essay, I discuss the question of their relationship and of which (if any) is prior to which in the order of explanation. I review some of the answers that have been given thus far in the literature, with a particular focus on the many foundational issues in epistemology that intersect with the philosophy of skill.
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  9.  44
    Carlotta Pavese (forthcoming). Skill in Epistemology II: Skill and Know How. Philosophy Compass.
    The prequel to this paper has discussed the relation between knowledge and skill and introduced the topic of the relationship between skill and know how. This sequel continues the discussion. First, I survey the recent debate on intellectualism about knowing how (§1-3). Then, I tackle the question as to whether intellectualism (and anti-intellectualism) about skill and intellectualism (and anti-intellectualism) about know how fall or stand together (§4-5).
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  10.  24
    Pieter Adriaens & Andreas De Block (forthcoming). Homosexuality (Forthcoming). Philosophy Compass.
  11. David Christensen (forthcoming). The Epistemology of Controversy. Philosophy Compass.
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  12. Mathias Frisch (forthcoming). Philosophical Issues in Classical Electrodynamics. Philosophy Compass.
     
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  13. Julian Reiss (forthcoming). Causation Isn't Contrastive, It's Contextual. Philosophy Compass.
     
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