The Centrality of Belief and Reflection in Knobe-Effect Cases

The Monist 95 (2):264-289 (2012)
Recent work in experimental philosophy has shown that people are more likely to attribute intentionality, knowledge, and other psychological properties to someone who causes a bad side effect than to someone who causes a good one. We argue that all of these asymmetries can be explained in terms of a single underlying asymmetry involving belief attribution because the belief that one’s action would result in a certain side effect is a necessary component of each of the psychological attitudes in question. We argue further that this belief-attribution asymmetry is rational because it mirrors a belief-formation asymmetry, and that the belief-formation asymmetry is also rational because it is more useful to form some beliefs than others.
Keywords Knobe effect  folk psychology  intentionality  heuristics  intentionality  belief
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DOI 10.5840/monist201295215
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