Needs and Global Justice

Abstract
In this paper I argue that needs are tremendously salient in developing any plausible account of global justice. I begin by sketching a normative thought experiment that models ideal deliberating conditions. I argue that under such conditions we would choose principles of justice that ensure we are well positioned to be able to meet our needs. Indeed, as the experiment aims to show, any plausible account of distributive justice must make space for the special significance of our needs. I go on to offer some empirical support for this view by looking at the important work of Frohlich and Oppenheimer. I then present an account of our basic needs that can meet a number of goals: for instance, it provides a robust theoretical account of basic needs which can enjoy widespread support, and it can also provide an adequate framework for designing policy about needs, and thus help us to discharge our global obligations. I then briefly discuss the relationship between basic needs and human rights, arguing why the basic needs standard is more fundamental than—and required by—the human rights approach. Finally, I tackle a few important sets of objections to my view, especially some objections concerning distributing our responsibilities for meeting needs.
Keywords Global Justice  Needs
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history Request removal from index
 
Download options
PhilPapers Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy on self-archival     Papers currently archived: 11,365
External links
Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Similar books and articles
Laura Valentini (2011). Coercion and (Global) Justice. American Political Science Review 105 (1):205-220.
Chris Armstrong (2009). Basic Needs, Equality and Global Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (3):245 – 251.
Nigel Dower (2004). Global Economy, Justice and Sustainability. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):399 - 415.
Dale Dorsey (2005). Global Justice and the Limits of Human Rights. Philosophical Quarterly 55 (221):562–581.
Win-Chiat Lee (2012). Cosmopolitanism with Room for Nationalism. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (2):279-293.
Jennifer Prah Ruger (2012). Global Health Justice and Governance. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (12):35-54.
Analytics

Monthly downloads

Added to index

2010-09-02

Total downloads

31 ( #57,244 of 1,102,762 )

Recent downloads (6 months)

1 ( #296,987 of 1,102,762 )

How can I increase my downloads?

My notes
Sign in to use this feature


Discussion
Start a new thread
Order:
There  are no threads in this forum
Nothing in this forum yet.