If the genome isn't a God-like ghost in the machine, then what is it?

Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):401-407 (2005)
Abstract
Implicit God-like and ghost-in-the-machine metaphors underlie much current thinking about genomes. Although many criticisms of such views exist, none have succeeded in substituting a different, widely accepted view. Viewing the genome with its protein packaging as a brain gets rid of Gods and ghosts while plausibly integrating machine and information-based views. While the ‘wetware’ of brains and genomes are very different, many fundamental principles of how they function are similar. Eukaryotic cells are compound entities in which case the nuclear genome might best be thought of more as a government than simply as a brain.
Keywords Cellular brain  Cellular government  Function of the genome  Gene concepts  Genetic information  Molecular machines  Origin of eukaryotic cell  Selfish gene
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