The origins of the spacetime metric: Bell's lorentzian pedagogy and its significance in general relativity

In Craig Callender & Nick Huggett (eds.), Physics Meets Philosophy at the Plank Scale. Cambridge University Press 256--72 (2001)
The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the `Lorentzian Pedagogy' defended by J.S. Bell in his essay ``How to teach special relativity'', and to explore its consistency with Einstein's thinking from 1905 to 1952. Some remarks are also made in this context on Weyl's philosophy of relativity and his 1918 gauge theory. Finally, it is argued that the Lorentzian pedagogy---which stresses the important connection between kinematics and dynamics---clarifies the role of rods and clocks in general relativity.
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Michel Janssen (2008). Drawing the Line Between Kinematics and Dynamics in Special Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (1):26-52.
Katherine A. Brading (2002). Which Symmetry? Noether, Weyl, and Conservation of Electric Charge. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 33 (1):3-22.
Michael Dickson (2004). A View From Nowhere: Quantum Reference Frames and Uncertainty. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (2):195-220.
Eleanor Knox (2013). Effective Spacetime Geometry. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (3):346-356.
James Mattingly (2006). Which Gauge Matters? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 37 (2):243-262.

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