Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Spencer Phillips Hey (forthcoming). Theory Testing and Implication in Clinical Trials. Philosophy of Science 2014.
    John Worrall (2010) and Nancy Cartwright (2011) argue that randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are "testing the wrong theory." RCTs are designed to test inferences about the causal relationships in the study population, but this does not guarantee a justified inference about the causal relationships in the more diverse population in clinical practice. In this essay, I argue that the epistemology of theory testing in trials is more complicated than either Worrall's or Cartwright's accounts suggest. I illustrate this more complex theoretical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Matthew Kopec (forthcoming). Clines, Clusters, and Clades in the Race Debate. Philosophy of Science 81.
    Although there once was a general consensus among race scholars that applying race categories to humans is biologically illegitimate, this consensus has been erased over the past decade. This is largely due to advances in population genetics that allow biologists to pick out genetic population clusters that approximate some of our common sense racial categories. In this paper, I argue that this new ability really ought not undermine our confidence in the biological illegitimacy of the human races. Unfortunately, the claim (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Juha Saatsi & Mark Pexton (forthcoming). Reassessing Woodward's Account of Explanation: Regularities, Counterfactuals, and Noncausal Explanations. Philosophy of Science 80 (5):613-624.
    We reassess Woodward’s counterfactual account of explanation in relation to regularity explananda. Woodward presents an account of causal explanation. We argue, by using an explanation of Kleiber’s law to illustrate, that the account can also cover some noncausal explanations. This leads to a tension between the two key aspects of Woodward’s account: the counterfactual aspect and the causal aspect. We explore this tension and make a case for jettisoning the causal aspect as constitutive of explanatory power in connection with regularity (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. D. Tulodziecki (forthcoming). Shattering the Myth of Semmelweis. Philosophy of Science 80 (5):1065-1075.
    The case of Semmelweis has been well known since Hempel. More recently, it has been revived by Peter Lipton, Donald Gillies, Alexander Bird, Alex Broadbent, and Raphael Scholl. While these accounts differ on what exactly the case of Semmelweis shows, they all agree that Semmelweis was an excellent reasoner. This widespread agreement has also given rise to a puzzle: why Semmelweis’s views were rejected for so long. I aim to dissolve both this puzzle and the standard view of Semmelweis by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Yann Benétreau-Dupin (forthcoming). Blurring Out Cosmic Puzzles. Philosophy of Science.
    The Doomsday argument and anthropic arguments are illustrations of a paradox. In both cases, a lack of knowledge apparently yields surprising conclusions. Since they are formulated within a Bayesian framework, the paradox constitutes a challenge to Bayesianism. Several attempts, some successful, have been made to avoid these conclusions, but some versions of the paradox cannot be dissolved within the framework of orthodox Bayesianism. I show that adopting an imprecise framework of probabilistic reasoning allows for a more adequate representation of ignorance (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Michael E. Cuffaro (forthcoming). How-Possibly Explanations in Quantum Computer Science. Philosophy of Science.
    A primary goal of quantum computer science is to find an explanation for the fact that quantum computers are more powerful than classical computers. In this paper I argue that to answer this question is to compare algorithmic processes of various kinds, and in so doing to describe the possibility spaces associated with these processes. By doing this we explain how it is possible for one process to outperform its rival. Further, in this and similar examples little is gained in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Uljana Feest (forthcoming). Phenomenal Experiences, First-Person Methods, and the Artificiality of Experimental Data. Philosophy of Science.
    This paper argues that whereas philosophical discussions of first-person methods often turn on the veridicality of first-person reports, more attention should be paid to the experimental circumstances under which the reports are generated, and to the purposes of designing such experiments. After pointing to the ‘constructedness’ of first-person reports in the science of perception, I raise questions about the criteria by which to judge whether the reports illuminate something about the nature of perception. I illustrate this point with a historical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ehud Lamm & Ohad Kammar (forthcoming). Inferring Co-Evolution. Philosophy of Science.
    We discuss two inference patterns for inferring the coevolution of two characters based on their properties at a single point in time and determine when developmental interactions can be used to deduce evolutionary order. We discuss the use of the inference patterns we present in the biological literature and assess the arguments’ validity, the degree of support they give to the evolutionary conclusion, how they can be corroborated with empirical evidence, and to what extent they suggest new empirically addressable questions. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. David Ludwig (forthcoming). Against the New Metaphysics of Race. Philosophy of Science.
    The aim of this article is to develop an argument against metaphysical debates about the existence of human races. I argue that the ontology of race is underdetermined by both empirical and non-empirical evidence due to a plurality of equally permissible candidate meanings of "race." Furthermore, I argue that this underdetermination leads to a deflationist diagnosis according to #hich disputes about the existence of human races are non-substantive verbal disputes. $hile this diagnosis resembles general deflationist strategies in contemporary metaphysics" I (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Bence Nanay (forthcoming). Teleosemantics Without Etiology. Philosophy of Science.
