Theory and observation in science

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2009)
Scientists obtain a great deal of the evidence they use by observingnatural and experimentally generated objects and effects. Much of thestandard philosophical literature on this subject comes from20th century logical positivists and empiricists, theirfollowers, and critics who embraced their issues and accepted some oftheir assumptions even as they objected to specific views. Theirdiscussions of observational evidence tend to focus on epistemologicalquestions about its role in theory testing. This entry follows theirlead even though observational evidence also plays important andphilosophically interesting roles in other areas including scientificdiscovery and the application of scientific theories to practicalproblems
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DOI 10.1111/1467-9973.00225
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