How to count people

Philosophical Studies 154 (2):185 - 204 (2011)
Abstract
How should we count people who have two cerebral hemispheres that cooperate to support one mental life at the level required for personhood even though each hemisphere can be disconnected from the other and support its "own" divergent mental life at that level? On the standard method of counting people, there is only one person sitting in your chair and thinking your thoughts even if you have two cerebral hemispheres of this kind. Is this method accurate? In this paper, I argue that it is not, and I advocate an alternative I call the Multiple Person View
Keywords Metaphysics  Personal identity  Cerebral hemispheres  Division  Animalism
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    References found in this work BETA
    W. R. Carter (1980). Once and Future Persons. American Philosophical Quarterly 17 (1):61 - 66.
    W. R. Carter (1999). Will I Be a Dead Person? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (1):167 - 171.

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