    The aim of teleosemantics is to give a scientifically respectable, or ‘naturalistic’ theory of mental content. In the debates surrounding the scope and merits of teleosemantics a lot has been said about the concept of indication (or carrying information). The aim of this paper is to focus on the other key concept of teleosemantics: biological function. It has been universally accepted in the teleosemantics literature that the account of biological function one should use to flesh out teleosemantics is that of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Cailin O'Connor (forthcoming). Evolving Perceptual Categories. Philosophy of Science.
    This article uses sim-max games to model perceptual categorization with the goal of answering the following question: To what degree should we expect the perceptual categories of biological actors to track properties of the world around them? I argue that an analysis of these games suggests that the relationship between real-world structure and evolved perceptual categories is mediated by successful action in the sense that organisms evolve to categorize together states of nature for which similar actions lead to similar results. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Alexander Reutlinger (forthcoming). Why Is There Universal Macro-Behavior? Renormalization Group Explanation As Non-Causal Explanation. Philosophy of Science.
    Renormalization group (RG) methods are an established strategy to explain how it is possible that microscopically different systems exhibit virtually the same macro behavior when undergoing phase-transitions. I argue – in agreement with Robert Batterman – that RG explanations are non-causal explanations. However, Batterman misidentifies the reason why RG explanations are non-causal: it is not the case that an explanation is non- causal if it ignores causal details. I propose an alternative argument, according to which RG explanations are non-causal explanations (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Nicholas Shea (forthcoming). Neural Signalling of Probabilistic Vectors. Philosophy of Science.
    Recent work combining cognitive neuroscience with computational modelling suggests that distributed patterns of neural firing may represent probability distributions. This paper asks: what makes it the case that distributed patterns of firing, as well as carrying information about (correlating with) probability distributions over worldly parameters, represent such distributions? In examples of probabilistic population coding, it is the way information is used in downstream processing so as to lead to successful behaviour. In these cases content depends on factors beyond bare information, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Thomas Anthony Ambriz (forthcoming). Okruhlik and Scientific Rationality. Philosophy of Science.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. M. Curd & J. A. Cover (forthcoming). Rationality, Objectivity, and Values in Science. Philosophy of Science.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. G. Darvas (forthcoming). Ontological Levels and Symmetry Breaking, Paideia. Philosophy of Science.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Machery Edouard (forthcoming). Concepts Are Not a Natural Kind. Philosophy of Science.
    In cognitive psychology, concepts are those data structures that are stored in long-term memory and are used by default in human beings' higher cognitive processes (categorization, inductive and deductive reasoning...). Most psychologists of concepts assume that these mental representations share many scientifically important properties, and the psychology of concepts is expected to describe those properties. Psychologists assume thereby that concepts constitute a natural kind. I call this assumption the Natural Kind Assumption. This article challenges the Natural Kind Assumption. It is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Alexandre Fonseca (forthcoming). A Game of Science. Philosophy of Science.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Malcolm R. Forster, I. A. Kieseppä, Dan Hausman, Alexei Krioukov, Stephen Leeds, Alan Macdonald & Larry Shapiro (forthcoming). The Conceptual Role of 'Temperature'in Statistical Mechanics: Or How Probabilistic Averages Maximize Predictive Accuracy. Philosophy of Science.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Roman Frigg & Charlotte Werndl (forthcoming). Explaining the Approach to Equilibrium in Terms of Epsilon-Ergodicity. Philosophy of Science.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. K. Kelly & G. Glymour (forthcoming). On Converging to the Truth and Nothing but the Truth. Philosophy of Science.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. V. S. Kharchenko, O. M. Tarasyuk & V. V. Sklyar (forthcoming). The Matrix-Graph Method Of Choice And Verification Of Software Reliability Models. Philosophy of Science.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Tonći Kokić (forthcoming). Non-Random Nature of Genetic Mutation. Philosophy of Science.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. E. Machery (forthcoming). Forthcoming. Massive Modularity and Brain Evolution. Philosophy of Science.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. John Andrew Michael & Francesca Fardo (forthcoming). What (If Anything) is Shared in Pain Empathy? Philosophy of Science.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. H. P. Noyes, Mcgoveran Do & Observable Gravitational (forthcoming). BN8 5DH, UK.\ Bibitem {38} CW Kilmister,{\ It Eddington's Search for a Fundamental Theory: A Key to the Universe}, Cambridge, 1994.\ Bibitem {39}. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Fabrice Pataut (forthcoming). Empiricism, Rational Belief and Objectivity. Philosophy of Science.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Bret Spears (forthcoming). December 8, 2004 Philosophy of Science Dr. Shanahan “Phil-Sci Suicide: The Deflation of a Debate and Silence For the Rest of It”. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ulrich E. Stegmann & Recensione di Daniele Romano (forthcoming). Il'PENSARIO'della Biblioteca filosofica. Philosophy of Science.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues