Hypocrisy: What Counts?

Philosophical Psychology (5):1-29 (2012)
Abstract
Hypocrisy is a multi-faceted concept that has been studied empirically by psychologists and discussed logically by philosophers. In this study, we pose various behavioral scenarios to research participants and ask them to indicate whether the actor in the scenario behaved hypocritically. We assess many of the components that have been considered to be necessary for hypocrisy (e.g., the intent to deceive, self-deception), factors that may or may not be distinguished from hypocrisy (e.g., weakness of will), and factors that may moderate hypocrisy (e.g., the degree of discrepancy between the attitude and behavior, whether the attitude is stated publicly, and the nature and severity of the behavioral consequences). Our findings indicate that lay conceptions of hypocrisy are often at odds with philosophical speculation. We argue that a complete understanding of the criteria for hypocrisy requires consideration of how ordinary people construe the concept. In contrast to some concepts (e.g., physical causation), for which lay conceptions, while interesting, are largely irrelevant, hypocrisy is an essential component of social judgment. One could argue, therefore, that folk wisdom is the ultimate arbiter of what hypocrisy entails. We note limitations of our methodology and suggest avenues for future research.
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References found in this work BETA
Roger Crisp & Christopher Cowton (1994). Hypocrisy and Moral Seriousness. American Philosophical Quarterly 31 (4):343 - 349.
Eva Feder Kittay (1982). On Hypocrisy. Metaphilosophy 13 (3-4):277-289.
Dan Turner (1990). Hypocrisy. Metaphilosophy 21 (3):262-269.

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