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  1. Ronald Aronson (2015). Surviving the Neoliberal Maelstrom: A Sartrean Phenomenology of Social Hope. Sartre Studies International 21 (1):21-33.
    It might seem that Sartre's thought is no longer relevant in understanding and combating the maelstrom unleashed by triumphant neoliberalism. But we can still draw inspiration from Sartre's hatred of oppression and his project to understand how his most famous theme of individual self-determination and responsibility coexists with our social belonging and determination by historical forces larger than ourselves. Most important today is Sartre's understanding in _Critique of Dialectical Reason_ of how isolated, serial individuals form into groups to resist oppression, (...)
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  2. Larry Busk (2015). The Violence of the Political and the Politics of Violence: Dirty Hands Reconsidered. Sartre Studies International 21 (1):53-74.
    This article considers Sartre's perspective on political violence with reference to his 1948 play _Dirty Hands_. Focusing on the concrete political questions that confronted Sartre in his context, it traces the development and result of conversations with Merleau-Ponty, Camus and the Marxist tradition that shaped his thinking on this subject. At the end of this dialectical process, Sartre arrived at a position that refused both bourgeois humanism, with its disavowal of political violence, and what is here termed Official Communism – (...)
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  3. Kate Kirkpatrick (2015). Sartre: An Augustinian Atheist? Sartre Studies International 21 (1):1-20.
    This article attempts to redress the neglect of Sartre's relationship to Augustine, putting forward a reading of the early Sartre as an atheist who appropriated concepts from Augustinian theology. In particular, it is argued, Sartre owes a debt to the Augustinian doctrine of original sin. Sartre's portrait of human reality in _Being and Nothingness_ is bleak: consciousness is lack; self-knowledge is impossible; and to turn to the human other is to face the imprisonment of an objectifying gaze. But this has (...)
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  4. David Lethbridge (2015). Sartre's Crabs. Sartre Studies International 21 (1):75-89.
    Sartre's phobia of crabs is traced through his experimental experience with mescaline and such literary works as _Nausea_, _The Words_ and _The Condemned of Altona_. The phobia is analysed through an examination of Sartre's biphasic childhood Oedipus complex and attendant castration anxiety relating to his mother, father and stepfather. Finally, the question is raised of what the existence of unconscious phobias might imply about the relations between existentialism and psychoanalysis.
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  5. Dane Sawyer (2015). Playing Seriously with Bad Faith: A Derridean Intersection. Sartre Studies International 21 (1):34-52.
    In this article, I reconsider the question of how best to understand Sartre's concept of bad faith by investigating it through the Derridean lens of deconstruction. I argue that Sartre's discussion of bad faith in _Being and Nothingness_ mirrors Derrida's criticisms of structuralism in 'Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences'. Examining their distinctive discussions of 'play', I claim that Derrida's unique deconstructive interpretation of this notion operates within Sartre's criticisms of the 'spirit of seriousness'. I (...)
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